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Posts Tagged ‘Best Buy’

10 Biggest and 5 Most Surprising Brands ‘Friended’ by Millennials

Facebook BEER

No alcohol here, sorry.

Recent studies have told us that the kids these days just aren’t really into brands on social media. WPP found that 55 percent of young Americans don’t see the point of “friending” a brand, and Edelman told us yesterday that a vast majority of consumers simply aren’t satisfied with the “relationships” they have with corporate entities online — even the ones whose products they buy.

Many brands, however, have managed to accumulate thousands, if not millions, of Millennial “fans.” Independent ad agency Moosylvania recently conducted a survey of 1,500 young people to identify the top 50 such brands, and we’ve reviewed the first 10 for this post.

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The 10 Biggest PR Losers of 2013

Oh sure, he looks happy NOW...

Sure, he’s happy now. Just wait ’til he wakes up tomorrow.

Now that 2014 has granted us nearly 48 hours’ worth of hard-earned hindsight, we’d like to pull out our overgeneralizing caps and name the ten biggest losers of the past year.

This list isn’t about individual failures destined to be remembered for decades: it’s more about the entities that lost the public’s trust in 2013.

So check it out and feel free to disagree with us, because that’s what the Internet is all about.

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Canadian Airline’s Christmas Stunt Goes Viral (Again)

We will probably never use the word “heartwarming” in a sentence, and we didn’t cry at this WestJet “Christmas miracle” stunt (botched facelift). But quite a few people have apparently teared up while watching the clip in the two days since it went live. And yes, this is the same brand behind last year’s “flash mob” stunt.

It had to be pretty elaborate in order to convince surfers to watch it for 5 and a half minutes, and indeed it is.

Via the good people at PR Examples, here’s why they did it.

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Update Your Jargon Dictionary! Many Aunts Are Now ‘PANKs’

PANK — Professional aunt, no kids. Apparently, this is the target market for the holiday.

The word is the creation of Melanie Notkin, aka The Savvy Auntie. She partnered with Weber Shandwick and KRC Research on a study which found that 1 in 5 women is a PANK. That’s 23 million American women who are willing to spend $9 billion per year on the special kids in their lives. They’re 36 years old on average, more than half (52 percent) are single and have never been married, and just about a third of them make $50K or more per year. They’re hooked up on social media and work full-time.

Sisters are doing it for themselves. And companies want all those lovely ladies to spend that auntie money with them this year.

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Best Buy Wants You to Film Yourself Standing in Line on Black Friday

Oh hey: remember this holiday classic?

How about this one?

Best Buy is hoping against hope that nothing like that happens this year. In fact, they’re so sure that everything will go smoothly on Black Friday that they’re encouraging customers to Vine the experience. And by “the experience” we mean the process of waiting in line to shop at Best Buy.

Bad idea, you say? AllThingsD called it “risky”, which is an understatement.

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$99 ‘Useless Box’ Makes it to Best Buy Shelves Thanks to Clever Prank

If you’ve ever had a printer break down on you mid-project, or watched helplessly as your ultra-expensive laptop crashed, effectively rendering all of your precious files nonexistent, you’ve likely felt as though you shelled out a ridiculous amount of cash for what, in the end, amounted to little more than a useless plastic box.

Playing upon this common frustration, street artist Plastic Jesus created a fake Best Buy product called “useless plastic box,” and stealthily sneaked it onto the shelves of five Los Angeles-area Best Buy stores. The accompanying (perfectly branded) tags listed a price of $99.99, and boasted a product description that included phrases like “will not work once you get it home,” and “battery life too short to be of use.” The warranty reads: “There is no warranty with this piece of crap. If you are dumb enough to buy it you deserve all you get.”

In response to the prank and subsequent media attention, Jon Sandler, a spokesman for Best Buy, told AdFreak: Read more

eBay Banks on Time to Deliver Online Glory

We live. And then we die.

Time is of the essence.

The public, understandably, hates waiting for anything. We want our food fast, our deliveries now and the transactions in our lives to be instantaneous. Money comes with many benefits, but perhaps the greatest power money holds is that it can save us time. eBay, the once darling and maverick of the Internet, has now entered the time game.

The brand has just launched the eBay Now app where customers can order anything carried by partners such as Best Buy, Macy’s, REI and Target, and have it delivered within an hour. Yes, 60 minutes. The time it takes you to remember you forgot that digital camera with which you were supposed to film your interview with the star of the documentary you’ve been working on for six years. Time changes everything, and eBay is hoping that time with compel customers to pay for convenience.

Saving customers time is a marketing strategy as old as time, and has worked well for every business endeavor from convenience stores to pizza delivery. Anyone in the public who has been to a funeral knows the importance of time, and so we’re guessing eBay Now will be a popular app with consumers—particularly those consumers experiencing a moment of weakness upon discovering they’ve forgotten something important, something they need now.

Is the eBay Now app enough to catapult the brand back into the online superstardom? We’ll have to wait and see as the public decides. But we all have a friend addicted to eBay, and if addicts like one thing, it’s instant gratification.

Retailers Fight ‘Showrooming’ by Charging Visitors to Browse

“Showrooming” is a relatively new phenomenon in the retail world, but it appears to be growing. It’s basically the act of visiting a physical store, checking out the prices on the items you want, then buying them online for less. (We assume celebrities hire people to do this sort of thing, but what do we know.)

So customers walk around stores armed with their smartphones, checking to make sure they can get that TV or iPad a little cheaper on Amazon. It’s a big deal for retailers because, of course, their ultimate goal to encourage browsers to actually buy stuff. And they’re dealing with it in different ways.

Best Buy, for example, rolled out a promo campaign to combat “showrooming” by promising consumers that it would match or beat the price offered by local and online retailers for every product in stock. Bold move, but this week Reddit users found an Australian specialty foods retailer with an even more brazen approach: charging customers $5 just to browse.

Frankly, we don’t think this approach will work. It implies that the retailer simply doesn’t trust the public — which is a terrible PR move. If it were a high-end store then charging visitors $5 to look around might make sense. But don’t most people visit the Gucci store just to browse anyway? It’s not like anyone can actually afford that stuff.

10 Brands That Do Customer Service Right on Twitter

Here’s an interesting fact: 30% of top brands now have “dedicated customer service Twitter handles”. This makes perfect sense, right? Customers value great service above all else, they love the instant gratification of social media and they really, really hate waiting for reps to pick up the phone. Also: by establishing separate Twitter handles for customer service, brands can “divert negative attention and activity” away from the primary feed.

So what goes into running a great customer service operation in the twittersphere? In order to find out, we poked around and found ten examples of brands that are doing it right, starting with some of the biggest.

1. Nike Support: This one is pretty much the gold standard. A quick glance at the account with all replies shows you how quickly and how often the feed’s managers respond to individual customers.

2. Xbox Support: Xbox boldly claims to hold the Guinness World Record for “most responsive Twitter feed”–and based on the number of replies their team posts every minute, we can see why they make that claim.

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CEOs Working Retail: Smart Move or PR Stunt?

It’s tough being a CEO. No, seriously: How can the head of a retail giant maintain a positive pseudo-relationship with hundreds or even thousands of employees when it’s hard enough for C-levels at small businesses to let all their people know that they care?

Hubert Joly, newly appointed CEO of big-box chain Best Buy, decided to pull a twist on the “Undercover Boss” concept and work on the floor in a retail capacity for the first week of his new job.

What’s the reasoning behind this move? Apparently Joly wants to counter criticisms about his lack of retail expertise while also “engaging with…employees” and emphasizing his dedication the Best Buy’s tech customer service “Geek Squad”, which is one of the most important elements of their brand.

Sounds good, but will it work for Joly? More importantly, will it work for Best Buy? Or will it go down as another halfhearted PR stunt?

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