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Posts Tagged ‘Steve Almond’

Cheryl Strayed Revealed as Dear Sugar Columnist

At an event last night, author Cheryl Strayed revealed that she is the writer behind the “Dear Sugar” column at The Rumpus.

People have speculated for months about the identity of the pseudonymous advice columnist at the online literary journal. Strayed is the author of Torch and the forthcoming memoir, Wild.

The New Yorker‘s Book Bench blog has an interview with Strayed: “My friend Steve Almond had been writing the column and he no longer wanted to do it, so he e-mailed me and asked if I’d like to take it over. It just so happened that I was in the midst of this tiny lull in my writing life—only days before, I’d sent the first draft of my memoir Wild to my editor in New York, and I was waiting for her notes. So when Steve asked I thought, ‘Why not?’ I said yes within about thirty seconds of receiving his e-mail and then about thirty seconds later I thought of all the reasons I really should’ve said no.” (Link via Sarah Weinman)

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Has Publishing Abandoned Male Readers?

n93101313918_8871.jpgOver at the Huffington Post, Tom Matlack, the co-founder of The Good Men Project, blasts publishers for being out of touch during the publishing recession–losing a valuable chance to connect with male readers.

He recounts his struggle to find a home for an anthology of first person stories about manhood. Ultimately, Matlack and his partner built a website and will publish the book themselves on November 15. The anthology will include work by Mad Men creator Matt Weiner, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Charlie LeDuff, and author Steve Almond.

Here’s more from the essay: “Fifty (that’s 5-0, including a who’s who list of the literary world) [publishers] turned us down. They told us guys don’t read, would never read any kind of anthology, and most certainly wouldn’t read an anthology about men. Apparently we are all mindless fools. The publishers also said they were focused exclusively on the ‘sure-thing’ celebrity books in the wake of deteriorating economics.”

Writers Remember Director John Hughes

C_1416950370.jpgFilmmaker John Hughes passed away yesterday, leaving behind a collection of classic films.

In 2007, Simon Spotlight Entertainment released “Don’t You Forget About Me: Contemporary Writers on the Films of John Hughes,” one of the first–we hope–of many books about the influential director. The list of writers in the anthology included Ally Sheedy, Moon Unit Zappa, Steve Almond, and Tod Goldberg.

Here’s more from the publisher: “Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, Weird Science, Pretty in Pink, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, and Some Kind of Wonderful are timeless tales of love, angst, longing, and self-discovery that illuminated and assuaged the anxieties of an entire generation. Fondly nostalgic, filled with wit and surprising insights, don’t you forget about me contains original essays from a skillfully chosen crop of novelists and essayists on the films’ far-reaching effects on their own lives — an irresistible read for anyone who came of age in the eighties (or just wishes they did).”

Daddies Dish the Dirt on Parenting

Trust the Boston Herald’s Lauren Beckham Falcone to craft a trend piece out of Neal Pollack‘s just-published memoir ALTERNADAD, Steve Almond‘s daddyblog for Nerve and other upcoming books like MACK DADDY: MASTERING FATHERHOOD WITHOUT LOSING YOUR STYLE, YOUR COOL AND YOUR MIND. Because – guess what! – daddy diaries are the new mommy memoirs, as the millennium’s first-time fathers confront the ultimate antidote to cool – a kid. “I’ve never been lumped into a genre,” said Pollack. “When I turned my blog into a daddy blog, I got this sense that there was a vast universe out there with similar concerns and interests.”

Of course, fatherhood led to bestsellers by Bill Cosby and Paul Reiser in the late 80s and early 90s, but as Publishers Weekly’s Karen Holt points out, “what you’re seeing now is the genre of the cool dad – people who always thought they were much too cool to be parents – trying to figure it all out. There’s a built-in conflict that makes for an interesting book.” But will the trend be successful, or will it suffer the same fate as its fictional cousin, lad lit? Holt admits the latter trend “didn’t work” but “this is more of an authentic experience that appeals to an older man in his 30s and 40s. It’s also a way for all of those men out there breaking new parenting ground – the hipster who still goes out, who has a career, who is a good father. They can see themselves reflected in books.”