InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Richard Pine’

Susan Orlean To Write About Infamous LAPL Fire

Author and New Yorker staff writer Susan Orlean inked a deal for The Library Book.

The book will explore the power of libraries and her “quest to solve a crime that has gone unsolved since it was carried out in 1986: who set fire to the Los Angeles Public Library, ultimately destroying 400,000 books?” If you want to read more about this sad story, the LAPL posted a complete account of the fire.

InkWell Management agent Richard Pine negotiated the deal with Jonathan Karp and Jofie Ferrari-Adler at Simon & Schuster.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Andrea Cremer Inks Erotica Book Deal

YA author Andrea Cremer has landed a book deal with Penguin Group (USA)’s Dutton imprint to write an erotica trilogy for adults. The not-yet-titled first book will be available in October 2013.

Cremer established her career as a YA author with the Nightshade trilogy, a fantasy series starring teen werewolves. The new adult books will be set in this Nightshade universe.

According to Publisher’s Weekly, Dutton publisher Brian Tart negotiated the deal with InkWell Management literary agents Richard Pine and Charlie Olsen. Associate editor Jessica Horvath will edit the books.

Read more

Self-Published Nutritionist Inks 7-Figure Book Deal

British nutritionist Venice A. Fulton has scored a 7-figure book deal with Grand Central Publishing for his diet book Six Weeks to OMG. The book first hit the scene as a self-published work.

In the book, Fulton shares his diet tricks, which he has used in his work as a celebrity trainer. His ideas are somewhat controversial. For example, he suggests skipping breakfast and not eating broccoli.

Responding to a doctor’s criticism of his approach, Venice blogged: “In simple terms, doctors are the mechanics who patch things up when they go wrong.  I’m extremely grateful for the job they do, and have fond memories of doctors visiting me as a child, and making me better again.  But in terms of preventative advice, they can’t be trusted.  In terms of cutting-edge advice, they’re even more behind the times.”

Read more

Andrea Cremer Lands Book Deal for YA Steampunk Series

Nightshade trilogy author Andrea Creamer has inked a deal with Penguin Group (USA)’s Philomel imprint for a new YA steampunk series.

The first book, titled The Inventor’s Secret, is slated for publication in fall 2013. Executive editor Jill Santopolo negotiated the deal with InkWell Management literary agents Richard Pine and Charlie Olsen.

Here’s more from the release: “The series is set in an alternate nineteenth-century North America where the Revolutionary War never took place and the British Empire has expanded into a global juggernaut propelled by marvelous and horrible machinery…As part of the deal, Philomel has also acquired a second prequel to Nightshade entitled RISE, which is scheduled for publication in summer 2013. The first prequel to Nightshade,entitled RIFT, is scheduled for publication in fall 2012.” (Photo Credit: Gina Monroe)

Read more

Sh*t My Kids Ruined Lands Book Deal

kidsruined.jpg

The Tumblr to book deal trend continues apace as Julie Haas Brophy landed a book deal with Villard for her blog, Sh*t My Kids Ruined.

Just like the Tumblr blog, the book will include snappy commentary and plenty of photos of wrecked objects, rooms, and children–like this orange and blue paint mess that created a carpet-cleaning emergency. According to Publishers Weekly, the deal was negotiated by Inkwell Management’s Richard Pine and Villard’s Marnie Cochran acquired the title.

Here’s more about the book: “[It] will feature photos and stories of children destroying everything from windows to VCRs to their parents’ physique. The book, like the blog, will aim to offer a cathartic way for parents to laugh through, and off, the frustrations of child-rearing.”

If you want to dispel some of the myths about these trends, check out this mediabistro.com article, The Truth About Blog-to-Book Deals.

Susan Boyle’s Got Literary Buzz

susan123.jpgThe grey-haired church lady turned international pop sensation, Susan Boyle, has spawned literary bids around the world.

The singer’s spot on the reality show Britain’s Got Talent generated 41 million views on YouTube, landing the singer television, tabloid, and Internet fame. In the United States, the singer’s book auction will be handled by agent Richard Pine. In England, she is represented by agent Mark Lucas.

Here’s more from Crain’s: “Some publishing executives who think there is potential in Ms. Boyle’s book are still nervous about spending the millions it might take to buy it. ‘She has a story,’ says an editor at one house considering the book. ‘But it’s a short story.’” (Photo via, link via.)

Hudson Street Press EIC Scores “America’s Best Known Doctor”

weil.jpgNewly-hired Hudson Street Press editor Caroline Sutton landed a plum first deal earlier this week, buying the next book by Andrew Weil M.D., the author of five consecutive #1 NY Times bestsellers. The NY Times once wrote that Weil “has arguably become America’s best-known doctor.”

Set for a September 2009 release, “Why Our Health Matters: A Vision of Medicine That Can Transform Our Future,” Weil worries that health care problems could unravel the economy. Richard Pine from Inkwell Literary Management sealed the deal.

Here’s more from EIC Sutton’s statement: “Health and medicine have become a major issue in our society. Dr. Weil shows us exactly how we let this crisis happen and what we can do to resolve it. He writes with such passion that he will inspire readers to act.” (Photo via DrWeil.com)

Another Day, Another Possible Fake Memoir

Just when we thought the whole “fake memoir” craze from last year had completely abated, along comes the New York Times’ Abby Ellin to upset the apple cart once more. The book up for scrutiny is Deborah Rodriguez‘s KABUL BEAUTY SCHOOL, whose tales of hairdressing in the midst of Islamic restrictions and fundamentalism propelled both book and author to bestsellerdom. Problem is, “Crazy Deb,” as Rodriguez refers to herself in the book, has raised the ire of six women who were involved at the founding of the Kabul Beauty School. The women say the book is filled with inaccuracies and inconsistencies. They argue that events did not unfold the way Rodriguez depicts them, and that she exaggerated her role in the formation of the school.

Though Random House notes on the copyright page that some personal, place and organization names have been changed, and some chronological details adjusted, Ellin explains, the women believe that the discrepancies are too vast to call the book a memoir. They even question whether the stories Rodriguez tells about Afghan women – disturbing, heartbreaking tales of abuse – are real. And they object to Rodriguez’s explanation of how she came to be in charge of the school, as she is today. They say that, instead of being its savior, as she represents, she plotted to move the school from the Women’s Ministry to the house she shares with her Afghan/Uzbek husband, Sher (called Sam in the book). And, they said, she did it for personal gain. “She couldn’t have a for-profit business at the ministry,” said Patricia O’Connor (pictured with Shaima Ali and Terri Graguel, left) one of the school’s founders.

So far, this isn’t quite in James Frey territory and everyone involved admits this isn’t a case of outright lying. But once again, we’re faced with the question of how much truth there must be in a memoir with no easy answers – especially as KABUL BEAUTY SCHOOL follows a pattern set in many true-to-life books and psychological accounts that tell stories with names changed and stories melded. Indeed, Richard Pine, a literary agent and partner at InkWell Management, said Rodriguez wasn’t bound by journalistic standards. “Journalists know about fact-checking,” he said. “Beauticians know about hair dye and shampoo.”