InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Starbucks’

Starbucks Builds a Library-Themed Pop-Up Store in Tokyo

In Tokyo, the design firm nendo created the Starbucks Espresso Journey pop-up store to help the coffee chain promote its espresso drinks–a coffee shop that looks like a library.

The library shelves featured nine books, each book sharing information about a different espresso drink. Patrons are encouraged to browse this coffee library until they find the drink they would like to order. Here’s more from the designers:

At the counter, visitors can trade the book for an actual espresso drink, but retain the book cover which tells them about the drink they have chosen, to use as a book cover, as they like. The reverse side of the book cover has been punched into a tall or short size tumbler insert, which can be used in a Starbucks Create Your Own Tumbler. The ‘library’ invites visitors to choose an espresso drink as they would a book, and verse themselves in espresso drinks as though quietly entering into a fictional world. Books and coffee are both important parts of everyday life, so we created a link between favorite books and favorite coffees. (Link via Book Patrol)

Read more

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

ReShonda Tate Billingsley Reveals the Not-So-Glamorous Side of Book Tours

In the short video blog embedded above, author ReShonda Tate Billingsley recorded the tough side of a book tour in a video entitled “The Not-so Glamorous Life Of A Touring Author.”

What do you think–is a book tour worth the time, money and effort?

Billingsley just appeared at Books-A-Million in Jackson, Mississippi to sign copies of her twenty-third book Say Amen, Again. Altogether, she has ten more book tour events over the next two weeks.

Sharing Books with our Troops

troopebook.pngTo honor our veterans today, we’ve collected links to share books with our troops.

The nonprofit E-Books for Troops will help you share your used Kindle with our troops overseas.

Through Operation Warrior Library, writers share hundreds of books with military personnel overseas.

A Story Before Bed offered 100,000 free story recordings for our troops–military parents can produce videos of themselves reading a story to their children.

Finally, the Kindle community has setup a discussion thread entitled “Happy Veteran’s Day!!”

The Corporate Side of Booksigning

When Kim Ricketts launched her Book Events company more than three years ago in Seattle, no one else was connecting authors with corporations like Starbucks, Microsoft and Real Networks in a formal way. Now these things are much more commonplace, but that isn’t keeping Ricketts from a hectic schedule that ends “by 11 PM or midnight,” as she tells the Seattle Post-Intelligencer’s John Marshall in a brief Q&A.

Her biggest success? “When those inside companies write to me and say things like ‘I used to think of myself as a reader and went to author events, but then I got too busy with my career or having kids, but now with authors at my workplace, it reminds me how much I love to read,” she says. “I like that conversionary experience. I am evangelistic on this point. That’s when I feel like I have won.” And as for what’s next, expanding what we do to other companies in other regions,” namely in Minneapolis, New York City, Washington, D.C. and Boston. In other words, expect a lot more author/corporation matchups to come…

Starbucks Selection #3: Oral History

The AP reports that Starbucks has chosen “Listening Is An Act of Love: A Celebration of American Lives from the StoryCorps Project”, a collection of 50 stories in an oral history project as its third book selection. The book, edited by Peabody award winner Dave Isay and published by Penguin Press, will go on sale at Starbucks’ company-operated U.S. stores beginning Nov. 8, the company said.

First-person accounts of daily life from StoryCorps contributors are broadcast every Friday on National Public Radio‘s Morning Edition program. The collection is archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. “There are so many genuine stories, spoken with such passion and character, that it was difficult to narrow the selection,” Isay said in a statement released by Starbucks.

Authors At the Workplace to Read, Not Work

The SF Chronicle’s Tamara Straus looks at the recent trend of publishers sending authors not to the bookstores, but to the workplace to tour. Since the fall of 2005, for example, Google has joined several large West Coast companies such as Microsoft, Starbucks and Yahoo in hosting authors for weekly, sometimes daily, book-selling events that were once the sacred realm of bookstores. Although writers have long given lectures at universities and community centers, growing demand for them at the office is forcing publishers to rethink the traditional author tour and inducing booksellers to create ties with the corporate campus next door.

“There are so many distractions out there,” said Yelena Gitlin, publicity manager for Bloomsbury Books, who started bringing authors to Microsoft and Starbucks in 2003. “It’s hard to get people into bookstores these days, so book publishers and sellers have to come to readers — and they are often at work.” And the approach is working, according to Kim Ricketts, who runs her own company organizing non-bookstore events in Seattle and San Francisco. “At public bookstore events, 10 to 20 percent of the people buy books. At corporate events, 50 to 80 percent buy books and attendance tends to be higher,” she said. Plus, some companies, like Google, buy the books on behalf of their employees, often in orders of a hundred copies or more.

Which may make some bookstores shake in their boots, but not Bay Area stores. “I don’t see it as a threatening thing. I think it’s a good thing,” said Karen West, events director of Book Passage in Corte Madera, which holds about 100 in-store author events a month and has been steadily developing corporate partners. “But if publishers become booksellers, that’s a whole other phenomenon. … Nobody wants to see that happen, and I think publishers are aware of that.”

Starbucks to Sell Books in UK

The news that Starbucks plans to sell books in its 450 UK stores should be no surprise, considering the success the coffee retailer has had in the US with its two book selections to date, Mitch Albom‘s FOR ONE MORE DAY and Ishmael Beah‘s A LONG WAY GONE. The Bookseller reports that the UK stores will start selling Beah’s book – published by Fourth Estate – beginning on May 21. The chain is believed to be in discussions with Nielsen BookScan to see if the sales can be picked up for inclusion in UK bestseller charts.

“We’re thrilled that Starbucks have chosen to sell Ishmael’s book this spring,” said John Bond, m.d. of HarperCollins‘ literary division, Press Books. “We’re really excited about working closely with them to help spread the word; this will mean getting more copies of this important book into the hands of more people.” And it means that UK publishers can start pitching Starbucks in droves for its next book selection…

We’re Going To Need a New Name for This

USA Today’s Bob Minzesheimer looks at roman a clef novels that the authors swear are anything but. Meghan Daum wonders if memoirists should even bother documenting their self-absorbed lives when they can walk into Starbucks and see Ishmael Beah‘s book for instant, sobering perspective. And SF Chronicle Book Editor Oscar Villalon wishes publishers would stop blurring the lines between fact and fiction because, he says, “all this legerdemain over categorizing books implies that there’s something second-rate about writing and reading fiction.”

Or, recognizing that this may be a distinct market, we could just come up with a brand new name for a brand new category of books that straddle the line, that present facts in a blurry way, with clear narratives but enough deviation to satisfy novel and non-fiction junkies alike. Blurry Books seems a bit over-the-top, and Crossover has other connotations altogether. I like Not Quite True (or NQT for the acronym happy) but suggestions are always welcome

Katherine Taylor Falls Into Chick Lit Bait Trap

In reading debut novelist Katherine Taylor ‘s interview with the New York Observer’s Spencer Morgan, I couldn’t help but be reminded of the first time James Frey made headlines, long before any charges of fake writing and fabrication were levied his way. No, I’m talking about the interview where he railed against Dave Eggers‘s A HEARTBREAKING WORK OF STAGGERING GENIUS in particularly profane terms, and then it turned out that Frey, like so many men of his generation, is a casual f-bomb dropper without any real malice attached to it. So where do you think that first interview, the one that got Frey in so much trouble, ran? The New York Observer, of course!

So what is up with the salmon tabloid charming opinionated (at best) or incendiary (at worst) from young, impressionable writers? In Taylor ‘s case, perhaps it’s the constant dangling of the chick lit carrot what with her novel – published by FSG this May (and an early theorized candidate for the Starbucks slot occupied by Ishmael Beah) – set amidst glamorous New York surroundings and adorned with the chicklit-standard cocktail glass, cigarettes and pink lettering. “But I love it,” she said. “It works, and I love that [the cover] looks like an old film still and that it’s an old-fashioned cocktail glass and that the woman is wearing dark nail polish, not something bright.” Besides, one has to cut Taylor slack if only for her closing comment: “Indecision [by Benjamin Kunkel] was ridiculously simple, I thought. And had it been a girl who’d written it, it would have had the pinkest cover in the world. It would have been the pinkest of all-time pink covers.” Can’t argue with that…

When Being Dooced Is Only One Side of the Story

Sometimes, even us freewheeling bloggers like to exercise a little restraint. Because reporting on publishing people getting fired for what’s clearly a case of going overboard on a small matter is, frankly, not the best use of our time and resources. But since Gawker‘s now gone ahead and presented their (extremely flawed) version of Jason Pinter‘s abrupt exit from Crown, it seems like a good idea to present a more well-rounded, if still somewhat unattributed account of what precipitated this event.

First, the obligatory disclosure: I count Pinter as a friend, someone who bought another friend’s book and has also written a seriously kickass debut thriller that is (deservedly) receiving a good deal of pre-publication buzz. So much for objectivity, but don’t take my word for it, see what agent Kristin Nelson said (albeit without mentioning Pinter specifically by name) late last week: “it’s so sad when I get the news of a departure. Someone I liked. Enjoyed working with. Knew their tastes and what would work for them. Now I’ll have to scout out whoever fills their shoes. See who gets added to the dance card.”

But I’m getting ahead of myself. When reached for comment, Crown publicity director Tina Constable would only say that Pinter is no longer with the company and had no further comments, but Gawker is correct that Pinter’s termination resulted from the now-deleted blog post comparing and contrasting Chris Bohjalian‘s B&N-related success to Ishmael Beah‘s Starbucks-induced sales. Sources indicate that Crown publisher and senior vice president Steve Ross ordered Pinter to take the post down on February 23, which he did. A week later, without any warning or any indication that there would be further action taken, Pinter was informed he had violated Random House’s blog policy and had one day – last Friday, March 2 – to collect his things, inform his authors that he would no longer be working with Crown and absorb what had just happened.

Sources indicate that Pinter’s termination was not an easy decision, as a visibly upset Ross, as well as publisher Jenny Frost, were forced to do so at the behest of more senior Random House brass. Such sentiments are understandable considering the post in question never even made mention of Bookscan numbers – that was added in later, by me, after checking with additional sources. And from what I understand, access to Bookscan is hardly proprietary information – it’s not like actual Random House sales figures were being bandied about or, in the last publicized case of an employee fired for blogging, actual criticism of Random House employees was made public.

If anything, Pinter’s firing has less to do with him and more to do with his now-former company’s woes. Laying off the bulk of their sales force and then openly lying about it? Getting rid of an editor here, a small department there and scrambling to do something, anything to compensate for not just a bad year, but Bertelsmann‘s overall shortfall thanks to buying back the 25 percent stake that a minority shareholder wanted to take public? In short, this is a classic case of corporate publishing at its cowardly worst, taking a passive-aggressive action that may cover their ass in the short term, but adds yet more grist to the public relations disaster mill in the long term.

So yes, GalleyCat wishes Pinter well. He has a book to promote soon, another due out in February and a third to write under contract, with more in the future. There are job offers to consider and options to mull over. Indeed, rumors of his demise are greatly exaggerated. And if anything, drinks are on us, not the other way around…

NEXT PAGE >>