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Posts Tagged ‘AdAge’

Under Armour Comms VP Explains Damage Control Strategy

Here’s a quick but relevant clip that our friends at AdAge posted yesterday.

Diane Pelkey — VP of global communications for Under Armour — explains how the brand tackled the fallout from the bombshell February Wall Street Journal story in which members of the U.S. speed skating team blamed the company’s products for their disappointing performance at the Sochi Olympics.

Pelkey’s point is simple, and it’s worth repeating: be transparent, don’t hide from the story and make sure to offer all relevant spokespeople to media contacts for comment.

While the success of the ensuing campaign may be up for debate, the logic behind the strategy is sound.

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Here Are Our Favorite Super Bowl Odds and Ends

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So…two days left until the most important day of the year for branded promotions. The 6,329 “credentialed journalists” covering the event will make sure to inform you about every last detail of the game and related ads/stunts, but for now we thought we’d share some of our favorite football tidbits, sent to us by our friends in the industry.

First we have a couple of ways to make the game (and the ads) a little more fun.

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Wet Seal Lets a 16-Year-Old Borrow Its Snapchat Account for the Weekend

55332_3327d0185629405b9ebbde34a1d7699e_eedbafe18fd49e5598935709c49efa8fHere’s an interesting story from AdAge today: teen clothing/accessories brand Wet Seal has handed the keys to its newly minted Snapchat account to social media ninja who doesn’t even have her driver’s license.

We may be wrong, but this feels like a first.

On the one hand, it makes a lot of sense: self-described “beauty vlogger” MissMeghanMakeup has more than 200,000 YouTube subscribers and nearly 50K Twitter followers, most of whom fall right in the middle of the brand’s target demo.

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The president of Wet Seal’s agency ICED Media calls Meghan “an influencer in the teen space”, though something tells us she wouldn’t have used that wording herself unless she’s already more of a marketer than we thought.

On the other hand, if we were in charge of social for Wet Seal we don’t know that we’d let any 16-year-old handle our brand new Snapchat account.

We can’t see the 15+ snaps that formed her “story” other than the image provided to AdAge because they disappeared after 24 hours, but we’re gonna call this a potential trend—especially since Wet Seal isn’t the only brand interested in MissMeghan’s services.

Whatever came from the partnership, it had to be more interesting than Senator Rand Paul’s “thanks for following me” snap.

Publicis Groupe Buys D.C. Crisis Comms Agency Qorvis

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The growth of whatever will be Publicis Omnicom continued unabated today as Publicis Groupe purchased 100% of Qorvis, a D.C.-based agency specializing in the kind of crisis comms that a certain sweaty governor needs right now.

According to the release, Qorvis will join Publicis’ MSLGROUP to become Qorvis MSLGROUP, which will be (as the tagline reads) “a new powerhouse in Washington”; the deal also includes the acquisition of Clarus Research Group.

Qorvis founder/managing partner Michael Petruzzello will stay on as president; he will double as the agency’s North America practice director of public affairs reporting to MSLGROUP’s North American president Renee Wilson.

Fear not, fretful politicians in poor public standing: you’ll get the same excellent service you’ve always known with a slightly more cumbersome name.

(H/T AdAge)

Someone Should Tell Clients That Super Bowl Ads Aren’t Worth the Money

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Or you could just direct them toward this study, published in AdAge. Its point is pretty simple: while Super Bowl ads do spark conversations, they’re more about entertainment value than anything else—and a strong majority do not “increase purchase intent” at all.

One researcher tells AdAge that “brand association with Super Bowl commercials is much lower than you’d get with a typical buy”, because viewers remember the commercial itself rather than the product within. Car spots are particularly ineffective because “they all run together in people’s minds”—and can we get a “hell yes” here? The phrases “no money down” and “anti-lock brakes” are all but meaningless to us now.

Jim Horton takes things a step further on the Online Public Relations Thoughts blog, writing that the study’s findings reaffirm the value of PR:

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The Next Chapter in the ‘PR vs. Marketing vs. Advertising’ Debate Is Here

Obvious statement of the day: the debate over who “owns” content marketing, native/paid media and social will only heat up in the months and years to come as agencies fight (politely) for clients’ money. But the latest chapter in this timeless face-off appears to be unfolding in record time.

First comes news that big-name ad agency McCann Erickson will significantly expand upon a unit it founded last year to exclusively tackle social media projects. The unit, now called “McCann Always On” (get it?), will “[build] social media-centric marketing plans” rather than just managing clients’ pages and feeds in an attempt to back up the agency’s “sure, we can do that!” claims.

This announcement follows a telling New York Times article by advertising specialist Stuart Elliot, who reported that a growing number of ad/marketing copywriters have mastered the subtle art of “LOLspeak” as their agencies integrate more social content into client campaigns.

On the PR side, Weber Shandwick just announced its plans to expand upon the traditional definition of a PR firm by launching a new content-focused unit called MediaCo.

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Oreo Agency 360i Just Won HBO’s Social Media Account

Today AdAge brings news that 360i, the digital agency responsible for all those creative Oreo tweets you’ve read so much about this year, will now handle social media marketing for HBO — and this right after we posted on how Game of Thrones always has the best promo swag!

The premium cable giant, which brought its social operations in-house in 2007, chose 360i to create campaigns designed to stir the buzz among fans online. The agency’s team will rep HBO at the same time as the folks at Campfire, the NYC firm responsible for creating several innovative fan engagement campaigns on the channel’s behalf. According to an internal release, Campfire’s latest work for HBO involved the second annual “pledge your allegiance” campaign promoting the release of season 2 on DVD this February.

Click through for a case study video of the release date event, complete with awesome ice sculpture:

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How Big Data Brought Us the GEICO Gecko

Back in October (when this PRNewser writer dressed as Flo for Halloween), we discussed the popularity of brand mascots like Progressive‘s Flo, Allstate‘s Mayhem and the GEICO Gecko — and what it means for a company when a character created solely for the purpose of selling a product becomes something of a pop culture icon.

Relevant research at the time indicated that, while the public’s love for these quirky insurance pushers undoubtedly helped bring some personality to an otherwise drab product, it didn’t necessarily always correlate with sales.

Now, thanks to a revealing interview in AdAge, we’ve learned that there may be a more direct correlation between the Gecko and his company’s sales. The spokes-lizard was never intended to be the longstanding fixture he has become. But, as GEICO CMO Ted Ward explains in the interview, the ever-improving marketing tool known as data analytics made it clear that The Gecko was making an impact:

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‘Bad Pitch Blog’ Co-Founder Kevin Dugan on the Art of Pitching

Today’s guest post comes to you courtesy of our friends at PressDoc, the (social) media-friendly press release distribution, tracking and measurement service. To celebrate the release of PressList, a new service designed to help users pitch stories to journalists, the PressDoc team conducted a series of Q&As with experts in the field.

Their first interview subject is Kevin Dugan, a veteran of both the journalism and PR disciplines. He is the co-author of the Bad Pitch Blog, winner of an Award of Commendation in the Blog category from the Public Relations Society of America and a listed member of the AdAgePower 150“. He tweets under the @prblog handle. 

From your experience, which email pitches do journalists pay attention to, and what makes them read the press release?

Pitching success boils down to relevance. In fact, the list is more important than the pitch. If it’s relevant? It can be long. It can have large attachments. I don’t care because I’m focused on the relevant content and not how it was packaged.

How often is it relevant? Rarely.

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Coca-Cola Says Social Media Buzz Does Not Boost Sales

Coca-Cola This week, a Coca-Cola representative made a statement that will create more than a few headaches in marketing, PR and advertising departments around the country. For all the talk of encouraging the conversation online, social media buzz does not appear to translate into short-term revenue gains (at least for Coke). Oh, and print ads are the most effective way for Coke to drive per-impression sales. Surprised?

It’s a very dramatic announcement coming from a company with more than 60 million Facebook fans. But don’t freak out just yet–and don’t start gently lowering clients’ expectations, either. According to AdAge, Coke’s senior manager of marketing strategy Eric Schmidt (no relation) warned his audience at the Advertising Research Foundation‘s Re:Think 2013 conference not to read too much into the bombshell headline.

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