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Posts Tagged ‘Sarah Crichton’

Ben Schrank on the Art of Compartmentalizing

Novelist and publishing executive Ben Schrank has mastered the art of compartmentalizing his life.

During business hours, he is the publisher of Penguin Young Readers Group Razorbill imprint, but he has maintained a writing life as well. Farrar, Straus and Giroux will publish his adult novel (Love Is a Canoe) in February.

We caught up with him to ask about how he manages to juggle these two different roles.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

FirstBook Launches New Campaign to Kickstart Reading

First Book, an award-winning nonprofit that gives children from low-income families the opportunity to read and own their first new books, has launched a new campaign, What Book Got You Hooked? to celebrate the distribution of First Book’ s 50 millionth book. Readers of all ages are asked to share the book that got them hooked on reading, then vote for the next state to receive 50,000 brand new books for children in need. The results will be announced in early August. Ron wrote about the campaign for PW’s BEA Show Daily late last month and got Michael Chabon, Leslie Schnur and Sarah Crichton to reveal the books that got them to read – and stay reading.

At the Edgar Awards

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If there was a theme to last night’s packed Edgar Awards ceremony, it would have to be the element of surprise. Like Jason Goodwin‘s Best Novel win, so surprising editor Sarah Crichton that in her acceptance speech, she admitted she discouraged Goodwin from coming over from England to attend (though she did attempt to reach him immediately afterwards by cell phone.) Alex Berenson‘s first novel win was deemed so unexpected that the book’s editor, Mark Tavani, expressed some degree of surprise afterwards. Stephen King’s speech was sharp and eloquent and almost happened prematurely, when, after a funny intro by fellow Rock Bottom Remainders Ridley Pearson and Dave Barry, King got up to speak (with standing ovation to boot) and was recalled – because Donald Westlake was supposed to speak first. Still, I rather doubt anyone in the room really minded the accidental standing O to one of the genre’s greats.

More scattershot highlights here, and Al Roker generally did a good job as emcee – and kept the ceremony moving so swiftly its 9:45 end time was likely a modern-day record…

Yes, Starbucks Has Changed Ishmael Beah’s Life

Josh Getlin at the LA Times follows former child soldier Ishmael Beah around as he signs books in Manhattan, the author’s profile growing in leaps and bounds ever since Starbucks made his memoir A LONG WAY GONE its second book choice. “This all hit me out of the blue,” the modest, soft-spoken writer said to Getlin recently, riding a cab to his first appearance on the tour, in a New York cafe. “I didn’t even know Starbucks sold books. They chose mine, and it changed everything. I wasn’t really prepared.” So far, according to Starbucks, the book has sold 37,000 in its chain stores to date – which matches up with the Bookscan numbers published here last week.

There’s the usual surprise from publishing types like Ira Silverberg (Beah’s agent) and Sarah Crichton (his editor) and some further insight into how Crichton handled the memoir in the wake of the James Frey scandal. The publisher asked Beah to vouch for the accuracy of his book, with its sharp recall of details and conversations. Crichton was willing to take the leap after Beah assured her that he has a “photographic memory.” He reminded her that he had grown up in a culture with a long-standing oral tradition and had learned to tell stories from memory around a fire – and so editing continued. Beah’s book — and his message — are primed for huge national exposure. But will Americans really be able to grasp what he’s been through? “I’m like any other 26-year-old,” the author said with a laugh, minutes before his debut. “A 26-year-old with a Starbucks tour.”