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Posts Tagged ‘Ron Hogan’

Inside the Blogger’s Studio

More than 40 bloggers registered for the first ever blogger signing session at BookExpo America–including two GalleyCat editors. In this video, GalleyCat senior editor Ron Hogan chats with author Isobella Jade.

At BEA booth 4077, Firebrand Technologies is hosting autograph sessions, interviews, and Q & A’s with online literary curators. In addition, the company will give away two free Sony Readers to lucky participants.

Check out the schedule and read more here: “It’s clear from how quickly this idea went from concept to reality, that book bloggers need and want to create community-to-community relationships with publishers, retailers, and readers. This is an incredibly exciting time in publishing! We invite every publisher at BEA to review this schedule and mark their calendars, so they have a chance to meet the bloggers who are helping to sell their books.”

Party Like It’s 1975

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BEA week is like a business convention, county fair, prom, and class reunion all rolled into one for the publishing world. Like a business journalist, high school reporter, small town newspaper, and nerdy kid from high school all rolled into one, GalleyCat covered a few pre-BEA parties last night.

The night began the Melville House, Small Beer Press, The Feminist Press, NYRB Classics and Little Bookroom, and Stop Smiling Books party in Brooklyn. Melville’s publisher Dennis Johnson worked the bar all night, as agents, artists, writers, and journalists mingled on the raining evening.

GalleyCat concluded the night at the Overlook Press’ “Party Like It’s 1975″ party for Allan Tannenbaum‘s “New York in the 70s” photography collection. Gorgeous black and white photos covered the walls, and literati were packed elbow-to-elbow at the popular party. In the photo above, Details writer Ian Daly, Village People cowboy Randy Jones, Overlook’s Vida Engstrand, and GalleyCat senior editor Ron Hogan attempted to spell “YMCA” for posterity.

Customized Recessionary BEA Coverage

bealogo.jpgBookExpo America hits New York City next week, and GalleyCat editors Ron Hogan and Jason Boog will both be reporting from the convention floor, workshops, and parties all week.

However, we also understand that this is a BEA in the middle of recession–not everyone who wants to attend the conference will be able to attend this year. GalleyCat can help with customized BEA coverage.

Check out the BEA schedule–if you are missing the conference this year but want to follow an event, feel free to email GalleyCat. We’ll do our best to cover the most popular events and bring you the stories and videos you want to see.

GalleyCat Movie Theater

That’s an encore presentation of GalleyCat’s video about Hunter S. Thompson and Puerto Rico–where the young journalist wrote his novel, “The Rum Diary.” Actor and director Johnny Depp is currently adapting the book.

Every week GalleyCat editors produce a number of literary web videos, a bookish collection of author interviews, features, and book trailers. To help readers check out the content, we will occasionally feature some of the best content in the GalleyCat Movie Theater for your weekend viewing pleasure.

Last month, GalleyCat correspondent Jeff Rivera went backstage at the Literati-A-Go-Go! party. This month, Ron Hogan caught up with science fiction legend Ursula K. Le Guin for an exclusive interview about her work. To see more GalleyCat literary videos, follow this search link.

Five Million Copies of New Dan Brown Book Coming in September

db222.jpgAfter years of delay and anticipation, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group will release Dan Brown‘s “The Lost Symbol” this September with an initial print run of five million copies.

The new novel is a follow-up to the “The Da Vinci Code,” the bestselling adventure that sold 81 million copies worldwide. Brown’s editor, Jason Kaufman, hinted at a “new landscape” that could confirm GalleyCat senior editor Ron Hogan‘s suspicion that the book will focus on 2012, the much ballyhooed Mayan date for the end of the world.

Here are Kaufman’s comments, from the release: “This book’s narrative takes place in a twelve-hour period, and from the first page, Dan’s readers will feel the thrill of discovery as they follow Robert Langdon through a masterful and unexpected new landscape.”

#Amazonfail Furor Dominates Twitter

trend3.jpgEver since news broke yesterday that Amazon may be excluding books with adult content from bestseller lists and some searches, the Twitter tag #amazonfail has been the center of the Twitter-sphere’s attention–still the top-ranked topic, as that screen shot shows.

Even though one spokesperson told Publishers Weekly one Amazon spokesperson explained that “a glitch had occurred,” writers are still speculating. Jezebel has built a list of books that have been stripped of Amazon sales rankings.

Patrick Nielsen Hayden from Tor Books urged a little patience: “My own guess would be that it has nothing to do with homophobia and everything to do with the fragility of large organizations.”

Information Week writes “Don’t Jump To Conclusions About Amazon Homophobia.”

GalleyCat editor Ron Hogan had a personal take on the matter.

Mary Gordon Wins Story Prize 2006

Where there are literary awards, there is the Tishman Auditorium at the New School. And while the place wasn’t filled to full capacity, an enthusiastic crowd showed up for yesterday’s awards night, giving equal weight to bestowing its goblet prize and $20,000 cheque to winner Mary Gordon (for THE STORIES OF MARY GORDON) as to celebrating the short story. “It’s such an honor to accept an award for the short story, which is becoming somewhat of an endangered species,” Gordon said to open her acceptance speech, mentioning how many fine writers known for their story skills – like John Cheever, Katherine Ann Porter and Flannery O’Connor – all turned to novels because they were deemed to be the “real thing.”

But the readings by each of the three finalists and subsequent Q&As with Story Prize co-founder Larry Dark demonstrated the story’s ability to be real to the point of naturalistic (in the case of Rick Bass, reading “Her First Elk” from his collection THE LIVES OF ROCKS) or comically absurd (demonstrated with continued hilarity by Gordon’s “My Podiatrist Tells Me A Story About a Boy and a Dog” and George Saunders‘ speculative tale of a verbally idiosyncratic teen named “Jon”.) The biggest laugh came when Saunders admitted, upon Dark’s probing, that he does indeed laugh at his own writing, “but I never like to admit it because it’s absurd. Here’s this balding, middle-aged man reading something he likes and ‘oh isn’t this funny!’. It’s ridiculous.” What wasn’t ridiculous was how close the vote was; we understand judges Edwidge Danticat, Mitchell Kaplan and Ron Hogan had their work cut out for them, trying to decide between three excellent yet radically different collections—at least they only had three to deal with, after they’d been culled from a shortlist of 65 story collections that, in Dark’s words, were extremely difficult to pare down. “I actually had to stop reading short stories about two months before Larry gave us the finalists,” Ron said about his approach to the judging process, “because there was so many great collections coming out that I couldn’t think of any other way I’d be able to look at the actual nominees with a fresh set of eyes, not comparing them to everybody else. Since I’ve already read these three books, the first thing I’m going to do this weekend is finally crack open All Aunt Hagar’s Children by Edward P. Jones, and then I’ve got at least six others lined up after that…”

The Story Prize Names its Finalists

Fiction collections by authors Mary Gordon, Rick Bass and George Saunders have been named finalists for the third annual Story Prize, given to the year’s outstanding book of short fiction. Bass was nominated for THE LIVES OF ROCKS (Houghton Mifflin), Gordon for THE STORIES OF MARY GORDON (Pantheon) and Saunders for IN PERSUASION NATION (Riverhead.) The winner, to be announced at an awards ceremony at the New School’s Tishman Auditorium on February 28, receives $20,000. Finalists will each be given $5,000.

GalleyCat‘s own Ron Hogan was one of the three judges (along with author Edwidge Danticat and Books & Books owner Mitchell Kaplan) and has dipped into each of these collections, along with many other potential candidates, as they’ve been published over the last several months. “I’m looking forward to devoting a lot more time to these three authors in the following weeks,” Hogan said, “and I’m glad I’ve got two other well-informed judges to help make what will undoubtedly be a tough decision.”

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