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Posts Tagged ‘7-Eleven’

7-Eleven Launches Pop-Up Gay Wedding Chapel

Earlier today our own Shawn Paul Wood asked a serious question: is Target’s statement in support of same-sex marriage really a heartfelt advocacy move or just another publicity stunt?

Now we can offer you a counter-example via the oddest source: 7-Eleven. In Stockholm. To celebrate last week’s Pride Parade, the convenience chain (which amusingly compared itself to Uber in a recent strategy document) created a pop-up wedding chapel with the help of Swedish PR/marketing agency Wenderfalck.

Here’s the homepage, which certainly seems like a legitimate attempt to bring the tagline “Oppet for alla” (open for all) to life. The events even included “one of few openly homosexual Imams, who presided over the marriage of a lesbian Islamic couple.”

This kind of stunt isn’t technically new for 7-Eleven, which got a bit of press attention way back in 1992 for doubling as a chapel for a couple of lucky Detroit lovebirds. Still, we’d like to see Target pull a move like this.

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7-Eleven’s Birthday Week Thwarted Because of New App Glitch, Makes It Right All Month Long

slurpees

ICYMI: these glorious sugary rainbows of greatness were being given away 12 ounces at a time on July 11. Free. (Get it? 7 [July] 11?)

It’s been a tradition since 2002 that anyone can waltz inside a local 7/11, grab a small 12 oz. cup, and fill up on this sweet elixir of Texas love (born here, based here, y’all). This year, something went awry when 7-Eleven attempted to bring more technology to the mix. For months, the convenience empire has been promoting its fun little ‘Only at 7-Eleven’ app. When you download it, you would benefit from push-text offers sent exclusively to your phone.

Only, that didn’t happen for some folks, and America went nuts.

Read more

Coke’s All-Digital, Teen-Targeted ‘AHH Effect’ Campaign Proves AHH-ffective

It’s been almost six months since Coca-Cola launched its first ever teen-targeted, all-digital, content-based campaign, The AHH Effect, which has been continually releasing new “experiences” via multiple variations of www.ahh.com (each including one more “H” in its URL). Each site features “a teen-worthy moment of randomness, creativity and delight that’s best experienced from teens’ favorite gadgets – their mobile devices.” Just in the past month, 20 more AHH.com URLs have gone live.

In case the all-caps have confused you, the “AHH” in AHH Effect is not meant as a panicked scream, but as a satisfied sigh. Coke’s initial release about the campaign described it this way:

The AHH Effect” is that multidimensional feeling of happiness, satisfaction and delicious refreshment one experiences after drinking an ice-cold Coke. It’s been described as the sound a smile would make if smiles made sounds, and it’s the centerpiece of a new teen-focused program from Coca-Cola. Bringing to life 61 dimensions of ‘AHH’ through a range of digital experiences, from games and films to GIFs, the program showcases all of the qualities of Coke and positions the beverage as the ultimate refresher.”

Included in the latest batch of experiences are several created with some of Coca-Cola’s key customer partners, including McDonalds, AMC Theatres, Six Flags and 7-Eleven. The brands partnered to explore the AHH Effect, and used the same combination of “gamification” and whimsy that Coke used during the initial launch of the campaign. For instance, the experience created with Six Flags, “Don’t Spill The Coke,” is a fast-paced game in which users try to keep their Coca-Cola from tipping over while riding a rollercoaster.

A seriously clever campaign that touches on many things digital experts point to when dealing with teens: their love of mobile devices, short attention spans, and willingness to engage others in something that interests them. But is it working?

Statistics gathered by Coke would point to the AHH-firmative. Read more

The Onion Helps Brands Discover Their Sense of Humor

The Onion is all about funny, satirical, almost believable stories. When we first heard about Vladimir Putin’s plan to pump up Russia’s fertility rate with a Boyz II Men concert, we immediately thought of the magazine.

But now we know that’s not all “America’s Finest News Source” can do. See, Digiday taught us something this week: The Onion also helps brands discover (or re-discover) their sense of humor via its in-house ad/marketing/advisory team, Onion Labs. This strange experiment all started last year when Microsoft Internet Explorer, desperate for a rebranding, decided to embrace its reputation as “The Browser You Loved to Hate” and ask The Onion‘s advisory team for ideas (one of which was this cute “Child of the 90′s” video). The project grew rapidly from there.

Onion Labs is still relatively new, but the group’s site features a series of funny spots for brands as disparate as Jack Links and 7-Eleven. They’ve also worked on social media campaigns like the #vacationitis project for Hilton Hotels and Resorts.

We can certainly see why the Onion Labs aesthetic appeals to so many brands–if you’re not comfortable making fun of yourself then you’re going to have trouble appealing to that crucial 18-30 demographic. Here’s one of the Lab’s commercials pitching Dove deodorant to men by making light of the fact that guys don’t really like to deal with their dry skin problems:

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NY Soda Ban Opponents Bring Race Into the Debate

In case you hadn’t heard, New York mayor Michael Bloomberg won his battle with “big soda”, banning extra-large servings of sugar water via a unanimous City Board of Health vote. The ban will take effect in March, but this doesn’t mean the conflict is over–far from it. See, Coca-Cola may admit to making Americans fat, but the world’s biggest brand will continue to fight for its right to sell ridiculously oversized portions to anyone who cares to buy them.

Now comes the next phase–and big soda chose a very interesting PR approach this time by enlisting the NAACP and the Hispanic Federation to argue against the ban on racial terms. During the first courtroom arguments in the class action suit filed against Bloomberg and the city, representatives from these organizations argued that the ban would disproportionately “hurt small and minority-owned businesses while doing little to help health” and placing said businesses at a further disadvantage when compared to their larger rivals. Of course, soda also plays a crucial role in boosting obesity rates within minority communities, but we’ll just forget about that for now.

Here’s the real shocker: these groups don’t just receive lots of donations from Coke, Pepsi and other soft drink brands; they also give them awards for outstanding “corporate leadership”. This isn’t to say that social advocacy groups should be immune to the usual lobbying nonsense, but the completely unsurprising revelation does damage the credibility of this particular PR initiative while simultaneously diluting the larger and far more important mission of these civil rights advocacy groups. It’s very unfortunate.

One thing that does really bother us about this ban: it will exclude 7-Eleven, home of the famous “Big Gulp”. Why? Because, for some reason, the city can’t legally regulate convenience and supermarket chains (which are slowly smothering its classic bodegas). That’s just dumb.

Wine Industry Turning to Millennial Love of Booze

With 70 million millennials out there (20 million of them about to turn 21), wine marketers are now turning their attention to the age group, which, according to Ad Age, is picking up a love for vino earlier than previous generations.

Beer still accounts for the lion’s share of alcoholic beverages that millennials consume (42 percent). However, wine accounts for 20 percent of alcohol consumed by millennials, a jump from 13 percent for Gen X.

Read more

Celebs Lending a Hand to Cause Campaigns

The Huffington Post has a few stories focused on celebrity philanthropic campaigns. The video above comes from Feeding America and its “Hunger Is A Real Story” campaign, which enlisted celebrities like Matt Damon to act out the stories of real people who are going hungry.

According to the campaign’s press release, more than 50 million Americans live with hunger. The campaign includes advertising and a Spanish PSA in addition to clips like this one available on the Web.

Will Ferrell is also among the celebrities participating in 7-Eleven‘s “Coffee Cup with a Cause” campaign, which aims to donate $2 million to charities. They’re raising money through the proceeds from coffee sold in cups designed by the celebrity spokespeople. Among the charities benefiting are Ferrell’s choice, Cancer for College.

Finally, West Virginia native (and wife to Ben Affleck, who’s also participating in the Feeding America campaign) Jennifer Gardner heads home to benefit Save the Children.

Additional philanthropy and nonprofit coverage is available on HuffPo’s Impact page.

Slurpee Truck Tour Heading to D.C.

During Wednesday’s press conference, President Obama invited Republicans to the White House to enjoy Slurpees, a beverage he called “a delicious drink.” This was an opportunity that 7-Eleven couldn’t let slip.

The company has launched a truck tour that left Dallas on Friday and will end in Washington D.C. Along the way they’re offering freebies, giving Slurpee-loving Americans the opportunity to mix and match flavors, including the new “Purple for the People.” And, of course, there’s a Facebook page.

The company has also offered to install Slurpee machines in the White House and host a Slurpee Summit.

“I don’t know about a Slurpee,” USA Today quotes Rep. John Boehner (OH) . “How about a glass of merlot?”