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Posts Tagged ‘Ron Charles’

Karl Lagerfeld to Develop ‘Paper Passion’ Fragrance

While your eReader can’t replicate the tactile feeling of paper pages, fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld can help it smell like print.  In a story straight out of an episode of Ron Charles‘ Totally Hip Book Reviewer, Lagerfeld  plans to develop a fragrance inspired by his love of books.

According to Times Live, European publisher Steidl will work with Lagerfeld (pictured) on this project. Steidl has distributed most of Lagerfeld’s photography books.

Here’s more from the article: “FAZ reports that Paper Passion, which will be sold inside a hardcover book with the pages hollowed out to hold the flacon, will be developed with Berlin perfumer Geza Schön, who told the paper that ‘the fragrance will have a fatty note,’ probably along the lines of linoleum, and that he was taking his inspiration from the smell of printed and unprinted paper.” (Photo Credit: Siebbi)

Washington Post to Expand Sunday Edition & Increase Book Coverage

The Washington Post will increase its Sunday edition paper by creating separate Arts and Sunday Style sections. Beginning with the January 23rd issue, book coverage will play a larger role in the modified Sunday edition.

According to Yahoo! Finance, two types of book reviews are planned. The Sunday Style section reviews will examine books that focus on pop culture topics and the Arts section reviews will focus on arts-related books.

Responding to the news, fiction editor Ron Charles posted on Twitter: “INCREASED book coverage in a mainstream newspaper! When’s the last time you saw that? (Maybe indie bookstores will come back too!)” Other changes will include a new KidsPost tabloid and a more developed Real Estate section.

Ron Charles on His T-Shirt Peddling Back-Up Plan

If the art of book reviewing ever fades away, Washington Post fiction editor Ron Charles has a back-up plan. The star of the Totally Hip Book Reviewer video embedded above will become a “bacon hat t-shirt” peddler.

In an Armchair/Shotgun interview, Charles explained: “Those bacon-hat t-shirts — and my Beanie Baby collection — are my Plan B when this whole journalism thing finally collapses. I’ve got 10,000 in a warehouse in Rockville. I’m taking orders now.”

The bacon hat originated in Charles’ video about Danielle Evans’ short story collection, Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self. It’s safe to assume that he drew inspiration from Lady Gaga’s meat dress. In his his recent holiday gift guide video, Charles introduced a t-shirt of himself wearing the bacon hat. (Via FishbowlNY)

The Totally Hip Book Reviewer’s Gift Guide

Need holiday gift ideas?

Washington Post fiction editor Ron Charles‘ Totally Hip Book Reviewer video series introduced three literary products this week: the bookly (a literary parody of the Snuggie), Spine perfume (the scent of the Library of Congress), and the Doogk (an eReader for dogs). The video is embedded above.

In Charles’ words, the Doogk is “the handy, beef-flavored, eReader for man’s best friend. And the tough raw hide construction provides extra teething pleasure no ordinary book can match.” Julie Klam, the author of You Had Me at Woof, makes a cameo with her dog, Fiorello, to endorse the Doogk.

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Ron Charles Reviews 5 Fiction Books in 5 Minutes

In his video series, “Totally Hip Book Review,” Washington Post fiction editor Ron Charles reviewed the five fiction finalists in the National Book Awards’ fiction category in less than five minutes. Warning: spoilers follow!

Charles devoted 44 seconds to Jaimy Gordon‘s Lord of Misrule,  a book set for November 15th release. He exclaimed: “Secret unpublished books? Those bookworm conspiracy theorists will be spinning in their cocoons!” Charles featured books with the same title, like  Rachel Caine‘s fifth Morganville Vampire novel, Kannan Feng‘s fantasy novel, and actor Christopher Lee‘s biography.

The other finalists received about 30 seconds apiece. Charles picked Lionel Shriver‘s So Much for That as the winner. Charles also noted that popular titles such as Gary Shteyngart‘s Super Sad Love Story and Jennifer Egan‘s A Visit from the Goon Squad were snubbed.

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Howard Jacobson Analyzed by Book Critics After Booker Win

Yesterday critics from around the Internet weighed in on author Howard Jacobson (pictured) and his Man Booker Prize win. This GalleyCat Reviews editor actually predicted another winner–so we spent the evening reading reviews of Jacobson’s Booker-winning novel, The Finkler Question..

Ron Charles, the Washington Post‘s fiction editor, wrote:  “The Finkler Question is really a series of tragicomic meditations on one of humanity’s most tenacious expressions of malice, which I realize sounds about as much fun as sitting shiva, but Jacobson’s unpredictable wit is more likely to clobber you than his pathos.”

Laura Miller, the book critic at Salon, tweeted: “Confession: I bailed on The Finkler Question due to boredom (and cuteness). Take my hat off to @roncharles for his perseverance.”

Alex Balk from The Awl wrote “Howard Jacobson’s new novel, The Finkler Question, is getting some of the best reviews that this underappreciated author has received in his career. If it’s even half as good as The Mighty Walzer—a personal favorite—I’m sold. If you’ve never heard of him and are curious, start with this profile. He also writes a very good column for the Independent.

Carolyn Kellogg from Jacket Copy tweeted: “All due respect to Jacobson, I would have been happy to see Tom McCarthy take the Booker. And with all that betting? I’m not alone.”

Taylor Lautner Cameo in Ron Charles’ Video Book Review

Ron Charles returned with a video review of By Nightfall by Pulitzer Prize winner, Michael Cunningham.

Charles explained:  “It’s a horny novel about the power of beauty to rouse us ennui. The publisher says By Nightfall is heart-breaking, full of shocks and after-aftershocks.” Read GalleyCat Reviews‘ take on the book here.

The video features a cameo by a Taylor Lautner poster and a Jacob Black action figure (modeled after Lautner). Charles also impersonates the novel’s art dealer protagonist by walking through an art gallery, museum displays, classical fountains, and modern art installations.

Reviewing Novel Reviews: Bright Lights, Big Review

Unnamed_148x237.jpgAs we continue our first week here at GalleyCat Reviews, here are a few notable book reviews from around the Internet.

Literary Celebrity Book Review of the Week: Bright Lights, Big City novelist Jay McInerney reviews a new book by Joshua Ferris. Here’s an excerpt: “With his second novel Ferris makes it clear that he has absolutely no intention, for the moment at least, of repeating himself or creating an authorial brand. In fact, it’s difficult to believe that The Unnamed and Then We Came to the End come from the same laptop.”

Most Philosophy-Packed Book Review Sentence of the Week: Ron Charles reviews a 36 Arguments for the Existence of God by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein. Here’s the sentence: “A Princeton-trained philosopher and a MacArthur “genius,” Goldstein can make Spinoza sing and Godel comprehensible, and in her cerebral fiction she dances across disciplines with delight, writing domestic comedy about Cartesian metaphysics and academic satire about photoelectric energy.”

Stickiest Review Metaphor of the Week: Megan Doll reviews Your Face Tomorrow: Volume Three by Javier Marias, a novel currently obsessing this GalleyCat editor. Check it out: “In All Souls (sort of The Hobbit to Your Face Tomorrow‘s Ring Trilogy), Marias writes of Oxford as ‘a city preserved in syrup.’ A similar thing could be said of Marias’s pickled prose-style, with its long, sinuous sentences and manifold digressions that can try even the most patient and trusting reader.”

If you think a book review you wrote should be featured for our audience, email GalleyCat a link.

Washington Post Mounts Books Experiment with Amazon

washington-post-book-world1.jpgThe Washington Post‘s business development unit just unveiled a new experiment–allowing readers to purchase books mentioned in the paper’s book coverage via Amazon.com’s (AMZN) Amazon Associates program. Book links on the site will go to a new Post store, where the paper will receive a percentage of any sales from Amazon.

GalleyCat asked Washington Post Book World‘s deputy editor Ron Charles for more information, but he stressed in an email that “I really don’t know anything about this program except what I read this morning in the press release. Advertising and editorial are kept entirely separate.”

We contacted the communications department with our questions, and they passed along a release with quotes from Goli Sheikholeslami, the Post‘s digital general manager and product development vice-president. The complete release follows after the jump…

Here’s more from the Post‘s release: “The Post‘s news and editorial departments are not involved in placing the links. Post store links are automatically embedded by a non-editorial team after a review is posted and regardless of the nature of the book review. Links to the store are clearly labeled as commerce links. ‘If this test is successful, we will consider expanding the range of product offerings and participating online retailers,’ said Sheikholeslami.”

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Washington Post Book World Podcast Needs Subscribers

washington-post-book-world1.jpgIn an email interview with Washington City Paper, Washington Post Book World fiction editor Ron Charles worried about the subscriber rate for the site’s podcast series.

Here’s more from the post: “There’s no concrete deadline for adding more subscribers, Charles says, or even a goal for how many it needs, just ‘a general mandate to make sure we’re concentrating our efforts on projects that are actually attracting an audience.’” Update: On Twitter, Charles says the podcast needs “about 100K additional subscribers.”

Featuring ten minute interviews with writers like Francine Prose, James Ellroy and Margaret Atwood, the show deserves some iTunes love. After Maria Arana retired, Charles assumed podcasting duties at the review.

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