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Posts Tagged ‘Ted Kennedy’

Tami Hoag and Ted Kennedy Books Star in Apple’s Academy Award iPad Commercial

Apple iPad fans around the country were watching television last night to see in the company would run an advertisement during the Academy Awards. The company ran the ad embedded above, featuring two iBooks titles–Tami Hoag‘s novel, Deeper than the Dead and Ted Kennedy‘s memoir, True Compass.

The Kennedy memoir is published by Hachette Book Group’s Twelve imprint and Hoag’s novel is published by Penguin’s Dutton imprint. The advertisement’s hypothetical user had eclectic tastes: shuttling between books, the NY Times articles about Florida, photos of kids, snowboarding articles, Google Maps pictures of Paris, and Star Trek.

What do you think? Will this new device save publishing? Or will this manic multimedia experience lure readers away from books? Read more at eBookNewser.

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NY Observer‘s Books Reporter Leon Neyfakh Changes Beats

New York Observer logo.gifNew York Observer publishing reporter Leon Neyfakh has shifted beats, moving from the book world to the art scene–marking the change with a new article about a Georgia O’Keeffe exhibition.

During his publishing reporting days, Neyfakh profiled celebrated novelist Rivka Galchen, carefully tracked the state of Rob Lowe‘s memoir, and covered one of publishing’s darkest days. GalleyCat caught up with the publishing reporter to find out more. Neyfakh explained: “I’m going to be covering the art world, which means I’ll be writing about museums, galleries, collectors, and more. In general I love knowing and writing about how cultural institutions work and the people who run them or otherwise come into contact with them.”

At the same time, Neyfakh stressed that he wasn’t abandoning the publishing beat altogether: “I don’t know how often I’ll write about publishing but I think it’ll be pretty regularly. I’ll definitely do it if big important events occur, like if that detective Hachette hired figures out who leaked Ted Kennedy‘s book to the Times or Brian Murray decides to start a new non-fiction division at Harpercollins.”

NY Times Breaks Dan Brown Embargo

the_lost_symbol-1.jpgFor the second time in a week, the NY Times has broken an embargo placed on a hotly-anticipated novel. Last night Janet Maslin published her review of “The Lost Symbol” on the site, breaking Random House’s embargo deadline of September 15, 12:01 AM.

In reviewing the novel, the critic somehow managed to evade 24-hour guards and closed-circuit television systems used to protect book’s embargo around the world. Last week the newspaper broke an embargo of Ted Kennedy‘s memoir, prompting Hachette to hire a private detective. On a somewhat related note, this is your last chance to contribute a catchphrase to GalleyCat’s Nickname Dan Brown’s Release Date post.

Here’s a juicy excerpt from the review, which GalleyCat hopes was obtained through a daring Mission Impossible-style midnight raid: “‘The Lost Symbol’ manages to take a twisting, turning route through many such aspects of the occult even as it heads for a final secret that is surprising for a strange reason: It’s unsurprising.”

Publicist Explains Book Embargoes

9780743274067.jpgBook publicists around the world cringed when the NY Times broke Hachette Book Group’s embargoes on Ted Kennedy‘s memoir last week. The company was so flustered by the break, that they hired a private detective to follow the trail of the leak.

In a new web essay, publicist Yen Cheong explained the logic behind embargoes and outlined the delicate procedures book publicists follow to keep embargoes intact in this difficult publishing environment. Cheong also explores the history of the book embargo, which some think began with Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward‘s 1976 book “The Final Days.”

Here’s more from the post: “In a world in which media outlets are all fighting to survive (and publishing houses are jockeying for shrinking book coverage), it’s not unexpected that access to a hot commodity would be limited. Enter the embargoed book. For book publicists working on embargoed titles, planning publicity campaigns and scheduling interviews becomes an intricate dance in which one false–if unintended–step can torpedo the relationships we work for years to build.”

Ted Kennedy’s Memoir Embargoed

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Today’s guest on the Morning Media Menu was Amanda Ernst, editor of FishbowlNY. During the show, she pondered, among other things, the press embargo of Ted Kennedy‘s upcoming memoir.

Hachette Book Group will put out 1.5 million copies of Senator Edward M. Kennedy‘s posthumously-published book, “True Compass.” According to the NY Post, pre-orders have already driven the book high up the Amazon rankings and the publisher has embargoed the book until the September 14 release date.

The book will hit stores one day before another carefully-guarded book–the Sept. 15 release of Dan Brown‘s new novel (author website here), a major publishing event that GalleyCat readers are busily nicknaming.