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Posts Tagged ‘Waldo Jaquith’

VQR Managing Editor Kevin Morrissey Has Died

vqrlogo.gifKevin Morrissey, the managing editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review, has committed suicide. The Charlottesville, Virgina-based editor was 52-years-old.

His friend and co-worker Waldo Jaquith explained in a post: “This morning, shortly after 11:00, my friend and boss Kevin Morrissey took his own life at the coal tower. He left his apartment, walked down Water Street and called the police to report a shooting at the coal tower, a shooting that actually came shortly thereafter. A lifetime of grappling with depression combined with recent stresses proved too much for him.”

Shelf Awareness has a short interview with Morrissey about the books and writers he loved. An excerpt: “I have to admit that I was one of those geeks who liked reading the encyclopedia, but I do remember devouring all the Henry and Ribsy books by Beverly Cleary.”

Jacket Copy has more details about the life and death of this literary journal editor.

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VQR Reporter Absolves Chris Anderson of ‘Malice’

canderson_free.jpgOur blogging sibling FishbowlNY landed a publishing scoop–interviewing the Virginia Quarterly Review journalist who uncovered unattributed Wikipedia passages in Chris Anderson‘s new book, “Free: The Future of a Radical Price.”

VQR writer Waldo Jaquith was reading an advance copy of “Free” when he checked Wikipedia for a reference question, and spotted some alarming similarities in the copy. Even though Jaquith was the first to discover these lifted passages, he told FishbowlNY’s Amanda Ernst that he didn’t see “malice” in Anderson’s actions.

Here’s more from the post: “Ultimately, Jaquith said he thinks Anderson’s description of the plagiarism as an oversight seems genuine. ‘I’m not able to peek into his motives, but you’d have to be mentally ill to do this on purpose,’ he said. ‘To assign malice to this would mean something was seriously wrong with him.’”