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Posts Tagged ‘Rachel Deahl’

Publishers Weekly Releases eBook Guide to Publishing & Self-Publishing

pwlogoPublishers Weekly has published a self-published eBook guide. Publishing 101: The Publishers Weekly Introduction to Publishing and Self-Publishing is designed to help authors navigate every step of the publishing process.

Written by journalist Rachel Deahl the book takes readers through the various steps that writers should prepare for when self-publishing. The ebook includes insights on relationships with agents, editors, publicists and publishing houses. There are tips on what to look for in a contract, as well as the pros and cons of working with the various self-publishing platforms.

Earlier this week, the trade publisher revealed plans for a new self-publishing focused website. Next week, Publishers Weekly will launch BookLife, a website dedicated to self-publishing.

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New Literary Editor for The Nation

PW Daily’s Rachel Deahl reports that The Nation‘s current books editor Adam Shatz is making way for John Palatella, who arrives by way of the Columbia Journalism Review. Shatz is moving on to the London Review of Books. According to Nation editor-in-chief Katrina vanden Heuvel, Palatella will uphold the magazine’s commitment to serious book coverage. Speaking to the fact that most publications are cutting back on the pages they devote to books, vanden Heuvel said The Nation “believes in [books coverage] more than ever.” There will, however be some changes: Palatella plans look to bring more essays about literature and pop culture into the section and also beef up online coverage of books and the arts.

Holtzbrinck Gets Into Podcasting in a Big Way

PW Daily’s Rachel Deahl reports on Quick and Dirty Tips, an online network of downloadable audio snippets just launched today by Holtzbrinck. The move marks the first attempt by a publisher to establish a money making podcast business and features Grammar Girl‘s Mignon Fogarty as well as five other podcasters who, according to Holtzbrinck, have collectively been downloaded more than 10 million times. The site will generate revenue through online ads and content licensing agreements.

Publicist Claire McKinney confirmed to PW that the hosts – some of whom Holtzbrinck brought into the fold and others who were brought on by Fogarty – are established, to varying degrees, in the podcast world. The first additional podcaster, a Harvard M.B.A. named Stever Robbins, will be added to the site in September, to host a show about what the house dubbed “personal productivity” called Get It Done Guy. When asked how this business model differs from other podcasting sites, Richard Rohrer, Holt’s director of marketing (who also has the new title of executive producer for quickanddirtytips.com), said other sites are a “catch all” for audio content. Not so with Holtzbrinck’s venture. “Each podcast gives one piece of actionable advice,” he explained. “You don’t have that consistency of purpose with any other podcasting-dedicated site.”

Bantam Dell Doubles Paperback Format Fun

Upon first reading Rachel Deahl‘s story in PW Daily yesterday, I couldn’t help but wonder how feasible Bantam Dell‘s upcoming Discovery imprint – which will publish select titles in trade and mass market paperback – would be. But then, enough publishers (think McAdam/Cage or many a UK publisher) have simultaneous hardback/paperback releases that do rather well, so why not? And whether to publish a book in mass market or trade paperback is one of the toughest decisions in the editorial boardroom, according to Bantam Dell’s senior v-p and executive director of publicity, Barb Burg, so from February 2008 on they’ll roll out titles in both formats starting with Tess Stimson‘s UK bestseller THE ADULTERY CLUB.

Announcing a seven-figure marketing campaign behind the list, Deahl reports that Bantam Dell is taking a pricey gamble on whether offering readers and booksellers more choice will help them sell more books. The “dream”, Burg said, is to see some accounts take both formats and have booksellers sell the same title, in paper and trade paper, side by side. And, as Bantam Dell president Irwyn Applebaum noted, bring these authors to market with “immediacy and impact.”

When Publicity Campaigns Go Slightly Awry

Last Friday, I received a letter in the mail, addressed directly to me. I didn’t recognize the sender but figuring it was probably something publicity-related, I opened it. A florally-designed letter slipped out that addresses one Mr. Pulsifer and is signed “Sincerely, Beatrice Hutchins, Lenox, MA.” Publicity stunt, I figured after skimming the letter briefly, even though there was no mention of a novel, a publisher or an author, and forgot about it.

Turns out I was right, but when a staffer at Publishers Weekly received the letter – which contained a mention of Edith Wharton‘s house – contacted Susan Wissler, v-p of The Mount, the formal name for Wharton’s estate, she thought that the request to “burn down [Wharton's] house”, though likely a joke, contained sufficient “menace” to warrant involving the police. And so, PW Daily’s Rachel Deahl reports, Wissler contacted the Massachusetts State Police about the note, but was relieved to find out t was, in fact, a publicity campaign for Brock Clarke‘s AN ARSONIST’S GUIDE TO WRITERS HOMES IN NEW ENGLAND, which Algonquin Books is publishing this September and pushing in a big way, with a first printing of 50,000 copies and a big galley giveaway at and after BEA.

The mailing campaign, which will continue with two more letters this week – also done in character and threatening the homes of two other deceased, iconic New England writers – will culminate with a galley of the book. When asked if the house had any concerns that the letter might alarm its recipients, Algonquin publicity director Michael Taeckens and Algonquin associate publisher Ina Stern said the intention was to provoke, not scare. Wissler, though initially alarmed, is now rather amused at the whole situation, adding to PW Daily that she is now eager to find out more about the book. After talking with an Algonquin spokesperson, she even expressed interest in having Clarke stop at The Mount on his planned author tour. All’s well that ends well, in other words…

Simon & Schuster Sets up Shop in India

PW Daily’s Rachel Deahl reports that Simon & Schuster is the latest publisher to see the Indian publishing market’s potential for profit and prosperity. Following Penguin and HarperCollins‘ lead, S&S will produce and market select titles from its American and U.K. lists – the first of which will be Mira Kamdar‘s PLANET INDIA, slated for publication by Scribner next month. Cyrus Kheradi, v-p and group sales director of S&S’s international division, will oversee titles for the India program along with Indian regional sales manager Rahul Srivastava. The division will based at the New Delhi office S&S established last year.