AgencySpy LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy FishbowlNY FishbowlDC GalleyCat SocialTimes

Andrew Russo

Sarah Evans, Owner and Partner at J Public Relations, Shares Her Secrets to PR Success

Are people simply born to be publicists? In Mediabistro’s interview with Sarah Evans, owner and partner at J Public Relations, the PR pro revealed as much:

Many of the qualities that I think make a successful PR person are innate; they can’t be learned. It’s drive; it’s charisma; it’s intuition. It’s intuitively understanding what a client wants and what a client needs, and then intuitively understanding the media and their reaction to that.

Evans launched the firm’s New York division in 2009 — at the age of 29 — with JPR founder Jamie Lynn Sigler. Since then, the company has acquired more than 70 clients on five continents, has seen a 50 percent year-over-year revenue increase in each of the five years of Evans’ tenure, and received a top-100 ranking by Odwyer’s.

Part of Evans’ formula for success includes combining that innate talent and building relationships with people, often with the help of social media. Evans believes that “engaging with [people] personally really holds that professional connection.” Evans also stresses a well-maintained work-life balance in order to better the company as, she says, “a happy boss means happy employees.”

For more tips from Sarah Evans, read: So What Do You Do, Sarah Evans, Owner and Partner at J Public Relations?

Mental Floss Wants Quirky, Off-Beat Product Pitches and the Stories Behind Them

Mental Floss is the academic junk drawer of odds and ends of information, origin stories and occasionally the “random things Billy Murray does,” as digital managing editor Erin McCarthy put it. So it makes sense that editors want publicists to come to them with quirky and off-beat products.

Editor-in-chief Jessanne Collins and her staff work regularly with publicists in the fields of travel, books, and spirits and liquor. But, it is not as simple as just pitching an eccentric product. Said Collins:

“There has to be some sort of smart, weird or quirky hook to any hotel or restaurant pitch, and similar with spirits; it’s not just about making a drink, it’s about learning about the history of the spirit and some of the interesting facts and context.”

Collins and her team stressed the importance of understanding the voice of the magazine and its aesthetic. ”It’s really about just being familiar with what we do and the types of things we cover, as well as the angles we cover things from,” said Collins.

For more pitching tips and editors’ contact information, read: How To Pitch: Mental Floss.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

 

Social Media: One Place to Find Technical, Sales Writing Gigs

Technical and sales writing does not carry with it the romantic image of sitting in a cafe in Paris, the excitement of chasing down a lead or the somber atmosphere of writing poetry on a rainy day. But it does allow for a starting point in writing for companies and brands, not to mention a means of a steady income.

Amanda Layman Low did not picture herself working in technical writing for a sales consulting company, but now that she’s there she recommends it as a career option for all writers. For those who may not have considered the option of writing copy for brochures, manuals, PowerPoint slides, etc., Layman Low says you should “dip your toes in” as there will always be a need for technical writers. She writes:

Google technical writing jobs or sales writing jobs. The company I work for is a sales consulting company, but most corporations have their own in-house writers and contractors who provide content for training, presentations and other corporate materials.

If you’re interested in pursuing technical writing, one place to start is social media. Layman Low applied for her current position by seeing the status update of a friend of a friend and recommends mining social media for job opportunities.

For more on technical writing and what it means for you as a writer, read: The Case for Breaking Into Technical Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

 

Publicists: Latina Wants Your Celebrity Stories

Few things get a magazine more excited than a possible celebrity exclusive, and Latina is no different. The 18-year-old publication is well known for featuring prominent Latina women as sources and experts on a variety of topics, including parenting, relationships, money and more. If you have a story on a Latina celebrity, editors want you to step forward.

While cultural competence is key when pitching to the magazine for the “acculturated Latina,” so is timeliness and content relevancy.

Dan Koday, executive content director for both the magazine and its online counterpart, Latina.com asserts:

Reference something we’ve recently done. We won’t cover someone just because he or she is Latino or Latina. It has to be a compelling story. If you have a specific section to pitch it for, even better.

Writers and publicists should pitch profiles and products at least four months in advance. Also take note: Latina “does stories, not announcements,” says Koday.

For more pitching advice and editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Latina.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Showcase Your Creative Clients at This Artistic Pub

CommunicationArtsCommunication Arts has a long history of inspiring others in the communication industry. The trade journal strives to motivate industry pros to create meaningful work, covering visual work from ad agencies to photographers.

For PR pros, CA is a goldmine. It’s an established mag with a diverse demographic of readers, who all have a shared love of art. There are a variety of topics that are particularly PR friendly:

Publicists should tailor a pitch around one of four sections: “Exhibit,” a showcase of new and innovative projects in graphic design and advertising from around the world; “Fresh,” which features the latest cutting-edge work from people, firms and agencies that have been working professionally for approximately five years; “Webpicks,” a daily dose of outstanding Website design; and “News.”

To hear more about CA, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Communication Arts.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Highlight Your Clients In This Historic Mag

SaturdayEveningPostThe revered Saturday Evening Post has been around for nearly 300 years, and is still going strong. This general interest pub features a variety of topics, including travel, art, fitness, health and more.

The subjects covered and the pub’s key demographic (40-plus and well educated) are perfect for you PR pros hoping to score your client a spot in a coveted mag. Just be sure you’ve done your research prior to your pitch:

Located in the Post‘s front-of-book, the “Post Its” section is a gathering of various short, newsy pieces that are prime for PR pitches. Specifically, editors are looking for American-made products for the “Made in the USA” column (“We’re interested in products that are beautiful… and also represent something that we are proud is made in the United States,” said editor-in-chief Steve Slon) and fitness trainers for the regular “5 Minute Fitness” tip.

To hear more details on how to get your clients in the mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: The Saturday Evening Post.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.