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Posts Tagged ‘magazine pitch’

7 Mistakes Every Freelancer Should Avoid

freelancer mistakes

Humility is a virtue that shouldn’t be forgotten at any stage, in any profession — including freelance writing.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, veteran freelancers talk about mistakes they made and learned from:

Assuming you’re so brilliant that readers will just fall into your lap.

“Magnum opus to ‘filler article about diaper rash’ writing is 100 percent reader driven,” said editor and writer Suzann Ledbetter Ellingsworth. She reminds new writers that even when professionals speak about how they really only “write for themselves,” they’re usually saying it at a promotional event, with the intention of selling their writing. Truly successful writers write with their audience in mind: Their readers’ needs and wants always come first.

For more veteran tips on navigating the freelance world, read 7 Mistakes Every Freelance Writer Should Avoid.

Sherry Yuan

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Rookie Mistakes to Avoid When Freelancing

rookie freelancingFreelance writing: a quick and easy way to write about whatever you want, for whoever you want — all from the comfort of your own home.

If you think the statement above is accurate, prepare yourself for a big shock. Like any job, freelancing has both its pros and cons. In the latest Mediabistro feature, we talk to veteran freelancers to find out how they manage the trials of the freelancing life:

The worst thing you can do, in my opinion, is send a sloppy pitch letter or poorly edited piece to your dream publication. This isn’t to say you shouldn’t challenge yourself to pitch venerated publications, especially if you’re very familiar with what they publish. But it’s much easier to build your body of work, get some help editing your pitch or story and then submit to The New Yorker than to fire off a submission at two in the morning on a wine-induced whim. Create a strong first impression rather than spending time and energy recovering from a bad one.

For more researching tips and organizing ideas, read The Rookie Guide to Freelancing.
Sherry Yuan

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

6 Tips for Landing Repeat Writing Assignments

As Sara Horowitz, founder of the Freelancers Union, once said, “One of the challenges for all freelancers, though, is it can be feast or famine.” Sometimes you could be raking in the assignments; at others, editors could be strangely silent when you want to hear from them the most.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, magazine veterans give tips on how to foster your relationships with editors to keep the assignments, and the paychecks, rolling in.

Read more in 6 Tips for Landing Repeat Writing Assignments.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

The Top Reasons Editors Reject Pitches

The benefits of being a freelancer are plenty — flexible hours, working from home and being your own boss, just to name a few. But it brings its own set of challenges, and dealing with rejection might be the toughest one. A pitch that you’ve spent a lot of effort crafting could be met with silence, or a meager “Thanks, but no” response.  Luckily, not all hope is lost, and there’s always room to learn from your rejected pitches.

In the latest article for Mediabistro’s Journalism Advice series, freelance writer Kristen Fischer dissects some of the typical rejection responses that editors are known to give. Did you know that “we’re not assigning features at this time” is editor-speak for “Try pitching front-of-book pieces instead?”

For more on how you can learn from rejected pitches, check out The Real Reason Your Pitch Was Rejected. [subscription required]