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PRNewser Poll

For PR Staff Titles, A Little Creativity Goes a Long Way

Last week’s PRNewser Poll asked “How creative can publicists be with staff titles?” The votes are in, and the majority said, “Somewhat.”

Nearly half, about 48 percent, said PR firms can add a touch of whimsy to PR titles, going a little farther than the traditional account executive and VP labels we’re used to.  One comment on Twitter said titles could have a little imagination, but should stay “professional sounding to outsiders. Perception ≥ Reality.”

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PRNewser Poll: Should PR Firms Get Creative with Staff Titles?

In response to yesterday’s GolinHarris news that they would be reorganizing the company, our first thought was how someone at the SVP level, for instance, would respond to these changes.

“We’re very sensitive to this,” Fred Cook, the firm’s president and CEO, told us. “We’ve been around for 56 years and people are used to a certain structure. And we have a lot of people working for 10 or 15 years and we’re trying to make sure everybody understands their new roles and titles.”

Internally, staffers might be getting used to it, but the titles and the four new groups that are part of the g4 model — strategists, creators, connectors, and catalysts — caused some discussion externally.
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PRNewser Poll Results: The QR Code Is a Fad

Last week’s PRNewser poll focused on the QR code, which, as we noted previously, are turning up everywhere and have become an important tool for marketers. We asked if this would be the case for the long-term, or whether the QR code would go the way of the netbook, quickly becoming obsolete by newer technology.

The people have spoken and by a slim majority, respondents believe that the QR code will quickly be replaced by the next new thing.

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PRNewser Poll: Will QR Codes Follow in the Flip Cam’s Footsteps?

As we’ve noted recently, QR codes are popping up in a lot of places, and they’re becoming a popular marketing tool for a variety of industries.

However, it has been mentioned by tweeters and in the media that Google is already looking elsewhere, turning to Near Field Communications (NFC) technology. This prompted today’s PRNewser Poll question.

Will QR codes continue to grow in marketing use for the foreseeable future? Or are QR codes destined to be the next Flip cam, serving as a technological middle ground until the next big thing (in this case, smartphones/NFC) comes along and overtakes it?

Let us know what you think by next Wednesday at noon. And, as always, the comments are open.

[Image via]

PRNewser Poll Results: Which is Better for PR — Facebook or Twitter?

The votes are in, and, contrary to what I wrote previously, you say that Twitter is the better platform for publicists.  About 38 percent of respondents voted for Twitter and nearly 36 percent said it was too close to call. About 26 percent said Facebook was the better social platform. Votes were rolling in for Twitter on Twitter as well (natch), with a number of tweets declaring Twitter the clear favorite.

Of course, we’re not the first to ask the Twitter vs. Facebook question.

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PRNewser Poll: Is Facebook Better for Publicists than Twitter?

Our colleagues over at AllTwitter have written a post stating that Twitter is the better social media platform for journalists largely because it’s a fast and easy way to get news out and to leverage a network.

Talking this morning with our friend Jason Boog at Galleycat on the Morning Media Menu, we proposed that Facebook might be the better social media platform for publicists. What do you think?

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PRNewser Poll: Many Would Take A Pass on April Fools Day

The Internet was lit up with all sorts of April Fools Day hijinks on Friday. But the holiday isn’t too popular with those who responded to our PRNewser poll.

About 38 percent of respondents said April Fools sucks, while 23 percent voted Google’s gags to be the best. Pranks pulled by a couple of PR firms came in third.

Aah well. Since it looks like some people aren’t in a joking mood, here’s a video created by guys at the ICT MxR Lab who actually made Google’s Gmail Motion using Kinect.

[Video via ReadWriteWeb.]

PRNewser Poll: @CharlieSheen is Looking for an Intern. Should You Apply?

Do you have #TigerBlood? Are you all about #Winning? Can you #PlanBetter than anyone else? If so, we want you on #TeamSheen as our social media #TigerBloodIntern!

Image: Greg Gayne/Warner Bros

So begins the ad on Internships.com for an eight-week, full-time, paid summer internship with Charlie Sheen. Prospects only have until this Friday at midnight to apply. They must use 75 characters to describe why they should be chosen in the first round, and then submit a resume and further info for the second.

Sheen holds the Guinness Record for how fast he amassed a million followers, and he’s got everyone’s attention on social media and elsewhere. But, we don’t know how long that will last, how #winning the Charlie Sheen brand really is, or what it would be like to work with him.

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PRNewser Poll Results: Publicity is Good for PR Firms

A couple of weeks ago, we wrote about a Dow Jones analysis of which PR firms in the U.S. and U.K. got the most traditional media coverage in 2010.  This post captured quite a bit of attention, some of it asking the question of whether this is a good or bad thing for a PR firm.

We brought the question to you in last week’s PRNewser poll and nearly two-thirds of respondents (about 64.3 percent) said this is a positive thing. About 21.4 percent say it’s a negative thing and about 14.3 percent said it doesn’t matter.

We’ve heard a number of times from publicists that PR firms don’t have time to promote themselves because they’re busy promoting their clients. It would be great to hear more about the pros and cons, so please feel free to take to the comments with additional thoughts.

PRNewser Poll: PR Firms Making Headlines

On Friday, we reported on the results of Dow Jones’ analysis of which large and mid-sized firms in the U.S. and U.K. got the most media coverage in traditional media in 2010 (social media analysis is forthcoming). Among those on top – Hill & Knowlton, Grayling, and Allison & Partners.

We’ve heard numerous times from a variety of firms that the focus on client work makes PR for the agency a secondary concern. (And note, this analysis doesn’t say anything about who pitched what or what the sentiment of the coverage was like.) So, we’re curious -

Is it a good or bad thing to be among the firms with the most media coverage?

The poll is open until next Monday at 11:59 p.m. ET. Cast your vote.

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