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Posts Tagged ‘Shaye Areheart’

Major Restructuring at Crown Publishing Group; Shaye Areheart Books Closed

crown.jpegToday Crown Publishing Group detailed a major reorganization at the Random House division, changes helmed by publisher Maya Mavjee since her December appointment. The division will be divided into three editorial units: “general interest trade nonfiction and fiction; branded/category books; and four-color and lifestyle books, encompassing our cookbook, design, syle, crafts, and visual arts titles.”

Along with the shift, the Shaye Areheart Books imprint will be closed–but publisher Shaye Areheart will continue to serve as editor-at-large. Broadway Books was hardest hit by the reshuffling as publisher Diane Salvatore and senior editor Lorraine Glennnon will both step down.

In addition, the Crown Publishing Group publicity department will now be unified with one leader, and executive director of publicity Katie Wainwright will leave the company. Finally, the publisher has named Tina Constable publisher of the new Crown Archetype imprint, Harmony Books, Crown Forum, and Crown Business (a new imprint that combines Crown and Broadway Business). Also, Tina Pohlman will serve as publisher of Three Rivers Press and Broadway Paperbacks

The whole memo is embedded after the jump.

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Marketing the Book After the Author’s Death

The New York Times’ David Halfbinger updates the status of Jack Valenti‘s memoir, whose publication came just weeks after the former MPAA boss’s death on April 26. Valenti had arranged most of the marketing and publicity opportunities himself and his passing left his publisher, Harmony Books, in a serious bind. The book was the imprint’s lead summer title, with an initial printing of 100,000 copies, and Harmony had bought front-of-store display space in the major booksellers for the two weeks before Father’s Day. “We had an enormous investment in Jack,” publisher Shaye Areheart said.

An investment that, even with Valenti’s daughter Courtney pitching in on the publicity front, may not pay off. While Bookscan numbers don’t tell the whole story, that only 1,000 copies are reported sold since its May 15 publication date isn’t a positive sign (though some industry insiders speculated to Halfbinger that pub date confusion could have contributed to slow sales.) Areheart said she regretted allowing Valenti to delay publication several times as he dredged up fond memories and thought up new chapters. “I kept saying, ‘Jack, let it go,’” she said. If she’d only stuck to a March date, she said, “he’d have been able to enjoy it.”

Valenti Memoir Still on Schedule for June Publication

After former Motion Picture Association of America president Jack Valenti died yesterday at the age of 86, we wondered what would be the fate of his memoir, THIS TIME, THIS PLACE, MY LIFE: My Life in War, the White House and Hollywood, which Harmony Books scheduled for publication this June. According to spokesperson Annsley Rosner, the memoir will be published as planned. “There are no words that fully capture the essence of Jack Valenti,” his publisher, Shaye Areheart said in a statement. “He was the life of the party and a man who accomplished so many great things over the span of his varied careers. I feel so privileged to have known and worked with him over the years and am deeply saddened that he will not be able to enjoy the publication of his memoir. He poured his heart into the writing of the book and was so proud of the finished product. Nobody could tell a story better than Jack and he had so many incredible stories to tell. The book is a beautiful tribute to a life well lived and a testament to his rightful place in the history of our country and the film industry. We will miss him.”