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Posts Tagged ‘William Styron’

When Should Writers Work for Free?

When should writers work for free? It is one of the most difficult questions facing writers in the 21st Century as unpaid outlets multiply online.

In an interview at The Paris Review, we found a historic moment when famous authors wrote for free in a completely unknown publication. When the legendary editor Robert Silvers launched The New York Review of Books in 1962, he went straight to the most talented writers in the country and asked them to work for free.

Check it out:

Our thought was to think of the best writers in the world to review the books of the season—even people who hadn’t written book reviews for years or ever. Many of them we knew—Norman Mailer, [William] Styron, W. H. Auden, Edmund Wilson. We said, “Look, we have three weeks, we can’t pay a penny, will you do it?” And they all did.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Susan Sontag Was Once a Struggling Author

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Today Farrar, Straus and Giroux launched its new multimedia Work in Progress newsletter with a feature on the late Susan Sontag–including the letter (pictured) that publicists sent to literary critics and authors to promote her first book.

It should cheer up all the aspiring authors in the audience–even Sontag was a struggling writer once. The entry also contains an audio clip from 2000, as Sontag spoke with Robert Stone and William Styron.

The newsletter features a conversation between publisher Jonathan Galassi and author Jeffrey Eugenides, as the publisher struggles to uncover the title of his next novel.

Here’s more from the post: “FSG has published Susan Sontag since her debut novel The Benefactor. Here are a few selections from an archive of almost fifty years of material. Note the pitch-perfect location for the Volcano Lover publication party, and the lines from the teenage Sontag’s diary on the back of At the Same Time.”

GalleyCat on Kari Moran’s BookRadio Show: “All About E”

bookradioshow.pngLast weekend, this GalleyCat editor joined radio host Kari Moran once again for her BookRadio Show. Tune in every Sunday at 3 pm PST for our “All About E” segment.

While the show airs on Los Angeles CBS-owned stations KFWB NEWS TALK 980, you can listen to the whole show online. Among the many topics discussed during the hour-long broadcast, we focused on Open Road Media’s work with the digital backlist of novelist William Styron and the future of digital rights. Follow this link to listen.

Last week’s episode featured Occult America: The Secret History of How Mysticism Shaped Our Nation by Mitch Horowitz and The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood, and Side By Side by Dr. Charles Sophy.

Random House’s Longest-Serving Editor Is Feted

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After reading Dinitia Smith‘s story about Robert Loomis, who’s just turned 80 and has spent a record 50 years as an editor at Random House, I feel very red-faced. Because Korda, Mayhew, Mehta and Gottlieb are names that trip easily off my publishing-wonk tongue, but Loomis? Alas, my industry vocabulary hadn’t included him – until now. But then, he’s an editor of the classic mold, content to stay in the background and let the spotlight shine upon authors such as William Styron, Calvin Trillin, Edmund Morris, Maya Angelou, Shelby Foote, Jonathan Harr and Pete Dexter.

“About 25 years ago, I began to think, ‘I’m a stick in the mud,’” Loomis told an audience of close to a hundred – including many of the authors he helped launch to stardom – in the trustees room of the New York Public Library last week, at a tribute celebrating his 50 years at Random House. “‘Why wasn’t I moving on?’” Why wasn’t he like so many other editors jumping from house to house in search of bigger, better opportunities? Because, simply put, he loved his authors too much, and if one needed years to write a book, he’d wait patiently for the finished product. But as for the retirement question, Loomis is quick to shrug it aside. “It makes people nervous.” He will always be attached to Random House, he said.