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Man Suspended From Job After Answering Phone in Robotic Voice

retro phoneApparently one man learned that answering a help line on the job in a robotic voice is not a good move.

According to DNAinfo, Robert Dillon was suspended for 20 days without pay, mainly for speaking that way to customers in the winter of 2013 on an information technology support line. Read more

NPR Issues Social Media Reminder to Employees on Election Day

flagWe first read about this NPR reminder on JimRomenesko.com and it’s worth repeating not only for Election Day but for any other day as well.

While many HR policies now include a social media one, it’s a powerful reminder that whatever you tweet or post will look like it’s essentially coming from your news outlet.

The guideline emphasizes: “The first rule of the day is simple. Just as “there’s no cheering in the press box,” it’s not appropriate to cheer (or boo) about election results on social media.” Read more

Schmoozers Can Save Their Jobs With Social Words Like ‘Baseball’

sportsHow about that big homecoming for LeBron James?

When it comes to sports, if you know a thing or two (and even if you don’t), as long as you talk shop at the office it could bode you well.

According to new research from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, if you message colleagues with chatchat such as sports or food, you’re significantly more likely to keep your job during layoffs. Read more

Three Things You Should Never Ever Do At the Office

multitaskingWe’ve all had bad days, we get it. So, how you react to a colleague’s inane conversation or a boss’s unrealistic deadline is key to your success. Reputations aren’t build overnight but they can certainly crumble in an instant.

According to this piece we saw on Monster, several factors stand out to keep your cool. In other words, avoid doing these four things at the office.

1. React to anything out of rage or spite. If you’ve ever responded within an instant to an email that made you completely irate, we’re with you. The next time you receive an equally disturbing message though, try to take a walk. Step away from the computer. And definitely breathe. Read more

Should You Pursue a Job For Love or Money?

happy signAh, it’s the million-dollar question. Should you pursue a job for love or for the money?

Here’s the thing: we don’t have the answer to that question since it’s all relative and it’s definitely all personal. It’s up to you to come up with the conclusion for yourself.

According to a piece on today’s New York Post, HR executive Gregory Giangrande writes:

“If you love the green — and work is just a means to an end — well, there’s your answer. But I’ve met very few people who aren’t doing what they love — but are earning a lot of money — who are truly happy in their careers.” Read more

Bestselling Author J. Courtney Sullivan Talks About Writing

chapters2Earlier this week we attended the WiCi Awards presented to rising stars in communications by New York Women in Communications (NYWICI). New York Times bestselling author J. Courtney Sullivan was among the honorees.

We sat down with the Brooklyn resident to hear how she juggled a day job with writing as well as rejections (yes, even bestselling authors get rejected).

MediaJobsDaily: So many of our readers have a day job and a novel inside them trying to bust loose. How did you originally pursue your path?

J. Courtney Sullivan: When I was writing my first novel, Commencement, I worked at the New York Times, I was a researcher for Bob Herbert, one of the op-ed columnists there. I wrote for the paper and I also had previously worked at a women’s magazine, Allure. So, I still wrote for Allure and a lot of other women’s magazines, freelancing. My fiction writing was something I really only had time to do on the weekends, sometimes at night after work and it was really just kind of like a labor of love, it was something I had to do on my free time.

It wasn’t until that Commencement was published and that I had sold Maine to my publisher that I then left and since then it’s been my full-time job. I wrote all of Commencement and the first half of Maine while I had a full-time job.

MJD: How did you deal with rejections?

JCS: I’ve had no rejection ever, just kidding. Rejection is just part of the game and it never ends. I think all of the earlier rejections you get are toughening you up for later on.  I think they’re really important. I submitted countless short stories to literary magazines, never did I have one published. I received so many rejection letters I can wallpaper this room with them. I still have a lot of them and the difference between a form rejection letter and one that was written by hand, “We like this but it wasn’t for us, keep sending us things” — that would just make your week.

There’s good rejections and there’s bad rejections. I would have those good rejections – I still have them in a box under my bed. But even now I’ve published three novels but I pitch things all the time – a magazine story or a newspaper story that just doesn’t work for some reason. Or I write a whole section of a novel before I realize these 100 pages just aren’t going anywhere.

You can add to that bad reviews or any level of rejection. There’s never going to be an artistic experience that’s totally positive, that everyone loves and adores. You just have to kind of accept it.

MJD: Let’s talk about your book, The Engagements, being made into a movie. Any involvement with it?

JCS: I’m really not involved. Occasionally they’ll ask me a question but for the most part, I have nothing to do with it which I’m actually pretty happy with. I’m primarily interested in writing fiction and I’m excited to be onto the next novel. I’m excited to see what they do with the book. I don’t know when it’s coming out yet but I think it’s the kind of thing where — being a lover of books and movies and seeing so many movie adaptations of books, some great and some not so great — I think you kind of have to give it over and just know it’s a totally different thing.

MJD: What’s your next book about?

JCS: An Irish Catholic family in which the matriarch has passed away and her six kids and her long-lost sister all come back together and drama ensues.

Vault Survey Reveals Top Internships for 2015

summer internsIf you’re going to be an aspiring intern in 2015, this post’s for you. Vault released a list of the top employers for interns in the upcoming year based on recent survey results. They invited more than 500 organizations to participate in their annual Internship Experience Survey.

Essentially the survey asked current and former interns to comment on their internship experiences. Plus, they were asked to rate them. On a scale of 1 to 10, approximately 5,800 interns from 100 different internship programs rated their experiences in terms of quality of life, benefits and compensation, the interview process, career development and full-time employment prospects. Ratings were averaged into an overall score for each program.

As for the best media and telecommunications internship? Read more

Five Job Seeking Tips for Disabled Workers

media-fieldsNeed some inspiration? Look no further. According to Next Avenue, Kate Williams, runs an employment program in San Francisco.

The 72-year-old blind woman told the site, “I have an opportunity to let people know that life is not being defined by your disability, but your ability.”

Here are several of her recommendations for disabled job seekers, in particular for the blind and visually impaired.

1. Start with a positive mindset. In the piece she said, “You have to get out of the ‘I can’t do it. I’m not capable’ mentality.”

2. Target a company where you really want to work. Next, network to find someone you know who works there. Read more

Four Types of People to Avoid Being at the Office

menandwomenjpgAccording to our friends at Brazen Careerist, there are a few types of people at the office you don’t want to be.

1. The good-old-days guy or gal. Are you surrounded by people (or even one person) who constantly talks about the good ol’ days? Do they rely on nostalgia to get them through the day? Maybe that’s because he or she wants you to know how long they’ve been working there and subliminally, how resistant they are to change.

So, if you are this person, the piece suggests asking yourself if you resist change in your work environment. If so, ask questions to gain further insight and identify benefits to a new process. In turn, this will help you adapt to the change. Read more

Pilot Passes Sobriety Test; Airline Grounds Passenger for Tweeting

airplaneWe’ve heard about employers slapping the wrist on employees for scribing questionable tweets but in a recent case, an airline sent a passenger packing when she tweeted about one of its employees. Namely, the pilot.

According to AOL Jobs, a passenger says she was removed from a JetBlue flight after sending a tweet. Not just any ol’ tweet — it was about a pilot’s sobriety test.

Here’s the deal: Lisa Carter-Knight from Pennsylvania was waiting to board her flight in Philadelphia. During that time, the airline mentioned it was delayed due to a unique set of circumstances. That is, the pilot believed another passenger actually accused him of being drunk. Read more

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