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Posts Tagged ‘Networking’

Top Journalism Conferences for Students & Educators to Attend in 2014

mikeIn case you’re looking to ramp up that Rolodex (sidebar: does anyone really use a traditional one anymore?), look no further.

Dan Reimold of College Media Matters compiled a list of “the most indispensable, regional, national and international conferences in 2014 for individuals practicing, teaching, advising and studying journalism.” Read more

New Research Reveals Old School Networking is Out

hello nametagYou know how most of the time we mention results from research studies that totally make sense?

This is not one of those times.

According to new research from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, people who use their network connections actually find jobs “at a slower rate than the average job seeker. The most effective way is to directly contact potential employers.”

Huh? Read more

Networking Is Key to Being a Successful Freelance Travel Writer

Travel WritingTravel writing as a genre stirs up plenty of emotion in people. Let’s be honest, it’s mostly jealousy. Getting paid to travel the world sounds like a pretty sweet deal, and it is… and isn’t. The reality of life as a freelance travel writer isn’t as glamorous as it’s made out to be. You’re constantly hustling to find work and it can be stressful at times.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, a freelance travel writer discusses the ups and downs of following her passion. One thing’s for sure: networking helped her land work:

Networking continues to be key, as with any profession. I’ve found that travel writers and bloggers are a strong community, and many of us introduce our colleagues to editors we work with if the fit is right. I’ve had the opportunity to write for a large daily newspaper, thanks in large part to a fellow writer I met on a press trip. And don’t forget to use social media for connections. I recently e-introduced myself to a new editor and her publication I’d read about on Twitter and made a few pitches I thought would be a fit — we’re now in conversation about assignments. It’s all about making the right pitch!

To hear more tips on how to cultivate your travel writing career, read: Embarking on My Greatest Adventure: Freelance Travel Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Four Tips to Survive & Actually Enjoy the Company Picnic

The Wall Street Journal outlines a few ways for employees to survive that annual company picnic. After all, it’s casual and has the potential to be a lot of fun but it’s most likely happening during a weekend.

As you relinquish your precious personal time to be with colleagues, you might as well make the most out of it. Here are four tips to not only survive the outing but enjoy it as well.

1. Your go get ‘em attitude! At a social event this like this you’re very visible so although you can still be yourself, your boss and your boss’ boss are watching. Your behavior will impact your reputation so if there’s a team sport like volleyball, why not participate? If you have an injury you can partake in the action by cheering on your team and/or taking photos. Read more

Four Ways to Fake It: Strategies to Pretend Remembering Someone’s Name

When we read this post by Gretchen Rubin, we nodded in agreement. How many
times have you been introduced to someone and by the end of the conversation, you have forgotten their name? Join the club.

As per the piece on AOL Jobs, there are a few strategies to keep in mind when you can’t seem to remember their name. As she pointed out, you can always politely state, “I’m sorry, I don’t recall your name.”

Or you can try to be a little more secretive as per Rubin’s strategies:

1. The “I know your name, but I’m blocked” dodge:
“I keep wanting to call you “David,” but I know that’s not right.”

2. The “Of course I know you–in fact, I want all your information” dodge:
“Hey, I’d love to get your card.”

3. The “The tip of my tongue” dodge:
“I know I know your name, but I’m blanking right now.”

4. The “You’re brilliant!” dodge:
“Wow, you have a terrific memory. I can’t believe you remember my name from that meeting six months ago. I can’t remember the names of people I met yesterday! So of course I have to ask you your name.”

7 Ways to Turn a Chance Encounter into a New Career

Meeting someone with the right connections to give you a shot at an interview can be both exciting and nerve-racking. For the latest Mediabistro feature, industry professionals explain how any job seeker can win over a prospective employer on the fly.

Tip No. 2: Start with the Relationship, Not the Resume

Remember, networking is about creating a connection, not making a hard sell. “Focus first on building the relationship with the executive. It’s important to make a connection before asking for anything,” said Kent Lee, career consultant for Yahoo! and CEO of Perfect Resume. “This can be done by simply asking questions that show a general interest and enthusiasm in the executive’s company.”

Read more in Networking 102: How to Turn a Chance Meeting Into a Career Opportunity

Nick Braun

Three Innovative Ways to Ramp Up Your Networking

When we read this post on Intuit, we couldn’t agree with it more.

Sure, networking at its core doesn’t really change over the time but your strategies sure can. Here are a few new ones to spice things up…

1. Create a layoff test. In the post, Alexandra Levit, workplace expert and author of New Job, New You writes, “If you got laid off from your job today, who are the 10 people you’d e-mail for advice on what to do next?  Reach out to them now, when you don’t need anything specifically.  Have lunch, coffee, or even a phone call.  You never know what gold nuggets might come out of an informal conversation without an urgent agenda.” Read more

How to Remember Someone’s Name in Four Simple Steps

We admit this happens to the best of us. You’re at a work luncheon, networking event or happy hour and while talking to someone and he or she tells you their name. And then it happens. You quickly forget it! Was it Tom? No, wait he said Tim. Um, maybe it was Tommy.

Well, a piece on Forbes today pointed out how we can jump-start our memories when it comes to remembering new names.

1. Focus on the person. For starters, we should focus on the person and block out all distractions. Darlene Price, author of Well Said! Presentations and Conversations That Get Results, told Forbes, “Square your shoulders toward them, look them in the eye, shake hands, smile with your eyes, and listen—listen intently.” She added, “Make it a top priority to learn their name and engage in a meaningful way. Don’t allow yourself to become distracted; and don’t let yourself off the hook by blaming a bad memory.”  Read more

Three Ways to Retool Your Networking Mojo

Okay, you know the drill. You’re at a cocktail party and strike up a conversation with someone standing next to you at the cheese and veggies table. You exchange cards, follow up via email to grab a cup of coffee and bam! It goes nowhere.

It may be time to rethink your networking prowess into a one-two punch. Here’s how to do it…

1. Be strategic and figure out who to stalk (um, we meant meet). Go into an event — whether it’s a panel with industry leaders or a cocktail party for the media, for instance — with a plan. Who do you want to meet? Looking to connect with fellow graphic designers? Or maybe you need to connect with editors? Book agents? Sometimes you may not even know who you want to meet and therein lies the quandary. Read more

Three Ways to Talk to Strangers & Improve Your Networking Skills

If you’re not exactly swift at working a room, no worries there. There’s a fine art to networking as a skill to be honed.

According to a new book by David Topus, there are several ways to make inroads in networking by connecting randomly with strangers.

His book, Talk to Strangers: How Everyday Random Encounters Can Expand Your Business, Career, Income, and Life, outlines an essential reminder. Anyone we encounter may be the owner of something we need or want whether it’s personally or professionally and vice versa, we may be able to offer something valuable to them as well. Read more

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