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Posts Tagged ‘Publishers Weekly’

James Grimmelman Joins Publishers Weekly As Contributing Editor For Legal Affairs

New York Law School professor of law James Grimmelman has joined Publishers Weekly as contributing editor for legal affairs.

Grimmelman, who writes about intellectual property, online privacy and Internet law, created the site The Public Index as a place for readers to learn about the Google Books settlement.

In his role as contributor for PW, Grimmelman will contribute blog posts, occasional features and columns, as well as provide the magazine with editorial guidance on legal stories.

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Nancy Pearl Launches Library Column at Publishers Weekly

Award-winning librarian Nancy Pearl (pictured, via) has joined Publishers Weekly. Pearl’s new library-themed column, “Check It Out,” will feature her responses to questions, comments, and observations from librarians, publishers, readers, and others.

The column will run on a monthly basis in Publishers Weekly‘s print periodicals. It will be introduced in both the May 30th print issue and online.

Pearl had this statement in the release: “[I'm] looking forward to hearing from readers across the street and around the world on book- and library-related topics large and small. In my radio work and public presentations, my favorite part is always taking questions from the audience. With my ‘Check It Out’ column there are two things you can count on: I have lots of opinions, and I will always be honest in my responses.”

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PW’s Notables 2010: No Women? Few People of Color?

The industry bible, Publisher’s Weekly, released their picks of Notables of 2010 in book publishing this week. Among the names were Barnes & Noble’s Len Riggio, veteran literary agent, Andrew Wylie, Google’s Tom Turvey and others.

One quick glance at the list and readers may notice something is missing. Although certainly notable and arguably deserving of accolades, PW’s list this year negates to mention any women in book publishing and virtually no people of color.

If you could nominate anyone as a 2010 Notable Woman or a Notable Person of Color in book publishing, who would you nominate? Would it be Jane Friedman for her e-publishing venture Open Road Media, perhaps Jamie Raab for Hachette’s notable success with Grand Central, perhaps Alex Simmons for his work with Kids Comic Con, Junot Diaz for being chosen as a prestigious member of the Pulitzer Prize Board or someone else?

Comment below and tell us your thoughts.

EDITOR’S NOTE: A previous version of this post mentioned Sonny Mehta, a publisher of Indian descent. The reference was removed and the post was modified. This correction was not immediately noted in the post, as is our usual policy when facts are changed within a post.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: The headline has been corrected as well to reflect the change.

*Full Disclosure: This GalleyCat blogger is published by Grand Central.

Guggenheim Fellowship Winners Announced

gugg.jpgEleven fiction writers, nine poets, and twelve nonfiction authors all were awarded Guggenheim Fellowships yesterday.

In all, 180 scholars received the coveted fellowships this year–picked from over 3,000 applications. Awarded by John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the fellowships were established in 1925 in honor of US Senator Simon Guggenheim‘s son who died in 1922.

Publishers Weekly broke down the winners by genre: “Saskia Hamilton, Joseph Harrison, Terrance Hayes, Lyn Hejinian, Laura Kasischke, Barbara Ras, Lisa Russ Spaar, Larissa Szporluk, and Daniel Tobin. In fiction: Chris Abani, Chris Adrian, Stacey D’Erasmo, Ellen Feldman, John Haskell, Ken Kalfus, Marshall N. Klimasewiski, Richard Lange, Zachary Lazar, Fae Myenne Ng, and George Singleton.”

Reed Business Information Dumps Some Suitors, Keeps Others

reed-business-logo.gifOver the weekend, paidContent.org’s Rafat Ali reported that the second round of bidding for the assets of Reed Business Information (including Publishers Weekly) had begun—with McGraw-Hill cited as one of the leading contenders and Nielsen emerging as a less clear candidate for the role of buyer.

Now that would be a interesting turn of events, because it would place the PW, Library Journal and Kirkus brands in the same basket—and, though it’s not as immediately relevant to us in the book world, Variety and The Hollywood Reporter. That said, it should be noted that two weeks ago, former NY Times film industry correspondent Sharon Waxman blogged that she had been told Nielsen might seek to unload its own business media division, which would probably put them out of the running for buying Reed Elsevier’s. McGraw-Hill, on the other hand, would conceivably be interested in absorbing RBI’s expansive portfolio of construction industry-directed media to augment its own offerings in that field, with the brands serving the publishing industry representing new territory that—and I’m just speculating wildly here—could fit under the BusinessWeek umbrella.

Whoever acquires RBI, though, it’s highly likely that the new owners may want to strip the main brands of all the baggage they’ve accumulated over the years and rebuild—merging the legacy identities with a new sense of best practices in serving industry-specific markets.