TVNewser Jobs PRNewser Jobs AgencySpy Jobs SocialTimes Jobs

Posts Tagged ‘NPR’

NPR Calls Social Media a ‘Great Equalizer’ Regarding Recruiting

If you ever wondered if some companies use Twitter to recruit, if this post is any indication, National Public Radio has found tremendous success with social media.

According to a piece published by The Washington Post, NPR decided to mention a new job posting on Twitter and Twitter alone.  Although the deadline to receive applications was merely one week away, the tweet resulted in 132 re-tweets and 140 applications. As a result, NPR hired 15 interns.

In fact, Lars Schmidt, the senior director of talent acquisition and innovation indicated social media is “a great equalizer” when companies compete for talent. Read more
Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting December 1, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! In this online boot camp, you’ll hear from freelancing experts on the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

HR Execs Tell How to Prepare for a Job Interview

Our Career Breakfast panelists had a lot more to offer than cookie-cutter advice about preparing for a job interview. If you missed our live broadcast, we’ve rounded up a few key tips and embedded the full video below.

Lars Schmidt, NPR’s talent acquisition leader, advised candidates to Google themselves to fully understand what the company may know about you. “You don’t want to be derailed by a question you’re not prepared for.”

Mediabistro VP of education and events Carmen Scheidel reminded viewers that the interview itself is a form of research, essentially a great opportunity to decide if the company culture is something that you can commit your career to.

Finally, HR pro Laurie Ruettimann advised job seekers to remain neutral — in both look and odor. That means no hot pink skirts or dumping on cologne. “You want to be memorable for your knowledge, skills and abilities, not for your wardrobe or how you smell.”

Some Employers are Discriminating Against the Unemployed

Ken Hawkins

It becomes a catch-22. You’re looking for a job because you’re out of work, but you’re not being hired because you’re out of work and have been for a long time.

NPR recently looked at a growing trend of employers who discriminate against the long-term unemployed, despite the fact that the recession has spurred a number of people who have been out of work for longer than usual. Some companies are mentioning in hiring ads that the unemployed need not apply.

One HR professional said that his employer doesn’t consider candidates who have been out of work for more than six months.

To help combat this, several states — California, Connecticut, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota and Tennessee — are considering legislation that would prevent companies from discrimination against the unemployed. Fines would most likely be assessed.

But this is easier said than done. This type of discrimination could be hard to prove, save for the blatant kind found in hiring ads.

And as we know, there are many factors that go into a hiring decision.  As NPR points out, some employers want to see that applicants performed some sort of work during stretches of unemployment, even volunteering.

What’s the unemployed to do in all of this? HR professionals encourage the unemployed to remain active.

Questionable Hiring Practices | Newsweek’s Financial Losses | NPR versus CNN

Oprah Vents While Stars And Stripes Admits Porn Problem, Plus Other News of the Day

- Oprah Winfrey wasn’t pleased; wasn’t pleased at all to leave broadcast television. According to a report from Fortune magazine, Oprah talks about what took place when she negotiated a partnership with Discovery Communications to help build her own network OWN. Discovery CEO David Zaslav demanded more of Oprah’s time and on-air presence at OWN, if he was going to commit. She said she “wasn’t pleased,” according to Fortune. “I wasn’t pleased at all.” Well, it seems like she’s gotten over it.

- Stars and Stripes employees aren’t just reporting the war, according to an internal investigation. They’re also partaking in other activities provided on the Internet. “A Stars and Stripes internal investigation found that ‘a considerable number’ of the news organization’s Pacific employees have accessed gambling and pornography sites using government computers, officials confirmed this week,” writes Stars and Stripes Erik Slavin.  When will people learn that their computers are being watched at work? This seems to happen all the time now.

- Business journalists now have a stylebook. Really, it’s not the first. Most organizations have basic writing guide, but UNC-Chapel Hill journalism professor Chris Roush decided to write a book for business journalists to reference, if needed. What’s Roush’s biggest issue with business journalism? “My biggest pet peeve when reading a business story is seeing a business term or phrase used incorrectly by the reporter and not corrected by the editor,” said Roush to Talking Biz News. “It’s apparent that someone who was interviewed for the story said the term or phrase in the interview, and the reporter thought it sounded important, so they decided to use it. But they don’t know what the term really means. I see this a lot with net income vs. operating income.” I hate that too.

- NPR has hired on two more investigative journalists, reports our sister blog FishbowlDC. Margot Williams comes from the New York Times and the Washington Post, where she uncovered jihadists online and worked on two “Washington Post Pulitzer Prize-winning teams,” according to NPR’s internal memo written by investigative head Susanne Reber. The other, Alicia Cypress, also comes from the Post offices, where she worked for the past 16 years. While there, she created the Post Tech podcast and the “Green” page, which focused on the environment.

Photo by christine zenino

Old Media Finds Success With New Media

Adam-Carolla-Top-Gear-USA-2.jpg
Adam Carolla, you remember him from the 90s hit Loveline, right? How about The Man Show? Yeah, you know him (sort of)! In fact, that maybe his new media cache; everyone knows him, sort of.

Well CBS certainly had high hopes for him two years ago when they gave him his own radio show, The Adam Carolla Show, which was nationally syndicated to 11 markets. Their greatest hope was that he would replace NBC rival Howard Stern, who left his own national radio show in 2006 to join satellite radio station Sirius XM Radio.

Unfortunately the show did not quite work out for Adam and February 20th, his last show aired. Since then Carolla has started a new, self funded venture that&#151 while is does not currently command the same audience he once had on his radio show&#151boasts some of the most stellar ratings in the history of the medium. Carolla’s podcast&#151an hour long, rambling interview that MediaMemo calls “laugh out loud”&#151already has 400,000 subscribers. To put this into perspective, the only shows that rival his download numbers are from big media companies such as NPR, Time Warner’s HBO and Discovery Communications. Carolla’s on the other hand are all produced independently with the help of his assistant. The show costs an estimated $3,000 a month to produce&#151most of the cost is from bandwidth bills&#151but his actual revenue from the show is currently zero.

Why? It’s probably not what you think. Find out more after the jump

Read more