InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘writing advice’

Clyde Phillips to Aspiring Screenwriters: ‘Don’t fall in love with your first script too much’

During NYC Television Week MediabistroTV talked to Clyde Phillips, bestselling crime novelist and current showrunner for Nurse Jackie. He shares some advice for aspiring writers, and tells why novel writing is not that different from TV writing:

Mediabistro Course

Women's Magazine Writing

Women's Magazine WritingPitch and publish in women's magazines with the health director of Family Circle! Starting September 30, Lynya Floyd will teach you how to wow editors with stories they want and need for their publications. You'll learn how to workshop pitch letters to endure editors will read them, master the voice and tone of women's magazines, find sources, and connect with other writers in the industry. Register now!

Writing Advice From a 23-Year-Old Published Author

BeFunky_KaraTaylor.jpg

Kara Taylor is not your typical 23-year-old. While many young adults are struggling to find a job, Taylor has had the kind of early success most young writers only dream of. At 23, she has already released her debut novel, Prep School Confidential and is currently the co-executive producer and writer for the new CW show, The Revengers, created by Rashida Jones and Will McCormack.

Taylor recently spoke to Mediabistro about the pressure to churn out books, what her typical day is like (spoiler alert — she writes morning, noon and night) and how she broke into the world of TV writing:

What tips do you have for other writers who want to break into TV?
I think the most important thing — and this is hard advice because it’s not something that you can really learn — [is to] just have a voice and a point of view and focus on branding yourself, whether it’s [with] humor or whatever. Just be unique and be yourself, and write as much as you can. I obviously broke into it in a strange way because it was actually the novel writing that helped me break into TV. So I think it’s good to keep in mind that there’s not one clear path or way to break into the industry. You have to put yourself out there in all mediums and all aspects and not write anything off, and [don't] get discouraged, obviously. I was writing books for two years before I found an agent, and I heard a lot of nos. I must have been rejected by over a hundred literary agents with my first book. So if you’re expecting instant results, it’s not going to be the career for you. You just have to be patient and be in it for the long run.

To hear more about her incredible rise to success, read Hey, How’d You Become a Published Author and TV Writer at 23, Kara Taylor?

Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Writing Advice From Terry McMillan

Terry McMillan is the New York Times bestselling author of eight novels, including the now-classic Waiting To Exhale. Now, 25 years since her debut, she’s back with Who Asked You?, a multi-generational family saga that is already being applauded by critics. In the latest installment of So What Do You Do?, she tells Mediabistro about creating memorable characters, the challenges of writing from the perspective of an eight-year-old and the pressure of living up to all the hype:

You’re known for writing such authentic characters. How do you keep them all straight?
Well, first of all, it’s not as hard as you would think. If you take [people] that you know really well, and you had to capture them on paper — their gesticulations, how they talk, how they think — from what you know about them, you could do it. But before anything, I do a lot to profile my characters so that I know them. I know almost everything about them, in terms of their educational background, how tall they are, what color they are, what they like and don’t like, what their favorite class was in school, what they’re afraid of, what their biggest secret is, if they lie, if they pay their bills on time, what they wish they coulda, woulda, shoulda done, etc., etc.

To learn more about Terry McMillan’s writing process, read So What Do You Do, Terry McMillan, New York Times Best Selling Author?

Aneya Fernando

Pretty Little Liars Author Sara Shepard on How to Write More

In the latest installment of So What Do You Do?, Mediabistro talked to Sara Shepard, author of the bestselling YA series Pretty Little Liars and The Lying Game. The prolific writer, who has published 20 books in eight years, talks about getting her series optioned as TV shows, how she got into YA and how any writer can get more words onto the page:

“I am a big outliner. For my adult book, The Visibles, I did not outline, and it took me two years to write because I just didn’t outline and I had no path,” she said. “The other thing is, because I have really crazy deadlines, I have to write everyday. So, I can’t just sit there and stare at the page. So what I usually do is, I write something. Even if it’s bad, even if I go back later, and I’m like, ‘This is such a bad chapter, and I’m going to have to revise it,’ having words down is better than having nothing.

For the full interview, read So What Do You Do, Sara Shepard, Author of Pretty Little Liars?

Writer Resources & Book Pitch Contest Extension

ebooksummit23.jpgToday we launched a new “Writer Resources” category at GalleyCat, collecting practical tools for aspiring, published, and self-published authors.  To celebrate, we’ve also extended the deadline for our book pitch contest until October 27th–giving all those readers a chance to polish their queries for first ever Mediabistro Book Pitch Party on November 3, 2010 in NYC.

As you can see, GalleyCat now has five primary themes highlighted at the top of the blog: PublishingDeals Bookselling, GalleyCat Reviews, and Writer Resources. These categories will archive our content for the different parts of our audience. Feel free to share your thoughts about these new tools and check out all our categories for more specific themes.

We also encourage all the writers in the audience to enter our ongoing Book Pitch contest–a chance to win a free ticket to the eBook Summit in December. Our events team decided to extend the deadline for entries until October 27th to give everybody a chance to participate. Follow this link for all the contest details.