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Posts Tagged ‘Gregory Giangrande’

The Scoop on Protecting Your Own Data On Your Company’s Phone

mobile phonesBack in the day, if you left your job you really only had to be concerned about your online files and some occasional hard copy ones. Well, corporate devices complicate things because they’re technically owned by your employer.

And yet when you leave, regardless of where the data resides, the device needs to get returned. Should you keep personal items on your device? Shouldn’t you also be able to keep the contacts’ information, too? Read more

Taxi Cab Wisdom: Networking Anywhere & Everywhere (Back Seats Included)

taxi cabA piece in today’s New York Post got us thinking. A taxi cab driver wrote into the career advice column saying he wants to get an office job.

It reminded us of old school networking basics. Striking up a conversation with folks anywhere and everywhere and having your elevator pitch ready at all times. Read more

How to Tactfully Ditch Your Current Mentor & Ask For a New One

mentorsPicture it. You’re assigned a shiny, new mentor. They’re older, wiser and look at that! An executive as well.

The only issue? He or she is into gossip, seems political and simply doesn’t share the same point of view that you do. What should you do?

According to The New York Post, keep in mind the essence of a successful relationship. For a mentoring relationship to be effective for both the mentor and mentee, there “needs to be trust, rapport and respect.” If you don’t get a good vibe or even if their busy schedule makes them completely inaccessible, it may be time to cut your losses and move on. Read more

How to Handle an Impractical Boss

listenDo you have a boss who’s a bit out of touch with reality? If so, listen up.

A piece in today’s New York Post will be right up your alley. The good news is having an unrealistic boss can force you outside your comfort zone.

Gregory Giangrande, HR executive in the media industry, writes in the piece, “Sometimes a boss’s expectations are unrealistic, but sometimes employees don’t realize what’s possible until they are pushed beyond their comfort zones.” Read more

Is it Age Discrimination if You’re Asked to ‘Think Younger?’

job economistsAge discrimination. Ugh. That is, two very ugly words.

We read this piece in the New York Post and simply cringed. After all, a reader wrote in to inquire if it was age discrimination when his or her boss asked the reader to “think younger.”

The fact that the 50 year-old marketing director pondered the question meant there was an inkling that discrimination’s present.

That said, Gregory Giangrande, human resources executive in the media, doesn’t think the director should speed dial an attorney just yet.

Read more

Should You Hire a Career Coach?

Job-SearchWe know the feeling all too well.

You’re in a job just itching to get out, you’re putting feelers out all over the place to network and you’re getting a little anxious. We get it.

According to a piece in The New York Post, one parent wanted advice as to whether or not he or she should enlist the services of a career coach for his or her job hunting daughter.

Gregory Giangrande, human resources executive in the media industry, suggested exhausting all of your free resources first. Ask your friends and family for advice, reach out to career services at your alma mater and ask for informational interviews.

He writes, “There are few absolutes in the job search, but one is never to pay for a headhunter or job placement firm. They make money placing you. For the average job seeker, I’d exhaust all other free advice from those in your network before retaining the services of a coach.”

 

How to Handle Working for Family-Owned Employers

Ah, the family business. If you’re not a family member but you’re employed by small business owners who are related and often squabble, proceed with caution.

As per a piece in today’s New York Post, there are a few pointers to keep in mind. For starters, avoid getting drawn into their own disputes.

Human resources executive and columnist Gregory Giangrande writes:

“Remember, no matter what, you’re not family. You’re not going to inherit the business. You are an employee, and you have no more business getting involved in personal family disputes that spill over into business than you do as their guest at Thanksgiving dinner trying to referee a holiday family smack-down.” Read more

Monday Management Tip For New Bosses: How to Get Your Team On Board

Happy Monday one and all! If you’re a new boss to a group, listen up. A few of your employees may not be on board and thanks to some tips in today’s New York Post, there are a few strategies to consider.

Gregory Giangrande, an executive human resources officer in the media industry, explains the first key is evaluating one’s staff to identify strengths and weaknesses “while articulating a vision and strategy for what needs to be accomplished.”

If you really want your team to succeed and thrive (and who doesn’t, right?), you’ll need to let them feel like their contributions count. Per the piece he points out, “But in order for a team to really thrive andthe business to succeed, people need to be bought in and feel passionate about the goals and strategy—otherwise they can’t put forth that discretionary effort to really make a difference.”

If they still maintain a poor attitude, then one bad apple may indeed spoil the bunch. He adds, “Threats don’t work, but if they’re not ‘all in,’ you’d do better to have them all out.”

How to Handle a Bully Boss

If you’ve ever been bullied by a boss, you know the dreaded pit in the stomach feeling. After all, they’re an authority figure and it may not seem so easy to stand your ground. You should feel empowered though knowing you don’t have to put up with it!

According to a piece in today’s New York Post, there are a few ways to handle the situation.

For starters, columnist and human resources executive Gregory Giangrande explains, “First, you want to make sure your new boss really is a bully. Some people confuse bullying with hard-driving, high-performing execs who have little tolerance or patience for poor performance.” Read more

The Scoop on Sick Days: Privacy Rights & What You Need to Know

It’s not atypical to call out sick. After all, we’re all under the weather from time to time. The question though is what happens when your employer asks for medical certification during this time to document it.

Well, today’s New York Post tackles the topic in reference to a reader asking if this violate’s his or her privacy.

Here’s the scoop: The information your health care provider may share falls within the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. This includes the specific type of information it may disclose, to whom and when.

In the piece, human resources executive Gregory Giangrande writes:

“It generally doesn’t govern what questions your employer asks. In fact, your employer is permitted to ask you for a doctor’s note or other information about your health if the information is needed to administer sick leave, workers’ compensation, wellness programs or health insurance. However, your doctor may not disclose such information to your employer without your written consent. It is unlikely your employer is asking why you can’t work and more likely they just want medical certification that you are unable to work.”

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