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STUDY: 84% of Vegans Return to Being Meatheads

vegetarian bacon

Just when herbivores — be they vegan or vegetarian — thought they had all this good mojo going into the holidays and didn’t have to make that hapless “I’ll start dieting” resolution, comes some bad news and buyer’s remorse.

According to the Humane Research Council, more than 84 percent of all veggie lovers relapse to the tune of a steak dinner. And then, Che Green, executive director of the HRC, provides the Captain Obvious moment of 2014:

“It’s obviously a negative for animals.”

Good one, Che.

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Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

SURVEY: 80 Percent of Americans Wouldn’t Call a Native American ‘That Word’

Redskins FailWhile many Americans now enjoy the sights, sounds and PR crises of the 21st century, the entire board of directors and ownership of the NFL team in Washington refuses to remove their collective nose from another, older time.

ICYMI: The “Washington Redskins” have a few PR hurdles to overcome if they want to stick with a name dripping in history (the racist kind). The latest nail in the coffin would be an enlightening survey that finds: “four in five Americans would be uncomfortable calling a Native American a ‘r*dskin.’”

Daniel Snyder (or even Mr. “No Means No“): please pick up the white courtesy phone.

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STUDY: Got Milk? You Might Need Life Insurance, Too

yoda got milkRemember the campaign “Got Milk?”

It was greatness. It was a hall-of-famer. It was a catalyst for a milk-drinking and bovine-appreciating renaissance.

Back in June 1993, shoppers who weren’t quite sure what to take with their Lucky Charms got a bit of help via this inventive campaign.

Pity, because — according to a new study performed in Sweden – drinking more than three glasses of milk a day raises the risk of fractures and early death.

What was that about doing a body good?  Read more

STUDY: 83 Percent of Consumers ‘Unsatisfied’ by Relationships with Brands

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Edelman released its second annual “brandshare” study this week, and the project’s findings are both challenging and encouraging. In short, consumers are not completely satisfied by their relationships with the brands they know — and the industry is moving closer to determining what, exactly, such “relationships” should entail. Most importantly, brands that created “multidimensional” relationships with consumers saw big, measurable gains.

Some of the study’s findings serve as a good follow-up to a survey released by WPP in September, which found that 55 percent of respondents simply don’t see the point of “friending” a brand. Highlights:

  • 87 of respondents around the world say they want “meaningful relationships” with brands
  • Yet 66 percent say brands don’t share with them at all — and 70 percent say that, when they do, it’s only due to “a self-centered desire to increase profits”

Today we spoke to Jen Cohan, president of Edelman New York, to learn more about takeaways from this year’s brandshare.

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STUDY: What Recent Numbers on Workplace Identity Could Say About PR

Gallup recently took a poll of U.S. workers to get a glimpse of fulfillment in the workplace. As a part of its annual Work and Education poll, employed Americans were asked if they get a sense of identity from their job.

More than 55 percent shared with Gallup that their job makes up who they are while 42 percent said that their job was just something they happened to do for a living.

gallup poll identity

Here’s the question for every PRNewser out there: What does this say about the public relations industry, if anything? 

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AT&T’s ‘It Can Wait’: Even Admirable Campaigns Can’t Wait to Succeed

att-it-can-wait

Back in my fare burg of Dallas lives the telecom behemoth known as AT&T. One of its largest undertakings was the PSA campaign for It Can Wait. The clarion call for no texting and driving was a necessary one — and one AT&T put few limits on spreading.

It started in September 2009, and five years later, it is still being heralded as one of the country’s best campaigns. Only one problem: No one that should care does.

Awards. Awareness. Accolades. They don’t really matter without any action.

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POLLING ALL PR TYPES: What Do You Want to Be Called?

Hello-my-name-is

Here’s a serious question: What do you want to be called by your colleagues in the industry, pals in the media, partners and clients?

Everyone in this not-quite-fabled industry has an idea of what they like and don’t like, what they hear and ignore, what they answer to and what they wish no one would ever call them.

Some are accustomed to the big agency titles of account executive, manager, director, supervisor, and other synonyms for “hierarchy.” Others are interested in the boutique titles of guru, ninja, expert, and other nom de plumes that mean “badass.”

Before you jump, think about it: If you had to be labeled, what would your label read?

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The Art of ‘Um’ and ‘Uh’: Different Vocal Pokes for Different Media Folks

likeIf you have spent any time in PR, you know there are a fair number of media trainers. Typically, these are hacks-turned-flacks who understand how to help clients talk to the media without sounding like remedial English students.

That brings us to a lingustic affliction called Speech Disfluency.

SD involves speaking with “any of various breaks, irregularities, or non-lexical vocables that occurs within the flow of otherwise fluent speech”. You may think of stuttering or hesitating, but this definition also refers to the use of the universal word (and media no-no) “Huh.” (True story, look it up.)

We call those “vocal crutches.” And now — thanks to some deep, battle-of-the-sexes-type research, such crutches can demonstrate one’s gender you are during one of those deep throat interviews.

So, like, see it, um, after the jump…

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STUDY: Social Media Is Winning PR War for Anti-Fracking Groups

Signs protesting the process of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, are seen near the town of Calicoon Center, New YorkWe’ve written frequently about the PR war over hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” — anti-fracking and environmental groups VS. the energy companies that have adopted the controversial practice. Now, a recent study by Makovsky suggests that while both sides may be impassioned and dedicated to winning the debate, the war is being fought on two different battle grounds, and the side utilizing social media appears to be the side that’s winning.

The survey revealed that 57% of U.S. consumers believe that fracking is one of the three most important environmental issues today. Furthermore, 65% of respondents (71% in fracking cities) say they hear about the issue at least weekly, and 77% say they hear about it primarily from internet news sites and social media.

Now here’s the kicker: the study also found that the vast majority of social media mentions of the subject are coming from anti-fracking activists and groups. In fact, of the 1.3 million Twitter mentions of fracking from January through July 2014, anti-fracking activists generated 2000% more impressions than groups supportive of the practice. Let us spell that out again… two-thousand percent! Read more

STUDY: Government Approval Ratings Hit All-Time Lows

uncle-sam-gun-to-headIf you watch the news for any amount of time, you may notice that our government has a perception problem that transcends any intra-party squabbles: pretty much no one has a good thing to say about the U.S. government, the people running it, or even those most affected by it.

Now, the latest related poll by NBC News and the Wall Street Journal, adds to the dogpile.

In the national poll, we discover that President Obama’s approval rating has plummeted to its lowest ever position at 41 percent. Even worse, 71 percent of Americans believe this country is headed in the wrong direction.

Good news though: the approval rating for Congress has increased from 11 to 14 percent, so there’s that.

Le sigh.

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