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Posts Tagged ‘Suzanne Somers’

Kristen Wiig Reads Suzanne Somers Poetry

In honor of National Poetry Month, we dug up a video of Saturday Night Live veteran Kristen Wiig reading from Suzanne Somers‘ poetry collection, Touch Me.

For this funny performance embedded above, Wigg recited three poems: “Two Week Love,” “Extra Love,” and “The Quiet Loneliness of Being Alone.”

Wiig delivered this entertaining narration for an off-Broadway theatre project called, “Celebrity Autobiography.” This show features a rotating cast of actors and comedians who read directly from celebrity memoirs.

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How Well Do You Know Your Celebrity Poets?

9780061073625.jpgCelebrity book deals have always stoked passionate opinions among GalleyCat readers and one magazine has taken a special look at a particular sub-genre of this polarizing literary trend: celebrity poetry.

Over at Details magazine, a short poetry quiz urges discerning readers to connect celebrities with their enigmatic verses. The wide-range of styles includes work by popular poets like Jewel (pictured, via), Michael Jackson, Suzanne Somers, and William Butler Yeats.

Here’s more from the site: “Celebrity Poetry [is] a much-maligned and misunderstood American literary genre that’s enjoying a bit of extra attention right now, thanks to the rediscovered cosmic versifications of Michael Jackson. (Alas, yes, ’twas the late King of Pop who composed sweetly sublime lines such as “Planet Earth, my home, my place/ A capricious anomaly in the sea of space.”) Lyrical musings have put MJ in the company of poetic luminaries like Leonard Cohen, Rosie O’Donnell, Billy Corgan, Jewel, Mr. Spock, and Suzanne Somers. But how well, dear scholar, do you really know their work?”