TVNewser Show TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Damage Control

GM Releases More CEO Pay Details to Counter Gender Discrimination Charge

mary-barra_620x434

Today in This Had to Happen news, General Motors has responded to a flurry of stories reporting that its new CEO Mary Barra (the first woman to hold that position) would earn “48%” as much as the company’s previous chief by releasing more details of her compensation package two months early.

Read more

PR and High Culture: MoMA Addresses Backlash Over Folk Art Museum Demolition

52d849c1e8e44e4f21000032_the-indicator-the-floor-plates-just-didn-t-line-up_american_folk_art_museum-530x353

Public museums need public relations, too. In a story that exposes a side of the discipline we rarely see, New York’s Museum of Modern Art has attempted to garner public support for a move that threatens to split the worlds of art and architecture and lead many wealthy donors to close their wallets.

Here’s a quick summary (trust us, it gets interesting):

Read more

The New York Times Will Expose Your Fake Apologies with #ApologyWatch

shutterstock_120719548

A New York Times reporter and a corporate reputation specialist walked into a bar this week and came to the same conclusion: they’ve had enough of your clients’ fake apologies.

Both business writer Andrew Ross Sorkin and LRN CEO Dov Seidman argue that execs and public figures who once opposed apologizing in public have started doing it all the damn time, and they want to make it stop.

Whether we’re talking indicted bankers, embattled politicians or cheating athletes, lots of people are stepping up to the mic to tell the public that they’re sorry for whatever they did and that it will never happen again. But Sorkin and Seidman look at those weepy, white-haired millionaires and see nothing but media coaching and crocodile tears.

So now they plan to expose the fakers—and they even came up with their own hashtag to do it.

Read more

Woody Allen’s Publicist Strongly Denies Abuse Allegations

shutterstock_169028984

Allen’s wax double wins the creepy contest

Only one thing is certain: Woody Allen has had a rough few weeks.

As we begin to recover from our shock over the tragic death of Philip Seymour Hoffman, we can expect to hear a lot more about the other story that rocked the entertainment world last week: the newly resurfaced allegations that Allen abused partner Mia Farrow‘s adopted daughter more than 20 years ago—when she was only 7 years old.

Dylan Farrow’s open letter, published by The New York TimesNicholas Kristof, went into graphic detail about the allegations, which first surfaced during Allen’s very public separation from Farrow. As Kristof himself reported, the public’s response was mixed:

One woman is definitely not thanking him: Woody Allen’s publicist Leslee Dart.

Read more

STUDY: 21% of Users Write Reviews for Products/Services They Have Never Tried

negative-reviewSometimes, products, services and companies fully deserve the harsh reviews they may get online–bad service, shoddy products and questionable business practices are all valid reasons to call out the culprits and warn others away from a potentially negative experience. Not only can such reviews act as a public service, but some are hugely entertaining (you’ve seen Amazon’s review page for these Haribo gummy bears, right?).

But what if the online reviews upon which customers are basing purchasing decisions are totally fabricated?

According to recent YouGov research, a surprising 21% (one fifth!) of Americans who have reviewed a product or service online say they have done so without ever buying, using or trying that product or service. Who would do this, you ask? Surely this is the behavior of young, bored, immature kids, right? Wrong. We’re talking adults, here. And not just any adults–parents. Read more

Facebook Responds to Princeton Naysayers: ‘I Know You’re Doomed, But What Am I?’

facebook-middle-fingerICYMI, earlier this week the nerds at Princeton University produced a study comparing social networks to viruses and predicting that Facebook would become a virtual ghost town by 2017 via dubious growth model data. It got a lot of attention for turning all those “Facebook is doomed” stories into “real science.”

Of course the Facebook team noticed it too—and yesterday data scientist Mike Develin responded with a “study” of his own that provides us with a pretty cool example of less-than-traditional damage control.

Develin and his fellow scientists created their own series of charts graphing, for example, the number of studies released by Princeton compared to its Google search rankings. Using the “correlation = causation” principle, they predicted (in jest) that the school’s student body would decline by 50% by 2018—and that it wouldn’t have any students at all by 2021.

Read more

Disney Withdraws from Pro-Fracking Elementary School Tour

n-ROCKING-IN-OHIO-large570Upon hearing that Disney was bringing an educational program to Ohio elementary schools, a few possibilities of what the program might look like came to mind: Princesses preaching the power of love? Talking animals touting the importance of friendship? Nope; this was three representatives from Radio Disney explaining the importance and benefits of the controversial practice of hydraulic fracturing (fracking).

Last month, a program called Rocking in Ohio, which was led by three Radio Disney staffers and entirely funded by the Ohio Oil and Gas Energy Education Program (a lobbying group paid for by oil and gas companies), performed a series of events at 26 elementary schools across the state, educating students about the process and benefits of fracking.

Read more

‘Personal PR Consultant’ to Roger Ailes Buys Ads Promoting Official Biography

cn_image.size.roger-ailes-bookAnd that’s the most interesting detail we took from the recent glut of reporting on Roger Ailes‘s reaction to Gabriel Sherman‘s “unauthorized” bio The Loudest Voice in the Room, which will finally hit shelves tomorrow.

Here’s another one: as part of what NYT‘s David Carr calls “Ailes’s permanent pushback campaign“, the Fox exec chose his own biographer, Zev Chafets (who also wrote about Rush Limbaugh) to pen a competing book called Roger Ailes: Off Camera. He then promoted that tome via Fox when it came out in March and placed an exclusive excerpt in Vanity Fair, of all places.

That’s not all, though.

Read more

So, That Target Breach Actually Affected 70 Million Customers

shutterstock_157365584

The story that won our unofficial “biggest corporate PR Fail of 2013” contest just got worse.

This morning we learned that the number of customers affected by Target‘s credit card security breach just went all astronomical on us, reaching a total nearly double that listed in initial reports. Here’s the worst line from that sob story:

“Target said the personal data stolen could affect its past shoppers — not just those who have visited the store recently.”

The company added that the information taken could include names, addresses, phone numbers and emails (in addition to those ATM PIN numbers).

Talk about a Friday Dump. We offer our closest approximation of the appropriate response after the jump.

Read more

Survey Shows SeaWorld’s Reputation Damaged but Intact

It's gonna be OK. Not really though.

“It’s gonna be OK, boy (not really though).”

We’ve written a good bit about SeaWorld’s reputation struggles recently; we even included the company on our list of 2013′s “biggest losers“, because have you seen Blackfish? Damn.

You can’t always trust social media, though: a recent survey by YouGov‘s Brand Index shows us that the damage might not be quite as bad as we thought. In fact, it’s been “comparatively far milder than other recent major crises in the news.”

Surprised?

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>