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Posts Tagged ‘Transworld’

Transworld Launches Ireland Division

Transworld, a subsidiary of Random House UK, announced today that it is setting up a new subsidiary company, Transworld Ireland, which will publish its first list in 2008. Eoin McHugh, currently Head of Book Purchasing at Eason & Son Ltd, has been appointed Publisher. McHugh will report to Transworld’s Senior Publishing Director, Francesca Liversidge, and will join the company in September. “We have enjoyed great success in Ireland and I’m thrilled to be making this commitment to major growth for Transworld in what is an exciting and vibrant market,” said Transworld m.d. Larry Finlay. “The time is right to develop our Irish publishing programme, particularly in non-fiction and the best way to do this is to establish an editorial presence in Ireland.”

“I’ve been very fortunate over the last number of years to have worked with a wonderfully professional team at Eason,” added McHugh. “The exciting opportunity, however, of joining Transworld Ireland in this new and challenging venture has been impossible to resist. I am delighted to have been offered this position and look forward to working with former and future colleagues in seeking to make it a great success.”

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Department of Obvious: No New Dan Brown Book in 2007

For the two or three people who believed Dan Brown would follow up THE DA VINCI CODE with something new in 2007, the Bookseller throws ice-cold water in your face. They only speak to the UK marketplace, but one would assume the same applies over here, since Doubleday will probably have first dibs on the finished manuscript over any other foreign territory.

Transworld publisher Larry Finlay said a Da Vinci follow-up had been budgeted in for 2007 but that Brown had yet to send any material. “It is in the budget, but it was in the budget last year. There is still a chance it will be this year; we just don’t know. He’ll deliver, I am sure, but I don’t know when. It will be published when it’s published.” Which is a lovely way of saying there’s no news, there’s no news on when there will be news, and the news of their being news will be news…eventually. How Rumsfeld-ian.

Publishing Happenings on Second Life

The Bookseller reports that The Random House Group held the first meeting of its virtual book group in Second Life yesterday (Tuesday), as the first step in a series of initiatives the publisher is planning to engage with the virtual world. Members discussed Audrey Niffenegger‘s THE TIME TRAVELER’S WIFE in the Rose Garden of the Elysian Isle, an area specially developed for RHG to host book-related events. “The book group is the first of a series of initiatives planned to engage with Second Life communities, creating opportunities for them to access and interact with our content and to meet our authors,” said Ros Lawler, digital marketing and publicity manager of Random House.

Meanwhile, Transworld announced that Richard Dawkins, author of the bestselling THE GOD DELUSION, will appear in a week of screenings to be held in Second Life, launching on Tuesday May 29th. Dawkins will appear on video, addressing the Second Life audience for 15-20 minutes. The video will run as a continuous feed, from 9am to midnight UK time, for seven consecutive days so avatars can attend the screenings whenever they like during this time. Outside the auditorium, Transworld have built two message walls, one for supporters of Dawkins’ thesis and one for the dissenters.

Dateline LBF: Earls Court Gets Thumbs Up

After the disaster that was the ExCeL center, the move to Earls Court this year (along with the unseasonably balmy London weather) is getting approval in almost all corners. Publishing News reports that exhibitors and visitors applauded the wider aisles – some even boasted plants – and the light and airiness of Earls Court. The building is a smoke-free zone, a fact that also won approval. Catering was praised – Vivienne Wordley, Commercial Director of Foyles, commented favourably on the quality of the food available at the tapas bar for example. A Transworlder thought the International Rights Centre looked like a battery hen coop but, more importantly, most of those actually using it felt positively about it.

The Bookseller also rounds up reaction from the floor. “The whole atmosphere’s wonderful. If you’re going to have an airless aircraft hangar, better to have it here than wherever that other place is at the end of the Underground line,” said Rachel Cugnoni, publishing director of Vintage. Will Atkinson, sales director, Faber added that he liked it so far because “at least I didn’t have to queue for 20 minutes to get a cup of coffee.” And Transworld‘s Selina Walker was most succinct: “It’s miles better than last year.”

Bringing Faber into the 21st Century

the Guardian’s Jane Martinson profiles Stephen Page, chief executive of the venerable independent publishing house Faber & Faber. The former sales & marketing director for various trade publishers like HarperCollins and Transworld is credited with bringing the “house that TS Eliot built” into the modern age with good reason, changing the packaging of the books for the first time in 20 years, a cause of much harrumphing in the shelving, as well as announcing a move into fast-selling general non-fiction and children’s stories at a company renowned for its drama and poetry. But Page believes any sense of surprise is based on misunderstanding commercial concerns.

He’s also skeptical about where technology fits with the book industry. “I am yet to be convinced that the technology is available to replace books. They are flexible, affordable, beautiful, lovable and seductive.” Yet he recognizes that the industry is still trying to find its way through a fast-changing world. “How do we make money online? We’re all trying to work that out.” But what he won’t have to work out is his own future plans, no matter how tempting the offers may be at other houses. “Faber suits me personally. It’s very satisfying, nourishing even. It’s like breathing.”

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda

Every year the Sunday Observer gets Kate Figes to ask various publishers what books they wanted to do well, but didn’t, and which they could have bought but didn’t have a chance (or turned down.) Said Transworld‘s Marianne Vellmans about Nina Lugovskaya‘s I WANT TO LIVE: “We worked hard to make the text accessible, as I believe there is nothing as effective to bring a dark period of history to life than this kind of eyewitness account by an innocent participant. We had fantastic reviews and some compared it to Anne Frank‘s Diary. But we sold less than 3,000 copies.” More fascinating was how certain books that were surefire sellers in America – such as Jeanette Walls‘ THE GLASS CASTLE – just about flopped in the UK. “I think it’s because it bucks the trend and doesn’t wallow in the misery,” said Virago publisher Lennie Goodings. “Some seriously awful things happened to her as a child but she chooses to write with pity.”