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Posts Tagged ‘job postings’

New Research Says 50 Percent of Jobs Are Not Posted Online

Find a JobThis just in…according to folks at TheLadders, 50 percent of available jobs at the manager, vice president and C-level continue to not be posted online.

This means, of course, companies and their external recruiters, don’t even need to advertise these highly coveted positions and in turn, job seekers without a foot in the door are being left out. Read more

Mediabistro Course Social Media 101

Get hands-on social media training for beginners in our online boot camp, Social Media 101! Starting September 4, social media and marketing experts will help you determine the social media sites that matter most to you, based on your personal and professional goals. Hurry, this boot camp starts next week! Register now!

The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

Need More Proof to Network? Zappos Received 31,000 Applicants & Hired 1.5 Percent

resume mistakesWe read this post on ERE and had an a-ha moment to share with you. Having been on the other side of the desk working directly with candidates, we know the feeling of seeing hundreds upon hundreds of resumes stacked up in the applicant tracking system.

But here’s proof that we just have to share. Mike Bailen, head of talent and senior HR manager at the Zappos Family of Companies indicated Zappos received more than 31,000 applicants last year. Read more

How to Read Between the Lines of a Job Posting

Job seekers should always have their detective hats on: You never know what valuable insights you may glean from a job posting. Scrutinizing the language typically used on job boards can also offer useful information that will help you land and ace an interview. In the latest Mediabistro feature, job experts help you decipher and take advantage of the hidden signs. Check out an excerpt:

What Does “Other Duties as Assigned” Mean?

“Ending job posts with the line ‘other duties as assigned’ often means that the hiring manager doesn’t know exactly what he wants,” said Vance Crowe, CEO of Articulate Ventures, a St. Louis-based communications firm. “But these should be signals to job seekers that management will value your willingness to do the less desirable work.”

So, how do you sell yourself if the hiring manager is flexible about the duties? Get all the advice in How to Read Between the Lines of a Job Posting. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Is Twitter Replacing the Traditional Job Posting?

We’ve seen it all too often here at MediaJobsDaily.

Companies post a job on their own Web site only to get candidates via Twitter after their in-house recruiter mentions a few available opportunities.

And as per a recent post on Harvard Business Review, engaging with candidates via social media isn’t only wise for job seekers, it’s smart for companies as well.

Although the piece is written with the employer in mind, on the flip side it’s beneficial for job seekers as well. Why not take advantage of following companies on Twitter and trolling their feed to get your foot in the door? They’ll get to know you on a more personal level than blindly submitting a resume through the job posting channels.

Roy Bahat writes in the piece, “If candidates do engage with you through social media, you’ll also have an equally immediate way of getting to know them — in a personal, verifiable way.”

He adds, “And, most important, they will feel some connection with you and your company before you even start talking with them. They will have a sense of your idiosyncrasies and your passions.”

Although we’re not suggesting to not apply online, we’re just emphasizing the importance of social media.

In particular, it’s in an employer’s best interest to see who’s tweeting them because they’re actively engaged in the company’s daily movements. Plus, considering recruiters need to peruse countless resumes in their applicant tracking system, a tweet or two here and there would help candidates stand out from the pack.

Bahat points out, “You spend a lot of time screening mediocre candidates only to learn that many of them barely care about what you do.”