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Pitches

Pitch Your Beauty Clients to YouBeauty.com

YouBeautyYouBeauty.com, the science-based beauty site co-founded by Dr. Mehmet Oz, is open to PR pitches.

For publicists, the pitching opportunities are endless: Makeup, hair and skin products are always in demand. As the editors explain, publicists need to show that they understand the site’s mission and content:

YouBeauty features daily editorial content that reviews the most recently published studies and trending health topics that have the web buzzing. There’s also a group of quizzes based on real, scientific scales that are licensed from universities and research institutions. When readers take a quiz (that determines stress level, for example), they are given feedback on their results and are then routed to corresponding articles. It’s a strategic approach to delivering personalized, science-backed and beauty-based content that differentiates YouBeauty from other health and wellness publications.

To hear more about the site, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: YouBeauty.com.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

INTERVIEW: Dave Lieber of The Dallas Morning News re: The Haggler, #PRFail, Pitching Properly

batman robin spamYesterday, we brought you a story penned by David Segal (aka “The Haggler”) of New York Times consumer reporting fame. In summary, he was sent an atrocious email by an Austin, Texas PR firm. This pitch was so bad, Segal called Vocus for putting his number on a list and the PR firm for actually using it for such imbecilic reasons. Neither Vocus nor the PR firm ever called him back, and now Segal hates flacks from here to eternity.

In response, I called a friend of mine: Segal’s counterpart at The Dallas Morning News, the great Dave Lieber.

For more than 20 years, Dave was the consumer crusader of the southwest from the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. That is until he was called upon to play for the other team at the Morning News. If anyone will help flacks understand the suckdom of others in this profession, it’s Dave Lieber. He really cares, not only about journalism, but also about people in general. And yes, that includes PR professionals. Here’s my interview with Dave “The Watchdog” Lieber.

Read to the end and enjoy. Trust me, I know you will:

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7 Holiday Pitching Tips for PR Pros

HolidayPRPitchThe holidays are the perfect time of year for PR pros to showcase a new product to the world. Members of the media are compiling their holiday wish lists, Black Friday is around the corner and consumers are hungry to hear about the hottest new trends.

So how can you be sure your product is seen (and most importantly, bought)? One of the first steps publicists need to take is a journalistic one: Do some research.

Most marketing companies sell media databases that have a list of beats, pitching tips and full contact information. In addition, there are free resources, including using LinkedIn and Twitter to find journalist information. (You’ll also find editor email addresses within Mediabistro’s own Mastheads database and How To Pitch articles.) Some of the most successful publicists have long-standing relationships with media outlets and social influencers because they took the time to research which department or journalist is responsible for that section.

To hear more tips on how to pitch during the holidays, including how to use social media to your advantage, read: 7 Holiday Pitching Tips For PR Pros.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Someone Pitched a ‘Woman-Proof Car’ and It Was Bad

What, you thought all British people were naturally hilarious? Here’s the offending (fictional) automobile, complete with “a swivel seat” and “extra-large bumpers.”

Breakeryard concept image - woman proof car side view.jpg

Because women can’t park or back up or avoid bumping into things. Got it. Oh, and the color is pink in order to “alert other road users; specifically males.”

It’s a sad sexist joke disguised as a pitch, but someone designed the graphic and wrote/distributed the release and answered the inevitable “what the hell is this nonsense?” responses.

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Feature Your Clients In This PR-Friendly Parenting Pub

AmericanBabyAmerican Baby‘s target demographic are millennial moms and the mag’s goal is to try and assess her wants and needs. It’s the perfect place to showcase your clients, whether they be products, people or places.

Jessica HartshornAmerican Baby’s lifestyle director, says the pub is always open to pitches from PR professionals. Everything from celebrities to nursery furniture is fair game. Here are some topics ripe for pitching:

Specific PR-friendly sections of the magazine include ”Baby Booty” (products), “Nesting” (nursery) and “Baby Best” (a roundup of best-in-show of one type of item, such as car seats). Sending a great picture of the product with a pitch is pretty standard, but if you’re super-eager, feel free to cold-mail a sample of your product to American Baby’s offices. Hartshorn notes that seeing an item face to face for the first time can be advantageous over an email, but be advised that editors are unable to return samples.

To learn more about PR pitching, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: American Baby.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

 

Detroit’s Top PR Man Tells Reporters ‘No More Voicemails Ever, Thanks’

shutterstock_14100871We should all know that journalists really don’t like cold calls. We do know that, right?

OK. The truism apparently applies to PR people, too.

Today Jim Romensko reports on an unusual step taken by Bill Nowling, spokesperson for the city of Detroit’s emergency manager Kevyn Orr. When the city declared bankruptcy this summer, every journalist wanted to write about it—and at some point Nowling decided enough was enough.

He sent an email to reporters outlining a “new contact procedure”:

Going forward, all media requests (for information, for interviews, for directions) will be handled via e-mail…

…be as detailed as possible as to the issue about which you are calling or the specific questions you have.

VM just adds delay in responding, especially when most messages simply say “call me back.”

This is understandable for a guy who has “25 or more” voicemails waiting to be heard at any given time. Judging by the comments on the post, other PRs agree:

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Showcase Your Clients In This Latina-Driven Mag

CosmopolitanLatinasCosmopolitan for Latinas, an off-shoot of Cosmopolitan magazine, bills itself as ‘the spirit of Cosmo with a Latina sensibility and the Latina voice.’ This quarterly pub has plenty of room for publicist pitches. The sections that are open to hearing from PR pros include: “En Vivo”, which is all about entertainment; “Divertida”, which focuses on anything lifestyle related and “Beauty.” Some additional pitching etiquette:

 The best way for PR pros to pitch is through email with links (if no links are available, sending samples is a good idea), and editors will follow up with an email or phone call if they think something is a good fit. If you don’t hear back in two weeks, it’s OK to follow up with a phone call. The mag is published quarterly, and if you want to give your pitch the best chance, managing editor Jessica Rodriguez advised pitching right after an issue closing — not during.

For editors’ contact info and more, read: How To Pitch: Cosmopolitan for Latinas.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

The Diverse Dimensions of Pitching Shelter and Design Stories

Lonny Magazine Door Numbers PRN PostAspirational or accessible, fabulous celebrity properties or home makeover solutions, brand new items or older but undiscovered products? These are a few of the many choices in the disparate home, garden and design media category. Types of outlets have also expanded, from coveted ‘shelter’ magazines to sought-after blogs to TV shows and out-of-home taxi video segments.

Pitching opportunities for stories and product placements have similarly increased. PCNY’s panel on Monday featured editors and producers from six home and design media outlets, all providing clues about optimal approaches. They also offered tips about what to send, such as photos or videos. One brand even has a ‘submit story’ button on their site.

The following national and local media outlets and panelists were represented:
NBC/LXTV Open House, Tracy Evers, supervising producer
Hearst Design Group’s 3 brands: Elle Décor, House Beautiful and Veranda, Orli Ben-Dor, Market Editor
Lonny, digital magazine, John Newlin, editor-in-chief, Livingly Media
Apartment Therapy blog, Maxwell Ryan, founder and CEO
Inhabitat website, Jill Fehrenbacher, founder and editor
The New York Observer newspaper, Kim Velsey, senior editor, real estate, development, urban planning

(First image is courtesy of Lonny.com, and second image is courtesy of Veranda.com)

Below is a brief rundown by outlet:

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Showcase Your Clients in This Southern Lifestyle Pub

GardenandGun

Garden & Gun, the bi-monthly pub that strives to capture the “Soul of the South” is the perfect place to promote your client, whoever they may be.

The magazine has features on everything from gallery openings and restaurant reviews to new music and travel destinations. But be warned: G&G won’t accept pitches on your everyday restaurant opening; there must be a special angle to the piece. For example, if the chef takes a classic Southern dish and puts his own unique twist on it. Likewise, avoid pitching a hotel/resort/spa simply because it’s been around for years. The mag’s deputy editor Dave Mezz, has more advice for publicists:

Garden & Gun accepts publicist pitches for a whole range of clients. PR pros can pitch new openings, artists, gallery owners, products, restaurants and chefs. There’s also a “G&G Interview” in every issue, which features a prominent Southern personality. Mezz’s advice to publicists is similar to his advice for writers: “We’re looking for what’s fresh, what hasn’t been written about, what’s surprising about the South… Yes, we’ve written about biscuits and barbeque, but we’re especially interested in going beyond that.”

To hear more about how to get your clients in the mag, read: How To Pitch: Garden & Gun

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Should PR Pitch Journalists on Twitter with Direct Messages?

shutterstock_121088338

One of the big updates Twitter made this month allows users to receive direct messages from any of their followers—even if they don’t follow back. On first glance, this is good news for reporters who want to contact sources and terrible news for Justin Bieber. But what about PR? Is it a great new way to get journalists to notice your pitches or another media relations no-no?

We should note that the “receive DMs from any follower” setting is optional and that it’s not available to everyone yet—for example, we can use it on our company feed but not our personal feed. Yet some big-name journalists took to it immediately:

The natural conclusion is that if journalists enable their DM option then it’s fair game for PR. And direct messages are, in a way, harder to ignore than emails.

Here are our first thoughts on the issue:

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