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Publishing

The New York Times Ignores Spell Check…Again

NYT building

Quick question: Anyone know any editors at The New York Times? Specifically, someone who works on the front page?

You see, we in the PRNewserverse are concerned about the paper nicknamed “The Old Grey Lady” because we believe the old broad has a serious case of glaucoma. Don’t get us wrong, we heart our journo friends at the Times and believe they’re some of the best reporters in the country. Their editors, though, aren’t doing them any favors recently.

Lately, the Times has been on a roll with a string of spelling kerfuffles, and its most recent issue is something most MS Word programs will flag with quickness. Pour a little liquor on the curb for that lady…

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The New York Times Makes Front Page News for the Wrong Reasons

Publishers have held countless recent brainstorm sessions in which they clutch a dry erase board and a glass of Scotch while trying to figure out how they can get subscribers back. Ideas on the accessibility front include more responsive design, exclusive member content, better UX, and a friendly suggestion that Mr. Gorbachev tear down that PAYWALL!

To its credit, The New York Times has been leading the industry with recent apps and different ideas to get readers’ attention. However, screwing up what should be “old hat” is not going to help.

Today’s story on the South Dakota Senate race begins in the middle of a thought. Maybe the “Grey Lady” is just getting too old to catch this sort of thing…

It’s all in the tweet from reporter David Gelles:

Bulldog Reporter Puts the ‘Daily Dog’ Down After Nine Years

Bulldog ReporterBad news for the PR community as we mourn the loss of a legend: the Bulldog Reporter. 

On its own blog (supplemented by a thorough post about the PR news industry overall by Jack O’Dwyer), Bulldog Reporter Publisher Jim Sinkinson announced that “the brand’s nine-year-old online trade journal, the Daily ’Dog, will cease publication with its September 12 issue”. A further release this week indicated that the entire organization would cease operations.

Founded in 1979, the Bulldog Reporter has been a mainstay for good industry information, agency news, and stories that affect public relations professionals. But the current state of affairs in media — much less, niche outlets in PR — have forced this brand to “evolve.”

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Newspaper Publishers’ Arch-Nemesis Is Maine’s Gov. Paul LePage

MaineQuit blaming the economy, newspaper publishers. Stop accusing the Internet, National Newspapers Publishers of America (NNPA). Hey, International News Media Association (INMA), slow down on your blog hate.

Your vitriol should be aimed in one clear direction — Augusta, Maine and the office of Gov. Paul LePage.

He was at a recent GOP rally celebrating the new RNC headquarters in Androscoggin County. Sounds like a happening place, right? I suppose the sauce was flowing as he got a little randy from the lectern and shared that he hates your wretched, ink-stained guts.

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People Magazine Sued for Discrimination

whitetalkblacktalkOften in the hallways of schools or reality TV, you will hear some dolt saying something that involves little intelligence, like, “Man, she doesn’t sound black.

As if someone who sounds black must reverberate like Barry White. Conversely, someone who “sounds white” should have a douchey resonance, speak in text lingo, and use the word “bro” without a hint of irony.

You wonder why we bring this up? Enter into the fray People magazine, which used the topic to earn itself a nice lawsuit. Read more

Edelman Clarifies Position on Climate Change, Executive Firing

edelman-logoWe have to admit that we’re a little surprised that VICE has assumed the role of public relations overseer, but last week the publisher’s Motherboard blog earned a lot of attention by calling out Edelman over its decision not to join other firms in promising The Guardian that they would not represent climate change “skeptics.”

This was an interesting development particularly because in 2009, then-VP of CSR/Sustainability Mark Grundy told our co-founder Joe Ciarallo that “in terms of the facts, I am in no doubt of where we are with this.”

As if to further prove that the publisher is now a force to be reckoned with, Richard Edelman called the blogger himself to explain — and the follow-up post ran yesterday.

Senior Editor Brian Merchant’s query: how, if Edelman believes firmly in climate change, can it also represent the American Petroleum Institute?

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Two Cleveland Newspapers Block LeBron Ad Stunt

highly questionable

ESPN’s Dan LeBatard has made his career off vitrolic opinions on sports — some are spot-on, others are not-so-much. His home is Miami and his allegiance is to the Miami Heat.

Given Lebron James’ “decision” to take his talents back to Lake Erie, LeBatard has decided that Lebron should write a thank you letter to Heat Fans. Seeing how that public plea didn’t get much traction in Cleveland, LeBatard had another idea — to purchase a full-page ad in both the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Akron Beacon Journal

Upon review, his proposal was completely denied because even newspapers don’t need ad revenue that badly.

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When Did Press Coverage of PR Explode? The New York Times ‘Chronicle’ Has Your Answer

chronicle-big

Two years ago, we first saw this report from the prestigious Nieman Journalism Lab about Chronicle, the latest digital toy from The New York Times:

“Chronicle is a database of articles and story tags from the past 31 years of Times content. The tool makes it possible to see the frequency of use of certain words — but also what people, organizations, or locations are most related to keywords.”

Today, it’s a Web-based application that traces back to the very origins of printing the news, and a divine way for the publishing giant to make some cash on the concept since that paywall thing was such a bad idea.

Logophiles: Suit up! 

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‘Knowledge Engine’ Mediander Connects Readers and Publishers

mediander

In case you’ve ever dreamed of a content aggregator focused on the higher end of the cultural ladder, last month’s BookExpo saw the launch of Mediander, a “knowledge engine” and ecommerce site described as your “one-stop destination for all different kinds of content including information, books, and videos.”

Mediander isn’t just a blog or knowledge base; it could serve as the connection between publishers and the literary set that forms their core demographic. As a recent Publishing Perspectives post put it, Mediander “promises an answer for Internet information overload.”

We recently spoke to Michael J. Fine, Founder and CEO, and Kaethe Fine, Creative Director, to learn more.

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The New York Times, Washington Post Become Strange Bedfellows with New Deal

MOZILLA

They’re going to try.

BREAKING: Newspaper publishing hasn’t been doing too well. In fact, almost as well as the rest of the news in America.

As most purveyors of the news in this lovely industry, that is an all-too-familiar, and quite heartbreaking, headline. Nonetheless, this is the world in which we live.

To combat those dwindling numbers of circulation and — even worse — those of subscribers to the dreaded paywall, publishers have been pining away to discover how to earn someone of that pre-Internet revenue back in their coffers. And so, two mortal enemies become BFFs and ironically, visit the Internet for salvation.

What is that annoying song? Oh… “What does the Fox say?”

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