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Publishing

People Magazine Sued for Discrimination

whitetalkblacktalkOften in the hallways of schools or reality TV, you will hear some dolt saying something that involves little intelligence, like, “Man, she doesn’t sound black.

As if someone who sounds black must reverberate like Barry White. Conversely, someone who “sounds white” should have a douchey resonance, speak in text lingo, and use the word “bro” without a hint of irony.

You wonder why we bring this up? Enter into the fray People magazine, which used the topic to earn itself a nice lawsuit. Read more

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Edelman Clarifies Position on Climate Change, Executive Firing

edelman-logoWe have to admit that we’re a little surprised that VICE has assumed the role of public relations overseer, but last week the publisher’s Motherboard blog earned a lot of attention by calling out Edelman over its decision not to join other firms in promising The Guardian that they would not represent climate change “skeptics.”

This was an interesting development particularly because in 2009, then-VP of CSR/Sustainability Mark Grundy told our co-founder Joe Ciarallo that “in terms of the facts, I am in no doubt of where we are with this.”

As if to further prove that the publisher is now a force to be reckoned with, Richard Edelman called the blogger himself to explain — and the follow-up post ran yesterday.

Senior Editor Brian Merchant’s query: how, if Edelman believes firmly in climate change, can it also represent the American Petroleum Institute?

Read more

Two Cleveland Newspapers Block LeBron Ad Stunt

highly questionable

ESPN’s Dan LeBatard has made his career off vitrolic opinions on sports — some are spot-on, others are not-so-much. His home is Miami and his allegiance is to the Miami Heat.

Given Lebron James’ “decision” to take his talents back to Lake Erie, LeBatard has decided that Lebron should write a thank you letter to Heat Fans. Seeing how that public plea didn’t get much traction in Cleveland, LeBatard had another idea — to purchase a full-page ad in both the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Akron Beacon Journal

Upon review, his proposal was completely denied because even newspapers don’t need ad revenue that badly.

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When Did Press Coverage of PR Explode? The New York Times ‘Chronicle’ Has Your Answer

chronicle-big

Two years ago, we first saw this report from the prestigious Nieman Journalism Lab about Chronicle, the latest digital toy from The New York Times:

“Chronicle is a database of articles and story tags from the past 31 years of Times content. The tool makes it possible to see the frequency of use of certain words — but also what people, organizations, or locations are most related to keywords.”

Today, it’s a Web-based application that traces back to the very origins of printing the news, and a divine way for the publishing giant to make some cash on the concept since that paywall thing was such a bad idea.

Logophiles: Suit up! 

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‘Knowledge Engine’ Mediander Connects Readers and Publishers

mediander

In case you’ve ever dreamed of a content aggregator focused on the higher end of the cultural ladder, last month’s BookExpo saw the launch of Mediander, a “knowledge engine” and ecommerce site described as your “one-stop destination for all different kinds of content including information, books, and videos.”

Mediander isn’t just a blog or knowledge base; it could serve as the connection between publishers and the literary set that forms their core demographic. As a recent Publishing Perspectives post put it, Mediander “promises an answer for Internet information overload.”

We recently spoke to Michael J. Fine, Founder and CEO, and Kaethe Fine, Creative Director, to learn more.

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The New York Times, Washington Post Become Strange Bedfellows with New Deal

MOZILLA

They’re going to try.

BREAKING: Newspaper publishing hasn’t been doing too well. In fact, almost as well as the rest of the news in America.

As most purveyors of the news in this lovely industry, that is an all-too-familiar, and quite heartbreaking, headline. Nonetheless, this is the world in which we live.

To combat those dwindling numbers of circulation and — even worse — those of subscribers to the dreaded paywall, publishers have been pining away to discover how to earn someone of that pre-Internet revenue back in their coffers. And so, two mortal enemies become BFFs and ironically, visit the Internet for salvation.

What is that annoying song? Oh… “What does the Fox say?”

Read more

The New Yorker PR Director Leaves for Facebook

AlexaCOn Friday Capital New York reported that Alexa Cassanos, a communications veteran who has spent nearly seven years at The New Yorker and currently serves as the publication’s senior director of PR, will leave next month for a spot on the Facebook roster.

Cassanos has an extensive history in PR at some of the biggest names in New York City’s print publishing world.

After nearly a decade at Random House, she held top positions at both Conde Nast and Bon Appetit before joining The New Yorker in 2007.

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Stephen Colbert Gives Amazon a Piece of His Mind

Amazon has been receiving more than its share of bad publicity over its little war against publisher Hachette–and thanks to Stephen Colbert and author Sherman Alexie, the company got a bit more unflattering attention last night.

The interview is worth a watch. We particularly like Alexie’s point that pre-release publicity determines the sales numbers for a given book–a message that will be very relevant to anyone who does PR for the literary world.

We’re not big conspiracy theorists, but we do find it strange that the segment preceding that interview, in which Colbert expounds on the conflict, is currently unavailable–and that Amazon signed a streaming content deal with Comedy Central exactly one year ago.

At any rate, fret not: Powell’s and Alexie did indeed receive the famous “Colbert bump” last night.

Small victories.

The New York Times Has Answer for Lost Revenue in Newspapers: NYT Opinion App

NYT OpinionLove to complain? Love to gripe? Love to just get it all off your chest? Basically, are you from New York?

If so, there’s now an app for that too. Introducing The New York Times’ answer to lost revenue in this new economy where everyone reads news on this Interweb thingy: NYT OpinionSomeone in the NYT Company is doing their homework because this says to the publishing world, “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em … and then editorialize it.”

They did and it’s working.

(NOTE: I am not from New York, but all my colleagues on PRNewser [including our fearless leader] are, so this will probably be my last post for that wise crack. Crap.) Read more

APOCALYPSE WATCH 2014: Time Begins Selling Ads on Its Cover

Time_ResponsiveIt has been 91 years. More than nine decades that the weekly stalwart of news and current events has come to us with gripping articles, stunning pictures, and the epitome of journalism. Selling its soul was the last thing anyone thought Time magazine was capable of doing.

And then the Internet happened, which changed the landscape of print journalism forever.

To wit, we have the latest sign of the Four Horsemen riding over the horizon bring the judgment with them in their saddlebags. Yes, PR professionals. Time magazine is finally selling advertising spots on its hallowed cover. The horrifying proof is after the jump… Read more

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