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Publishing

NYT PR Defends Decision to Publish the Name of Officer Darren Wilson’s Street

NYT Building

Journalists are supposed to be our storytellers, our soothsayers, our trusted cohorts who are all given carte blanche to walk into our homes or places of employment and give us — as one sage orator once opined — “just the facts, ma’am.” Yet, ethical concerns come into play every day.

This week, the conservative Washington Examiner asked the question: is it ethically acceptable to publish the name of the street on which the key figure in the world’s most controversial story recently bought a home?

Eileen Murphy, VP of corporate communications at the Times, answered “yes” and defended the paper’s decision to do so.

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Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

Conde Nast Just Learned How Much Interns Are Worth: $5.8 Million

conde nast photo

It’s been said that the internship of today is the job interview of tomorrow.

Very true; however, internships are often the misunderstood placement in any firm these days. Many are post-grad folk looking for exposure, looking for an opportunity to impress, and…well, let’s be honest, they are looking for a check.

They have been living on Ramen noodles and leftovers, because internships are high-demand, high-stress, high-drama positions that could leave you working a full-time agency job. However, when they don’t end up that way, it feels like slave labor. Namely if you weren’t paid.

Conde Nast Publications knows that feeling because 7,500 former indentured servants sued the powerhouse for $5.8 millionAnd they won. 

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If Donald Trump Hates the Media, Why Is He Doing This?

trump_hairThere are many proud organizations that focus on the ethics of journalism (e.g., National Press Club, Society for Professional Journalists, local Press Clubs…like the one in Dallas/Fort Worth, my fare burg) and others designed to foster better relationships with those journalists (e.g., PRSA, IABC).

In those prestigious institutions, one might find a dart board bearing the universally mock-able face and hairdo of Mr. Donald J. Trump.

The Don’s journalistic interests usually range from suing a journalist for cockamamie reasons to blasting the general practice for doing the job it’s supposed to do (just not to his liking). Yes, he’s an avowed media troll. Yet some journalists will do anything for eyeballs and affection, which is why Trump is keynoting a First Amendment event later this month.

That makes sense (or is it cents?)…  Read more

White House Charging Reporters $60K to Do Their Jobs

president_barack_obama-hates-press

(Photo Credits: FOXNews.com, AP)

In the PRNewserverse, we heart our journalist friends.

We appreciate their dedication to the craft of sharing stories and the sacrifices they make to do so. Consider the White House Press Corps. Their behavioral patterns follow the ebbs and flows of whatever the administration occupies the position at the time.

One small problem: President Obama isn’t that crazy about them. He has tried ignoring them, to the point of being given a petition. He has done a “Statue of Liberty” flag football move to avoid them en route to a fundraiser. He has even pointed his finger in their faces and accused them of spreading cynicism.

Now, the administration has effectively instituted a cover charge for reporters to get in the club to which they already belong.  Read more

Turns Out NPR Doesn’t Heart the Environment That Much After All

NPR HQ

This may not be breaking news, but National Public Radio (NPR) leans ever-so-slightly to the left. If someone were to poll its listeners in search of cliches, one might find a coterie of granola-eating, Democrat-having, hippie-being, skinny jean-wearing, rarely bathing (allegedly) folk.

If that “one” is not the prejudicial type, he/she might also discover that NPR is partial to good journalism and that it employs a few reporters known to evoke a love for our planet. The network even has its own division dedicated to the environment.

Or did, until a couple of days ago.

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The New York Times Ignores Spell Check…Again

NYT building

Quick question: Anyone know any editors at The New York Times? Specifically, someone who works on the front page?

You see, we in the PRNewserverse are concerned about the paper nicknamed “The Old Grey Lady” because we believe the old broad has a serious case of glaucoma. Don’t get us wrong, we heart our journo friends at the Times and believe they’re some of the best reporters in the country. Their editors, though, aren’t doing them any favors recently.

Lately, the Times has been on a roll with a string of spelling kerfuffles, and its most recent issue is something most MS Word programs will flag with quickness. Pour a little liquor on the curb for that lady…

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The New York Times Makes Front Page News for the Wrong Reasons

Publishers have held countless recent brainstorm sessions in which they clutch a dry erase board and a glass of Scotch while trying to figure out how they can get subscribers back. Ideas on the accessibility front include more responsive design, exclusive member content, better UX, and a friendly suggestion that Mr. Gorbachev tear down that PAYWALL!

To its credit, The New York Times has been leading the industry with recent apps and different ideas to get readers’ attention. However, screwing up what should be “old hat” is not going to help.

Today’s story on the South Dakota Senate race begins in the middle of a thought. Maybe the “Grey Lady” is just getting too old to catch this sort of thing…

It’s all in the tweet from reporter David Gelles:

Bulldog Reporter Puts the ‘Daily Dog’ Down After Nine Years

Bulldog ReporterBad news for the PR community as we mourn the loss of a legend: the Bulldog Reporter. 

On its own blog (supplemented by a thorough post about the PR news industry overall by Jack O’Dwyer), Bulldog Reporter Publisher Jim Sinkinson announced that “the brand’s nine-year-old online trade journal, the Daily ’Dog, will cease publication with its September 12 issue”. A further release this week indicated that the entire organization would cease operations.

Founded in 1979, the Bulldog Reporter has been a mainstay for good industry information, agency news, and stories that affect public relations professionals. But the current state of affairs in media — much less, niche outlets in PR — have forced this brand to “evolve.”

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Newspaper Publishers’ Arch-Nemesis Is Maine’s Gov. Paul LePage

MaineQuit blaming the economy, newspaper publishers. Stop accusing the Internet, National Newspapers Publishers of America (NNPA). Hey, International News Media Association (INMA), slow down on your blog hate.

Your vitriol should be aimed in one clear direction — Augusta, Maine and the office of Gov. Paul LePage.

He was at a recent GOP rally celebrating the new RNC headquarters in Androscoggin County. Sounds like a happening place, right? I suppose the sauce was flowing as he got a little randy from the lectern and shared that he hates your wretched, ink-stained guts.

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People Magazine Sued for Discrimination

whitetalkblacktalkOften in the hallways of schools or reality TV, you will hear some dolt saying something that involves little intelligence, like, “Man, she doesn’t sound black.

As if someone who sounds black must reverberate like Barry White. Conversely, someone who “sounds white” should have a douchey resonance, speak in text lingo, and use the word “bro” without a hint of irony.

You wonder why we bring this up? Enter into the fray People magazine, which used the topic to earn itself a nice lawsuit. Read more

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