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Posts Tagged ‘Rupert Brooke’

Downton Abbey Poetry Reading List

Do you love the mix of Edwardian drama and World War I scenes of the second season of Downton Abbey on PBS? Below, we’ve collected links to four free digital poetry books  from the period that you can download right now.

Over at the New York Times, reporter Julie Bosman covered how publishers are taking advantage of this popular show to promote historical fiction and biography.

One reader added this comment: “The poets who wrote of the horrors of World War I represent some of the greatest poets of all time. I’m not referring to Rupert Brooke, who romanticized the war, but to Siegfried Sassoon, Edward Thomas, and particularly to Wilfred Owen [pictured], who died a week before the armistice and whose poems are truly heartbreaking. Owen’s ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ is one of the best.”

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Mediabistro Course

Women's Magazine Writing

Women's Magazine WritingPitch and publish in women's magazines with the health director of Family Circle! Starting September 30, Lynya Floyd will teach you how to wow editors with stories they want and need for their publications. You'll learn how to workshop pitch letters to endure editors will read them, master the voice and tone of women's magazines, find sources, and connect with other writers in the industry. Register now!

International Protect a Poet Day

200px-Shakespeare.jpgThe world lost six poetic souls on this date over the past few centuries, making April 23 a good day to protect (and appreciate) the poets you love.

As the Guardian notes, two of England’s greatest poets died today: William Shakespeare and William Wordsworth. In addition Spanish novelist and poet, Miguel de Cervantes, Welsh poet Henry Vaughan, English poet Rupert Brooke, and American songwriter Harold Arlen all died on this date.

Here’s more from the article: “Poets are notoriously sensitive souls, of course, so it could just be that if you’re a poet death is catching, like flu. That would explain, in a pseudo-scientific way, the number of dead poets littering the ground on 23 April.”