It’s a major job conundrum, isn’t it? Looking for a job can feel like a full-time job and yet when you’re already gainfully employed, looking for a new gig can feel a bit overwhelming. Fortunately, there are a few ways to effectively manage the process.

As pointed out in a post on CareerBuilder, the first pointer recommends not slacking off. For obvious reasons, you don’t want your search to seem like it’s not confidential or that you’re lacking interest in your current job. The key to success while juggling a job and the search? Staying focused on your current responsibilities to the best of your ability given the fact you may already be mentally checked out. In the piece, Anthony Balderamma writes, “But until you’ve accepted another offer, don’t neglect your current duties.”

Second, keep your search to yourself. Even though you may feel close to a few colleagues, it’s better to keep your lips sealed. Case in point: A job seeker gabbed to her colleagues that she was unhappy and looking to relocate and land a new job. Well, during her external search she got promoted! Cue resentment from colleagues here.

The search should also be confidential to your own computer at home. Balderamma writes in the piece, “When you’re eager to ditch your current job or you’re just bored sitting at your computer, you might think browsing job postings on the clock is acceptable. That’s not true. Your employer probably has a policy against job searching on the company dime, so don’t risk your job.”

Keep in mind, all bets are off if layoffs are imminent and your boss has told the group the hammer’s going to fall (or is it ax? We digress). Use your discretion but in that instance, it may be a given that you’re openly looking for a job without having to sneak out at lunch time to schedule job interviews.

Lastly, leverage your current job to get a new one. Considering networking is the one-two punch in job searching, if there’s a media conference you can attend through your current job, by all means, register! If you can register for a class on the company’s dime and time, go for it! You see what we’re getting at: You’re adding new contacts to your arsenal and bolstering your resume with new skills.

Plus, branching out may put a new spring in your step and nothing speaks more highly of yourself during an interview than a positive attitude.