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Posts Tagged ‘NBC’

Forbes’ New Advertising Pitch | The Demon Blogger of Fleet Street | And Other Stuff That Happened Over the Weekend

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Condè Nast Fails a Drill While 30 Rock Has More Plotline Fodder, Plus Other News of the Day

- Condè Nast employees received quite the email today, when a company-wide alert was sent out saying “We have received reports that a firearm has been discharged on the 10th floor of 750 building, 3rd Avenue in New York. If you are in a safe location, remain where you are,” reports Gawker. Minutes later, staffers received another alert, saying “Conde Nast Security Operation Center apologizes for a message received initially of reports of an active shooter at 750 3rd avenue. The message was sent in error. It was a department drill. Please accept our apologies. Please disregard.” Worst drill ever? Possibly.

- Publisher of the Denver Post Dean Singleton really wants to give his son, 18, every opportunity to get into the journalism game. He even went as far as to email people within the paper, asking for their help in showing the kid the ropes (as long as it’s not too late on a school night). According to the email obtained by Westword, “He [the son] can work a later shift, but Mon-Thur are school nites, so the aim is not to be too late getting him to bed — say 9 p.m . the latest…He does not drive, so it needs to be an assignment easily accesible via public transportation… or the staff member needs to pick him up and return him to the Post building.” Jeez, asking much? Who’s not going to jump at that opportunity?

- After 30 years at Bloomberg Businessweek, managing editor Ciro Scotti has decided to step away from the magazine. He didn’t specify where he would head next, but it seems like he’s leaving on good terms. “I’m going to skip the boilerplate about a great ride and smart people,” said Scotti in his farewell email. “The richness of my memories at BusinessWeek deserve more than a passing line, and if you weren’t brimming with brains and possibilities, believe me you wouldn’t be here.” Now that’s how you exit.

- Two other high-profile departures occurred today. First CNN fired its president of U.S. operations Jonathan Klein and replaced him with Ken Jautz, head of CNN’s sister channel HLN. Klein had stood at the top for six years, but CNN’s ratings decline meant this was only a matter of time. Also CEO of NBC Universal Jeff Zucker announced he would step away from the company once NBC completes the sell with Comcast. I just wonder how this will be worked into 30 Rock’s storyline?

NBC Co-Opts Newspapers

Yesterday it was the magazine industry debating the journalistic ethics of advertise on the cover of magazines. Today the Los Angeles Times has taken this debate one step further by creating a front page ad that looks almost identical to a story the newspaper might actually run.

Here is what the front page of the paper looks like today:
lat-front-page-ad.png

Can you spot the ad? Designed to help NBC promote its new cop drama “Southland” the “story” (aka advertorial) begins with the lede “It’s not every assignment that puts you in the back of a squad car, especially one that gives you a true glimpse into the hearts of the heroes behind the badge…” Sounds like a corny feature lede instead of a hard hitting news story. If advertisers really want to seamlessly integrate their ads into news copy, perhaps they should actually, read a newspaper first.

As far as ethics are concerned, with the economic crisis the newspaper industry is facing readers seem to be growing more and more indulgent of companies attempts at turning news into a commodity. Do you think this is right or wrong? Comment and let us know.

Job Title To Watch: Digital Correspondent

Being a blogger forces you to be a multi-tasker. If you’re good at what you do, you not only write, but edit, photograph and sometimes even act as videographer and editor, all to create an engaging blog post. So how can you parlay that into a career?

Today the American Journalism Review has a story on Mara Schiavocampo, NBC‘s first digital correspondent. In April of 2006, Schiavocampo left her job as a television news anchor at New York City’s WRNN. Sensing a disconnect between the way news is/was produced and the way new audiences were demanding to receive it, she boarded a plane to Jordan and set out to carve out a niche for herself as the first international digital correspondent.

Combing video, photographs and blogs to tell a more complete story, Schiavocampo used peoples’ desire for increased media transparency and audience interaction to create reports that went beyond sound bites from an interview.

Find out how Schiavocampo eventually secured an official job with NBC and what it takes to become an international digital correspondent after the jump.

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Old Media Finds Success With New Media

Adam-Carolla-Top-Gear-USA-2.jpg
Adam Carolla, you remember him from the 90s hit Loveline, right? How about The Man Show? Yeah, you know him (sort of)! In fact, that maybe his new media cache; everyone knows him, sort of.

Well CBS certainly had high hopes for him two years ago when they gave him his own radio show, The Adam Carolla Show, which was nationally syndicated to 11 markets. Their greatest hope was that he would replace NBC rival Howard Stern, who left his own national radio show in 2006 to join satellite radio station Sirius XM Radio.

Unfortunately the show did not quite work out for Adam and February 20th, his last show aired. Since then Carolla has started a new, self funded venture that&#151 while is does not currently command the same audience he once had on his radio show&#151boasts some of the most stellar ratings in the history of the medium. Carolla’s podcast&#151an hour long, rambling interview that MediaMemo calls “laugh out loud”&#151already has 400,000 subscribers. To put this into perspective, the only shows that rival his download numbers are from big media companies such as NPR, Time Warner’s HBO and Discovery Communications. Carolla’s on the other hand are all produced independently with the help of his assistant. The show costs an estimated $3,000 a month to produce&#151most of the cost is from bandwidth bills&#151but his actual revenue from the show is currently zero.

Why? It’s probably not what you think. Find out more after the jump

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