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Posts Tagged ‘Tom Lutz’

LA Review of Books to Publish Online Magazines

boomThe Los Angeles Review of Books (LARB) has plans to publish a series of online magazines under a new division which is called, “LARB Channels.”

The division will produce a number of new nonprofit digital literary magazines aimed at fostering culture around books and the arts. The first five are called: Boom: A Journal of CaliforniaThe Marginalia Review of BooksThe Levantine Review, Avidly and The Philosophers Plant. There will be more in the series.

“The Channels division gives us the opportunity to extend our support to other independent magazines who, like us, want to build a community around vanguard writing in literary criticism, politics, science, the arts, and culture” explained Tom Lutz, the Editor in Chief of the Los Angeles Review of Books, in a statement. “We intend for these publications to form a new, cutting edge literary collective in tandem with our flagship magazine, the Los Angeles Review of Books.

 

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How To Pitch The Los Angeles Review of Books

Are you looking for more places to read or write about literary criticism? Today on the Morning Media Menu, we explored The Los Angeles Review of Books, a growing online journal on the West Coast.

Our guest was founding editor Tom Lutz, explaining how the publication has grown over the last year. He also talked about how readers can support the new online magazine and how writers can pitch story ideas to the book review.

Press play below to listen to the interview. Lutz explained how writers can pitch the new journal: “It begins with a pitch from a critic. That pitch can go to this address: pitches [at] lareviewofbooks [dot] org. We look at everything that comes in. A lot of our best stuff comes from people I didn’t know until we started working with them.”

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Los Angeles Review of Books Gets $25,000 Amazon Grant

Amazon has given the Los Angeles Review of Books a $25,000 grant. The literary journal will use the funds to pay its contributors and launch the complete site.

Founding editor Tom Lutz had this statement: “Corporate underwriting grants like these are crucial to helping us realize our vision: to create and sustain the most innovative new multimedia forum for the vibrant, ongoing dialogue about books and culture.”

The grant was part of Amazon’s “Supporting the Writing Community” program, helping fund groups like 826 Seattle, The Asian American Writers’ Workshop, the AWP, Copper Canyon Press, The Lambda Literary Foundation, Write Girl and PEN American Center.

Joan Didion Week at The Los Angeles Review of Books

The Los Angeles Review of Books (LARB) dedicated an entire week of essays to Joan Didion and her new memoir Blue Nights. Six writers shared their thoughts about the new book; one essay was published each day this week.

The group includes LARB senior fiction editor Matthew SpecktorTake One Candle Light a Room author Susan Straight, literary journalism professor Amy Wilentz, Cool Shades author Amy Emphron and LA Times columnist Meghan Daum. The last piece, written by Los Angeles Without a Map novelist Richard Rayner, will be published tomorrow.

LARB editor-in-chief Tom Lutz gave this statement in the release: “Didion is an icon of literary L.A. despite living in New York much of her life. In 1976 she wrote that ‘[t]o shift the structure of a sentence alters the meaning of that sentence, as definitely and inflexibly as the position of a camera alters the meaning of the object photographed.’ That attention to style, structure, perspective, and meaning animates the essays we’re featuring this week.”

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