TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Big Questions

Is the ‘Client/Partner’ Label Spin or a Serious Definition?

recipe for success

If you work with new business pitches for any amount of time, you will see one of the hidden mysteries of PR pitching unfold in a matter of minutes: how an agency transforms from a vendor to a “trusted partner.”

This is the magical moment when PR agencies are no longer looked at as “hired guns,” but rather “extensions of the marketing team to help reach a common goal.” This is when value of opinion becomes a thing. This is when execution of big ideas become a thing. And this is when your retainer is no longer “a thing.”

Shouldn’t the same happen for clients from the agency perspective? And if so (and it really should, in case you’re wondering), when is that moment?

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Get hands-on content marketing training in our brand new boot camp, Content Marketing 101! Starting September 8, digital marketing and content experts will teach you the tips and tricks for creating, distributing and measuring the success of your brand's content. Sign up before August 15 and get $50 OFF registration. Register now! 

Which Firms Pay the Big(gest) Bucks?

CASH MONEY BITCHES

This week the always-excellent Holmes Report published its annual World Report tracking the globe’s top PR firms by income and other metrics. It’s a very useful rankings source that you’ve probably already seen.

Interestingly, some firms provide both income totals and staffing numbers while others choose to be more…discrete.

As an amusing (and definitely not even close to 100% accurate) thought experiment, we scrolled through the list and did a little quick division to see which firms have the most reported income per reported employee.

As imprecise as this math may be, we still find the ratios fascinating.

Read more

PR for the Recently Departed?

tombstone

Here’s an amusing piece that our friends at PR Doctor Chicago shared this morning involving public relations for the recently deceased.

In short: “best-selling Southern author and syndicated columnist Ronda Rich“, who also spent a good part of her career in PR/marketing, theorizes that the family of a certain wealthy but disagreeable someone “hired a P.R. firm to write his obituary like a star-gone-bad hires a firm to remake her image.”

Not so sure about that…

Read more

PR vs. Advertising: Still the Same Competition?

shutterstock_166919984Forbes just published a piece discussing, in some detail, “the real difference between PR and advertising.”

This realness in difference begins with an old saying: “Advertising is what you pay for, publicity is what you pray for.” Or, boiled down even further, advertising is paid media, public relations is earned media.

A simple maxim from a simpler time. But does it hold up today?

Author Robert Wynne believes that it does. Not only is PR still different from advertising — it’s still better.

“With advertising, you tell people how great you are. With publicity, others sing your praises. Which do you think is more effective?” asks Wynne.

The unspoken answer is supported by a 2014 Nielsen study on the role of content in the consumer decision-making process, which concluded that PR is almost 90% more effective than advertising: “On average, expert content lifted familiarity 88 percent more than branded content…”

Expert sources also agree.

Read more

Why Does PR Have Such a Big Turnover Problem?

shutterstock_182802224

Today in Absolutely Not Breaking News: Last month Entrepreneur posted a good piece about how the PR/ad agency model is “ripe for disruption” as creative folks and resourceful managers figure out how to best serve clients outside the traditional framework. Two lines in particular stood out to us:

“Nobscot Corp. estimates voluntary and involuntary turnover reached more than 55 percent over the past 12 months.”

That is a large number. Also…

Read more

5 Things Wrong with the Press Release

PR ER

Once upon a time, there was a tool called the press release.

It was the largest hammer, longest nail, and strongest muscle all in one. Flacks were able to write commercial-esque documents in hopes of national pick-up. Clients were happy because of their approved (and finely crafted) 18-paragraph quotes. PR agencies were happy because they had a sure-fire journalism story written with fluidity.

Today? No one seems happy.

Releases don’t get that universal attention. Clients don’t get infomercial-length quotes. The Web certainly can’t stand such content, what with Google’s pet Panda traipsing all over free news wires like a scene from Godzilla. So, what happened? After the jump, we take a look…

Read more

Culture: How Smaller Agencies Keep Up With the Joneses

Employees-Happiness-Paramount-to-Success

Can your agency say this?  Few even try, so it seems.

It is no secret that the industry of public relations is run by the “biggies” (e.g., Burson-Marsteller, Edelman, Ketchum, Weber Shandwick, FleishmanHillard, GolinHarris). Because of their global reach and U.S. presence, many prospective clients see them as the benchmark of service, ability, and results. As a former “Burson person” and a “Big PR” alum, I can attest to the fact that they all earn it.

It was at a biggie where I cut my teeth, spread my wings, and cracked my shell into smithereens. That said, to compete with said biggies in their trek for global PR domination, the “boutiques” have looked into other areas to draw the attention of top prospects: availability, flexibility, tangibility. It was at the “not-so-biggies” where I learned everything else.

So, what’s the rub? The silver bullet these smaller, scalable agencies are using to compete is culture. 

Is that all it takes?

Read more

7 Experts Weigh in on the PR/Wikipedia Agreement

wikipedia2

This week brought news of what could be an historic agreement between top PR firms and the editorial community behind one of the world’s most-used, most contentious sources of information: Wikipedia.

The announcement, which primarily concerned ethical issues regarding firms’ relationships with the editors responsible for their clients’ pages, could have very real implications on the entire industry. Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales himself wrote, “A great opportunity is upon us.

We spoke to several experts, three of whom were directly involved in the project, to get their perspectives.

First a bit of history via Phil Gomes, SVP of Edelman Digital, who got the ball rolling.

Read more

Is Twitter Planning More Changes to Make America Freak Out?

twitter changes

Why does anything have to change?

It is going to happen, and usually when you least expect it — change. Things begin to sag. Batteries run out. You have to move. The job doesn’t have the “new car” smell anymore. Whatever it takes, things will change.

It’s the circle of life, and in technology, that circle is typically your PC buffering. Most changes are accepted, some more than others. However, when Twitter thought they could sneak one past America, social media imploded and warned whoever would listen that there better not be any more slick changes.

Yeah, there’s more…

Read more

5 Reasons Why the PR Industry Needs to Do Some Damage Control

same thinking PR

Yeah, that’s about it.

For years, your friends at PRNewser have dared to think and write things that some in our industry aren’t too crazy about us posting. Why? We are spilling the secret sauce all over the kitchen floor … and then dance in it to show our panache.

Listicles such as: PR myths that need debunking, traits of bad PR people, the worst PR stereotypes, PR buzzwords that suck, things PR people do to piss off the media, and the highly controversial things the media does that piss off PR people are itemized retrospectives on what ails the industry we all adore.

Yet, public relations is in dire need of PR itself. And here, right on schedule, are five reasons why…

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>