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Social Networks

Kim Kardashian Has Some Tips for Winning at Social Media

KimK instagram

Kim Kardashian West made an appearance at Re/code‘s Code Mobile event this week and shared some details (what else does she do besides share right?) about what it’s like to build and sustain a brand on social media and reality TV. Say what you will about Mrs. Kardashian West (don’t go over the top), this is a topic where she truly is an expert.

Before we get into the tips, she sets the record straight on her “pay-per-tweet” situation: no, she doesn’t get paid $10K per 140 characters.

And she loves the BlackBerry, which would seemingly put her in the minority among owners of mobile devices.

“It’s my heart and soul, I love it and I’ll never get rid of it,” she said. “I do have an iPhone, and I use it for photos. But if you write an email and you need to type fast — I like having the [key]board. They don’t even have them in stores anymore. I buy them on eBay. It’s a BlackBerry Bold. And I like to have three in my room that I line up in case they break.”

You don’t hear that every day!

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Madeline Albright, Queen Elizabeth Win Twitter

On the lighter side of things, former Secretary of State Madeline Albright is on a roll, isn’t she?  Last week Wheaties called her a “champion” and this week she proved that she’s just as good at Twitter trolling as she is at statesmanship and spokesmanship (which IS SO TOO a word, autocorrect).

We missed this one while prepping for an event, but Conan got schooled on his C+ joke:

And she kept going.

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Why Gwyneth Paltrow Is to Blame for Whisper’s Failure as a Media Source

whisperEarlier this summer, Whisper — the creepers app that allows people to send and receive meme-ified messages anonymously — wanted to become a viable news source.

The idea: if you have real, possibly unflattering news to share and don’t want to be outed by the soothsayers at TMZ, you post it on Whisper.

Also: a legitimate source is now some dude with a smartphone, a happy trigger-finger, and an axe to grind.

Then, came along Gwyneth Paltrow to ruin all the fun.  Read more

15 Brands That Played the Boss for #NationalBossDay

BE THE BOSS

Paid the cost…

Did you know that yesterday was National Boss Day? Neither did we — but many brands reminded us via the 13th hottest trending hashtag of the day. (Sadly, we missed the chance to thank our own boss.)

Anyway, here are some of the many that took advantage of the latest meme-y holiday.

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10 Biggest and 5 Most Surprising Brands ‘Friended’ by Millennials

Facebook BEER

No alcohol here, sorry.

Recent studies have told us that the kids these days just aren’t really into brands on social media. WPP found that 55 percent of young Americans don’t see the point of “friending” a brand, and Edelman told us yesterday that a vast majority of consumers simply aren’t satisfied with the “relationships” they have with corporate entities online — even the ones whose products they buy.

Many brands, however, have managed to accumulate thousands, if not millions, of Millennial “fans.” Independent ad agency Moosylvania recently conducted a survey of 1,500 young people to identify the top 50 such brands, and we’ve reviewed the first 10 for this post.

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The Guardian Wonders Whether Twitter Will Grow Up to Be a ‘PR Platform’

twitter handJane Martinson of The Guardian wrote an interesting piece yesterday about the departure of Twitter’s head of news, Vivian Schiller. It’s really yet another attempt to answer the seemingly unanswerable question: can Twitter make money?

We were most taken, however, with the idea that Twitter has to choose between being a service for journalists or one for PR.

Martinson’s point is that most people simply don’t use the network very often — and those who do tend to work in media, politics or communications. She opines that Martinson left once she realized that her only real responsibility was to convince more reporters to tweet regularly, Dean Baquet be damned.

The idea is that, while Twitter is almost always the best source for breaking news in real-time, the eyeballs and ad dollars belong firmly in the Facebook camp.

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STUDY: Influencers Know the ‘Sponsored Social’ Game Better Than Marketers

shutterstock_192589274

Influential!

IZEA, the self-described “pioneer of social sponsorship”, knows a bit about connecting clients with popular social media users in the interest of increased exposure and, of course, sales.

Last week saw the release of the company’s fifth annual “State of Sponsored Social” report created in collaboration with research firm Halverson Group in order to reveal trends in that rapidly growing digital niche.

The big finding: sponsored social is now the second most common digital marketing tool behind only the trusted display ad.

Also:

  • A majority of marketers (52 percent) have a separate budget for paid social promos.
  • Most don’t pay via the old “free product samples”…they use cold cash.
  • The amount of money involved is increasing: “influencers” on the whole reportedly derive 63 percent of their income from sponsorships

In short, this isn’t your classic PR model. We asked IZEA Founder/CEO Ted Murphy for his take on the report.

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Will New, ‘Private’ Networks Threaten the Social Media Establishment?

social keyboard

The big story in social right now concerns privacy…or the lack thereof. As Twitter sues the U.S. government over data collection and Facebook announces plans to release an “anonymity” app, other networks have attempted to use the controversy to get attention.

Ello is the obvious one; brands, “influencers” and bored users making fun of the same have already begun joining the “ad-free” network. Snapchat still says it’s more private than its competitors despite admitting that those initial claims weren’t quite accurate and agreeing to “start a wide-ranging privacy program that will be independently monitored for 20 years.”

Then there’s Netropolitan, “the online country club for people with more money than time” (yes, that is a real tagline).

So: coveted headlines aside, can these upstarts really threaten the Twitter/Facebook monopoly?

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Taliban Spokesman Reveals His Location via Twitter, Claims Conspiracy

taliban-fighters-300x225You may be shocked to learn on this Monday morning that one of the world’s most visible terrorist organizations has some trouble managing its social media presence.

Nearly two years ago, we noted that the Taliban had inadvertently revealed its entire mailing list thanks to a spokesperson who mistook “cc” for “bcc” when sending a press release to media contacts (and friendly Afghan politicians/warlords). We had a laugh at his rookie error before getting a little upset over the fact that the group A) has a media spokesman, B) distributes press releases and C) included a disturbing number of the United States’ own “allies” within the Afghan government on its distribution list.

Over the weekend, the group proved once again that it isn’t the greatest on social: its spokesperson accidentally showed the world his secret location via Twitter’s geomapping feature.

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4 Takes on Facebook’s ‘New’ Paid Media Platform

Fbook coffee

This year’s Advertising Week has already involved plenty of high-profile speakers and events that we were unable to attend. But one of the biggest announcements concerned Facebook and the relaunch of its cookie-free paid content placement platform, Atlas.

This doesn’t just concern ad agencies — it’s a big deal to anyone working in paid media. In short, it will supposedly help marketers better prove the ROI of their clients’ social media investments.

We asked our contacts in the marketing world for their takes on what the new development means to the marketing industry at large.

Adam Miller, social media specialist at Walker Sands Communications:

“Facebook’s relaunch of Atlas stresses the importance of tying digital marketing efforts and social media marketing together. Facebook is restoring an old Microsoft initiative after acquiring it 16 months ago. The relaunch was meant to help marketers serve ads based on demographics rather than cookies. As consumers use a variety of devices to surf the internet and learn about different companies, Atlas gives agencies with integrated marketing programs the opportunity to better target their audience without the limits of cookies.

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