AgencySpy LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy FishbowlNY FishbowlDC GalleyCat SocialTimes

CSR

Millennial Investors More Focused on CSR as a Value Indicator

shutterstock_132478784

Ever had trouble convincing your clients of the value of CSR efforts? We’re guessing the answer to that question is “yes” because, in most cases, businesses judge the importance of public sentiment on the degree to which it influences investor relations.

We found a recent piece in The Guardian encouraging in that regard, however: as the average age of the investor class goes down, its interest in CSR and “profit with purpose” goes up.

Read more

Apple: ‘No, We Don’t Get Our Supplies from Murderous Congolese Warlords’

Screen Shot 2014-02-13 at 12.03.48 PM

Apple made a big move on the CSR front this morning (not that any of its acolytes care): the company released its annual “Supplier Responsibility Report” clarifying that none of the the materials used in the metals that form its products come from “areas engaged in warfare.”

This statement means that Apple does not do direct or indirect business with the warlords who run the “conflict minerals” trade in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Ever seen Blood Diamonds? Same story, different country.

Of course this is Apple, so the report doubles as a beautiful piece of not-quite-interactive content explaining the many facets of its CSR efforts. There’s a screenshot after the jump…

Read more

CVS Quits Smoking, Gets Defensive About It

16601_10152165436598116_438158652_nThis morning’s biggest CSR news comes via the country’s largest pharmacy chain. As announced in this press release, CVS Caremark will stop selling all tobacco products at its more than 6,000 U.S. locations on October 1st, 2014.

The change comes in the wake of a January surgeon general’s report, which arrived exactly 50 years after the first and tied smoking even more directly to diseases like diabetes, colon cancer and erectile dysfunction (eek). The company spun it as a way of aligning its services and interests, which include public health—nice copy on the tagline, BTW. Here’s the key quote from CEO Larry J. Merlo:

 ”Ending the sale of cigarettes and tobacco products at CVS/pharmacy is the right thing for us to do for our customers and our company to help people on their path to better health. Put simply, the sale of tobacco products is inconsistent with our purpose.”

This is a very smart move for several reasons.

Read more

Western Clothing Brands Escape Blame in Deadly Factory Collapse

image

(Pic via Associated Press/A.M. Ahad)

It was one of 2013′s most tragic stories—and it should have been one of the year’s biggest PR disasters as well.

Unfortunately, as we enter 2014 it looks like the Western clothing companies involved in April’s Bangladeshi factory collapse have washed their hands of it in every possible way.

Read more

PR Win: Publishers Run with Charitable #HolidayHaiku Campaign

So Penguin and Random House ran a creative charity campaign on Twitter today in a partnership with NY hunger non-profit City Harvest.

Word nerds that we are, we enjoyed scrolling through the entries. Tough to pick a winner, but we do love these three:

There’s our mother of dragons. Good job, everyone.

How Do Millennials Feel About Charity?

shutterstock_120460033

On Giving Tuesday, we thought it would be appropriate to explore the relationship between charities and that most important demographic: Millennials (yes, we dislike the word too, but it seems we’re stuck with it).

Truth be told, we were initially inspired to write this post because of an irritating quote that “The Millennial Whisperer”, aka psych professor Dr. Jean Twinge, offered Digiday last week:

“One common [claim] is that this generation really wants to help people and they want jobs where that’s the No. 1 goal and that they’re very interested in getting along in government. And that’s not true. They’re even less interested in that than previous generations.”

So Gen Y talks a good game on generosity but doesn’t follow up, huh? Other researchers beg to differ.

Read more

Google Gets Into the #GivingTuesday Spirit

Screen Shot 2013-12-03 at 10.35.32 AM

Google knows charity. Today the search masters have taken an extra step to promote the Giving Tuesday event, hosting a 12 hour “Hangout-a-thon” in order to connect those interested in giving to the best non-profit and charity organizations.

Moderated by Mashable, the event has 24 non-profit partners including such big names as Save the Children and UNICEF as well as newcomers like Charity Waterthe Malala Fund and Girls Who Code. Its stated purpose is to “spread awareness about under served charities“, and we’re also very interested in hearing from the TOMS and Warby Parker founders on the notion of “gifts that give back.”

Read more

PR Takes a Lead Role in #GivingTuesday

179726_484215531657158_5599765_n

Giving Tuesday, an event started last year to counter the “buy buy buy” message of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, was a resounding success that looks to be even bigger this year. The initial goal was to get 250 nonprofit organizations to participate in 2012, but the total quickly grew to ten times that number, and more than 5,000 have signed up for the 2013 event.

While the United Nations Trust and the 92nd Street YMCA claim credit for the idea’s origins, the PR industry has played a large role in making it work—especially this year.

As The Holmes Report noted last week, agencies including Weber Shandwick, Fleishman Hillard, Havas and more collaborated on both outreach and the development of related “digital toolkits” to ensure that this year’s event is expertly organized. The process benefits agencies, clients and the public at large, with some organizations reporting a 50% rise in donations.

The National Philanthropic Trust held several events in the Philadelphia area in order to help organizations make the most out of Giving Tuesday, and in this Harvard Business Review piece president and CEO Eileen Heisman encourages charities to develop their own creative innovations on the theme.

We planned to find some of our favorite Giving Tuesday efforts, but we were a little overwhelmed by the search results. Which campaigns stuck out to you, dear readers?

(Image via the Giving Tuesday Facebook page)

PR Win: Coca-Cola Suspends Ad Budget in the Philippines to Support Typhoon Recovery

75

Here’s that rare example of a massive and at times ethically challenged corporation doing something good not because it has to but because it can.

Last week Coca-Cola announced plans to suspend its advertising budget in the Philippines starting on November 18th and redirect that money to local recovery efforts after typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) left much of the country in desperate need of humanitarian aid. While the company began distributing water immediately after the storm via The Coca-Cola Foundation Philippines, it initially planned to donate only “US$2.5 million in cash and in-kind contributions.”

That promise expanded three days later, however:

“Any committed advertising space will be redirected to the relief and rebuilding efforts for the people in Visayas.”

We’re as cynical as the next blogger, which is to say “extremely”, and we didn’t see any real numbers in the update. But the point is that Coke didn’t have to go this far in its charity efforts—and that’s the key to success on the CSR front.

(H/T to SunnySkyz for this one)

Target Fails to Convince Canadians Not to Shop at Walmart

Target CanadaSo Target opened in Canada this year. Were you not aware? Neither were most Canadians. As Brand Channel put it back in 2012, Target crossed the border “politely, and bearing gifts.

The brand hit all the right opening notes, checking the charity and environmental responsibility boxes by allowing Facebook fans to donate (via the company) to their charities of choice and announcing plans to aim for LEED certification at all 124 Canadian locations. They were one of the first organizations in the country to do that, and it earned them a commendation from the Green Building Council. They even paired with a local fashion “incubator” to create a contest offering one lucky up-and-coming designer a chance to sell his or her 2014 line in Target.

So it was a three-pronged attack, and they did everything right. One problem, though: Walmart remains cheaper than Target when it comes to the basics, and that’s kind of a big deal.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGE