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Posts Tagged ‘Susan Patron’

The Rumpus Creates Letters for Kids Program

Over at The Rumpus, middle-grade author Cecil Castelluci will coordinate the new Letters For Kids program–a subscription service giving readers mail from authors who write for kids.

According to the launch page, participants will receive “two letters a month written by middle-grade authors like Lemony Snicket/Daniel Handler, Adam Rex, Kerry Madden, Natalie Standiford, Susan Patron, Rebecca Stead, Cecil Castelluci, and more.” The service will cost $4.50 per month for U.S. readers, and $9 international readers. The project will expand upon The Rumpus’ Letters in the Mail program for adults.  Check it out:

Some of the letters will be illustrated. Some will be written by hand. It’s hard to say! We’ll copy the letters, fold them, put them in an envelope, put a first class stamp on the envelope, and send the letters to you (or your child) … Six is pretty much the perfect age to start checking your mailbox for actual letters. And if you’ve waited until you were ten, well, you’re four years behind but still, it’s not too late. And if you’re sixteen, that’s OK, there’s still something of the kid left. And if you’re sixty, well… OK. You’re young at heart.

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Los Angeles Review of Books Taps YA Authors for Banned Books Week

The Los Angeles Review of Books (LARB) celebrated Banned Books Week with a series of essays by YA authors called “Getting Banned.”

The authors in the Getting Banned essays have all had their work banned or challenged at some point. Follow these links to read essays by Ron Koertge, Ellen Hopkins, Susan Patron, Sonya Sones and Lauren Myracle. LARB‘s YA editor Cecil Castellucci explained: “YA authors are on the front lines of today’s censorship battle.”

The web publication will also publish a two-part essay by English professor Loren Glass about the 1960′s obscenity trials Grove Press faced for publishing William Burroughs‘ Naked Lunch and Henry Miller‘s The Tropic of Cancer. Nickel and Dimed author Barbara Ehrenreich will also publish a Banned Books Week essay on Saturday.

Read more

New Website Instantly Tracks Meaningless Amazon Rankings

Are you an author who checks your book’s Amazon ranking obsessively? Do you not care that such rankings account for maybe 5 percent, tops, of total book sales? Then Aaron Shepherd‘s Sales Rank Express, a website that lets authors check their Amazon rankings instantly, is for you. “People want to know where their book stands, just for the thrill of that score,” said Shepard to the NYT’s Lyndon Stambler. Shepard’s own top seller, THE BUSINESS OF WRITING FOR CHILDREN, clocked in at 1,834th during one random check of Amazon last week, and at 2,070th during another one. He says it sells 250 to 450 copies a month.

How nice. But then Amazon rankings only have limited meaning in terms of guaging a book’s popularity or after some new review, controversy or exposure. When Susan Patron won the Newbery Medal in January for THE HIGHER POWER OF LUCKY and a controversy erupted over her use of the word “scrotum,” sales also rose – something she’d never thought about till then. “s a writer, I can’t be too concerned about that,” she said. “If it’s not the number you want, how hard is it to return to the keyboard? I just need to be writing the next book.”

Newbery, Caldecott Awards and More from ALA

The American Library Association has handed out the top books and video for children and young adults at its Midwinter Meeting in Seattle.

  • The Newbery went to The Higher Power of Lucky by Susan Patron, illustrated by Matt Phelan (S&S/Richard Jackson).
  • The Caldecott went to Flotsam illustrated by David Wiesner (Clarion).
  • The Printz went to American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang (First Second/Roaring Brook Press).
  • The Coretta Scott King Author Book winner was Copper Sun by Sharon Draper (S&S/Atheneum Books for Young Readers)
  • The Coretta Scott King Illustrator Book winner was Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom illustrated by Kadir Nelson, written by Carole Boston Weatherford (Jump at the Sun/Hyperion Books for Children).