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Posts Tagged ‘Bill Keller’

The New Yorker Editor David Remnick Comments on His Career, the Magazine’s Content and Cover Controversies

New Yorker Cover“While most magazines have their moments in the culture, The New Yorker has mattered a lot at various points in time,” said David Remnick, the magazine’s editor. New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute hosted a wide-ranging conversation with him on Tuesday evening.

Remnick shared his candid thoughts on his career, his editorial role, the magazine’s print and digital content and occasional controversies. While being The New Yorker editor is a once-in-a-blue-moon opportunity, many takeaways from Remnick’s experiences about career timing, managing work relationships, having strong competitors and staying relevant apply across positions.

Below are selected highlights.

Early career: “There were things back then called paid internships”, Remnick emphasized, (in his only reference to the ongoing Conde Nast internship controversy). He got an internship at Newsday, and another at The Washington Post. He also taught English in Japan and served as WaPo’s foreign correspondent in Moscow, competing for stories with Bill Keller of The New York Times.

He attributes his eventual switch from newspapers to magazines to the waiting room at his father’s dental practice. He spent time there reading magazines while listening to rock music. “The New Yorker was hard to grasp beyond the cartoons when I was little, but I warmed to it.”

Being named editor : After Tina Brown left, Remnick, who had been working at The New Yorker, became editor. He said he got the job, even though he had no prior professional editorial experience, after Sy Newhouse’s initial choice was nixed. As Remnick recalled, “they really needed an editor in a hurry. But the geometry of my relationships with other editors changed, and that’s still complicated.”

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Mediabistro Course

Presentation Writing: Design and Delivery

Presentation Writing: Design and DeliveryLearn how to use storytelling techniques and visual content to create and deliver successful pitches and presentations! Starting August 6, Amanda Pacitti, the manager of learning at Time Inc., will teach you the best practices for presentations, from using software like Prezi and Powerpoint, to writing your script, and using images, audio, and video to drive your points. Register now! 

Revolving Door: Leadership Changes at the ‘NY Times,’ and More

Left to right: Baquet, Abramson, Keller. Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

Jill Abramson has been named the executive editor of The New York Times, with Bill Keller stepping down to take on a full-time writing position. Abramson was the paper’s managing editor, and served as an investigative reporter with the paper and as Washington bureau chief. She is the paper’s first-ever female executive editor. Keller held the position for eight years and currently writes a column for the Sunday Times Magazine.

Dean Baquet, the current Washington bureau chief is being moved to the managing editor position.

As the announcement was made, some reporters were tweeting the news, sparking some debate about how and when NYT reporters should use social media.

More Revolving Door after the jump.

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Publicist Asks Bill Keller About the ‘Circuitous’ Nature ‘NYT’ Ledes

Last night, I went to a New York Press Club event featuring a Q&A moderated by NPR’s Brooke Gladstone and featuring The New York Times’ executive editor Bill Keller. It was a pretty good event filled with interesting tidbits of info (which I highlight with Chris O’Shea at FishbowlNY), lengthy questions from the audience, and pieces of unidentifiable meat on the refreshment table.

Since publicists also do a lot of writing, it was fitting that a publicist (and NY Press Club member) asked Keller if there was some sort of policy about writing long, “circuitous” ledes.

“I don’t know how many times I’ve urged reporters and editors to get to the goddamn point,” said Keller. Same could be said for pitches and press releases.

The New York Times Announces It Will Begin To Charge Online Readers in 2011

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After months of speculation, it’s official: The New York Times has announced plans to charge readers for access to its website.

Chairman and publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr., president and chief executive Janet L. Robinson, senior vice president for digital operations Martin A. Nisenholtz and executive editor Bill Keller all went on the record with the TimesRichard Perez-Pena for his story on the decision.

From the press release:

The new approach, referred to as the metered model, will offer users free access to a set number of articles per month and then charge users once they exceed that number. This will enable NYTimes.com to create a second revenue stream and preserve its robust advertising business. It will also provide the necessary flexibility to keep an appropriate ratio between free and paid content and stay connected to a search-driven Web.

It seems the Times had a hard time keeping the final decision a secret. New York magazine’s Gabriel Sherman published a story on January 17th that suggested the newspaper was “close to announcing that the paper will begin charging for access to its website.”

Read the full release after the jump.

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New York Times Looks to Cut from Blogs; WSJ Plans NY Edition

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As part of the newspaper’s reduction of 100 newsroom jobs, The New York Times is examining its 70+ blogs and looking for verticals where they can do some “pruning.”

“If we find instances where a blog or a vertical is consuming considerable effort and expense with little reward, we’re prepared to do some pruning,” executive editor Bill Keller [pictured] told newsroom employees recently.

Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal is planning a separate New York edition, with a $15 million budget. “The Journal is creating a section that will cover local politics, culture, news and sports. For the time being, the section’s launch is set for April. It is expected to run six days a week,” reports The Observer.

mediabistro Poll: Will Paywalls Save Newspapers?

The issue is coming to a head now as The New York Times‘ public editor reports that executive editor Bill Keller has said that the paper will decide “within weeks” whether to erect a paywall. Some in the journalism business think newspapers won’t be able to survive unless they start charging online readers. Others think it’ll be the beginning of the end, as readers flee to free sources of news — and as advertisers follow them.

What do you think? Together, the mediabistro blogs are going to try to “crowdsource” the answer. The principle of the “wisdom of crowds” says a large group of people can correctly predict the answer to a question like this. So tell us what you think. And then get your colleagues and friends to answer as well. The more people who participate, the more likely we’ll get the right answer.

Do You Think Paywalls Will Save Newspapers?(trends)

Times Prepping To Eliminate 100 Newsroom Positions

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FishbowlNY has the memo to the troops from New York Times executive Editor Bill Keller in which he explains that the company will be eliminating 100 newsroom positions via buyouts and potentially layoffs.

“When we took our 5 percent pay cuts, it was in the hope that this would fend off the need for more staff cuts this year. But I accept that if it’s going to happen, it should be done quickly. We will get through this and move on,” he wrote.