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Posts Tagged ‘Susan Casey’

Susan Casey Tops List of Most Watched Author Videos on ReadRollShow

After nine months of shooting video author interviews, ReadRollShow revealed the most watched author videos of the year–an interesting peek at a new interview format.

The most popular video was an interview with Susan Casey about her surfing book, The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean. We’ve embedded the video above–the rest of the list includes everybody from Rebecca Skloot to Sam Lipsyte.

Here’s more about the video: “Laird Hamilton helped to invent tow surfing, where a jet ski, driven by a partner, tows the surfer to the start, enabling them to catch waves far bigger and faster than any they could catch by hand-paddling. Laird’s feats in the water are the stuff of legend. But then one event during Casey’s research surpassed all others.”

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An Author-Surfer Collaboration

The New York Times’s Motoko Rich reports on what may seem to be an unusual collaboration between an author and its subject. Susan Casey, a former creative director at Outside magazine, has just signed a book deal for about $1 million with Broadway Books to write about the science of giant waves and the surfers who try to ride them. To research the book, she needs help getting to the center of oceans where these waves erupt and where surfers try to catch them – an undertaking that often requires helicopters, wave runners and exquisite timing. So she is paying Laird Hamilton, the celebrity surfer who will be a central character in her book, to put her at the center of the action.

“I’m asking him to put me in the middle of his dangerously and logistically complex undertaking,” said Casey, whose previous book was about great white sharks. “It was inevitable that we would have to have some kind of incentive for him to do that.” She added: “He doesn’t need the exposure, and he’s past the point in his career when he’s going to do this out of the goodness of his heart.” And Stephen Rubin, president and publisher of Doubleday Broadway Publishing Group, said he had no problems with the arrangement, unusual but not unheard of in publishing circles. “He is giving her access to things that she would never have and taking time,” he asked. “Why shouldn’t he get paid?”

Sloan Harris Promoted at ICM

Publishers Marketplace reports that Sloan Harris has been promoted to co-head of publications at ICM, which in Variety’s words “essentially establishes him as heir apparent to run the agency’s Gotham-based powerhouse book operation in the years to come.” The 44-year-old agent will share his new title with Esther Newberg, who has run the book department with fellow EVP Amanda Urban since 1988. Urban is dropping the co-head role; instead, she will turn her attention to running the agency’s international book biz, especially the London office, which she set up several years ago.

Some of Harris’s most notable clients include Hampton Sides, Anthony Lane, Vince Flynn, Anthony Swofford, Michael Paterniti, Susan Casey and George Pelecanos. ICM co-president Chris Silbermann said in a statement that “Sloan has the best of both worlds here. He is a 17-year veteran who is at a time and place in his career where he’s stepping up and taking on managerial responsibility, a growth that has happened organically. At the same time, he is supported by Esther and Binky, who are two of the best publishing agents of their generation and who have built the preeminent publishing agency in New York. We are set up for future growth and a fluid evolution. This is about embracing change while keeping the stability that the department has always had.”