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Posts Tagged ‘pirates’

Antipiracy Service Targets eBooks on File Sharing Sites

The Curtis Agency and E-Reads will tackle eBook piracy as a team, making it easier for authors to find pirated material and send take-down letters.

They have enlisted the technological assistance of Muso TNT, a company that targets piracy for other media industry clients. Muso developed a system that targets popular file sharing sites like RapidShare and Megaupload.

Here’s more from the article: “Using the Muso technology, legitimate content providers authorize the antipiracy service to launch search engine ‘spiders’ to crawl over the Internet and detect unauthorized files. A significant feature is that the search criterion is by author, not by title. As the spiders locate pirated files, they store the results on a password-protected login page for review.”

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Survey: ‘One in Every Three People Who Download eBooks on Their Digital Readers Do So Illegally’

The High Low tackled one of the toughest questions facing publishers: “Will eBooks become the next Napster?” They quoted some surprising statistics.

Here’s more from the article: “One in every three people who download e-books on their digital readers do so illegally, according to a survey of 1,959 consumers conducted by a British law firm … Record labels notoriously lost millions thanks to Napster (which was eventually ruled illegal), and now publishers are staring down the same tunnel.”

The same survey also revealed that twenty five percent of those who admitted to illegally downloading eBooks would continue to do so in the future. Because illegally downloaded books are not physical objects, pirates tend not to classify their activities as stealing. What do you think about this dilemma?