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Posts Tagged ‘Brian Solis’

PR Pros To Facebook: Washington Post Good Choice For CEO Op-Ed

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg made perhaps his most public of statements today regarding recent concerns about the social network’s privacy settings: an op-ed in the Washington Post.

In the op-ed, Zuckerberg said the company “missed the mark,” regarding privacy controls, while adding, “We have heard the feedback. There needs to be a simpler way to control your information. In the coming weeks, we will add privacy controls that are much simpler to use.”

We asked several PR executives what they thought of the op-ed.

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SXSWi in Quotes

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[Gym Class Heroes and Fall Out Boy's Pete Wentz at the Ustream Party. Courtesy Nick McGlynn for mediabistro.com/RandomNightOut.com]

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We’re still digging through our notes from SXSW Interactive and wanted to present some of our favorite quotes from the event:

“Institutions fight to keep problems that serve their solution.” –Clay Shirky, Consultant/Author/Teacher

“Social media scares the sh*t out of everybody, because they’re not sure what to do with it.” –Brian Solis, Author/PR Agency Owner

“We’re like eight years into this experiment.” –Foursquare co-founder Dennis Crowley on the location-based craze.

“PR is not going to fix your customer service department.” –Frank Elasion, Senior Director, Comcast National Customer Service

“Last year was about listening, this year is about action.” –Erin Korogodsky, Senior Account Manager, Scout Labs

“Criticism of the mainstream media is misconstrued.” –Markos Moulitsas, Founder, Daily Kos

“I can’t see a future where CNN is solely the middle man.” –Lila King, Senior Producer for Interactive Storytelling and User Participation at CNN.com

“[Gawker Publisher] Nick Denton won’t keep a guy in Mexico when it’s physically dangerous to be there.” –David Carr, The New York Times

“I’ve had enough of agency life.” –Michael O’Connor Clarke, VP Marketing Communications, Freshbooks

“We have such a value on immediacy.” –Randi Zuckerberg, Marketing Director, Facebook

“I would hope the link economy would reward investigative journalism.” –Pete Cashmore, Founder, Mashable

“The Huffington Post and Google News are siphoning off ad revenue from every newspaper in the world.” –Bob Garfield, NPR Correspondent/Author

“[Online publishers] make money the more often we click. They have an economic incentive to keep us distracted.” –Nicholas Carr, Author

“I’ll be the first to admit to being a bit green as an interviewer, and entirely new to SXSW.” –Umair Haque in his first blog post since his widely criticized interview of Twitter CEO Evan Williams.

“What’s popular isn’t always what’s good.” –Pete Cashmore, Founder, Mashable

“This is the Davos of digital.” –B. Bonin Bough, Director of Digital and Social Media at PepsiCo

“If you think the internet is going to replace cable, you’re crazy.” –Mark Cuban, HDNet

“Hey, is that Ashton Kutcher?” –Everyone at every party

Social Agency Mango! Marketing Launches with Consumer Brand Clients

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Mango! Marketing officially launched this week with Deirdre Breakenridge and Jay Miletsky at the helm as president and CEO respectively, to offer “hybrid” social media PR and marketing strategy with the tagline “fueled by creative juice”.

Breakenridge is the co-author of “Putting the Public Back in Public Relations” with FutureWorks principal Brian Solis, and Miletsky is the author of ten books on including the upcoming “Perspectives on Social Media Marketing” with co-authors Stephanie Agresta and B. Bonin Bough .

Both Breakenridge and Jay, or Jason Miletsky were partners at PFS Marketwyse and were servicing clients together. According to Breakenridge, “after 15 years, we realized that the work we do now in social media and community building was far bigger than PFS, so we created Mango! to give our clients a hybrid approach to their communication programs–traditional media blended with social media channels.”

We’re not sure of Mango! Marketing headcount at this point though we know there are other permanent employees on board. The firm applies their four-part social marketing approach–MEG, The BIG3 (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter), DRIVE, and GO!–for brands such as Kraft, Hershey’s, Emerson, and Michael C. Fina.

Have You Offered To “Drive Traffic” To A Story When Pitching A Reporter?

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We haven’t yet seen a pitch like this cross our inbox, but tech reporter Tom Foremski wonders if PR pitches will begin to include statements such as, “…and we will drive traffic to that story.”

For example, a well known publicist such as Brian Solis can drive more traffic to a story via his blog, Facebook and Twitter than many journalists. For bloggers and other online journalists paid by the page view, this can be an enticing addition to a story pitch.

Of course there are a number of of ethical issues around this, namely:

1) PR people will only promote stories that show their client in a favorable light. Those “promoted” stories could end up on popular news aggregators, thus skewing news. This happens anyway – every reporter should understand that PR will circulate “positive” stories – but it could be magnified moving forward.

2) The bigger issue, as Foremski notes, is “When pageviews are a surrogate for payments, driving traffic then becomes a proxy for a payment to the writer.”

Breaking news and “scoops” will always trump a little “PR boost” in terms of getting attention, but we’re still curious as to the effects of this. Have you offered to “drive traffic” to a story you pitched? How did the reporter react?

2010 CES Trends From Edelman, Hill & Knowlton and Brian Solis

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The grand-daddy of all trade-shows, the Consumer Electronics Show, officially gets underway in Las Vegas tomorrow, although there is already much buzz coming out of the pre-show events. PRNewser spoke with several PR executives on the ground to get their take on this year’s trends.

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PR Takeaways From The Google Nexus One Launch

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In the biggest product launch of this short year, Google yesterday afternoon launched their first ever smart phone, the Nexus One. So how did the launch go?

The reviews

Walt Mossberg of the The Wall Street Journal was mostly positive. The New York TimesDavid Pogue was more negative. “Google Phone Is Not Revolutionary,” read his headline. Engadget’s Joshua Toplosky said the launch generated, “legitimate excitement.” CNET’s Rafe Needleman said, “it’s a solid step in Google’s continuing assault on new markets in general and on Apple in particular, but it’s not revolutionary the way the iPhone was…”

“It’s like the Obama of phones. Whether or not he’s really a great president, he can’t possibly live up to expectations he originally set,” said David Berkowitz, Senior Director of Emerging Media & Innovation at agency 360i.

Why No Video?

Flatiron Communications founder Peter Himler wondered why “Google’s PR peeps didn’t go through the trouble of web-streaming their own news conference, while arranging for on-site attendees to record wirelessly, to ensure optimal site lines and audio.” Instead thousands watched a stream set up by blogger Robert Scoble.

“They did the video feed for arguably less meaningful launches like Google Wave,” said Berkowitz.

Courting “influencers”

The list of people receiving Google’s phone in advance wasn’t at all limited to journalists. For example, venture capitalist Fred Wilson received the phone several weeks ago.

Google PR guaranteed feels more “comfortable” giving the phone to Wilson than say Engadget or the Times, as his review is much more likely to be positive. It was.

Wilson does not regularly review tech products and receiving such a high profile gadget in advance surely leads to excitement that could perhaps skew a review. Also, as a tech investor and not a journalist, he is less likely to be critical of the product.

The relatively new concept of “influencers” – some hate the term – means more and more people from different professions getting “pitched” by PR firms than ever before. Even PR people with popular blogs, like Edelman’s Steve Rubel or FutureWork’s Brian Solis get pitched. Robert Scoble, who was invited to the press conference, is a paid adviser to hosting company Rackspace.

Apple crowding

Per usual, Apple made it’s best attempts to crowd the news-cycle as we reported. “I think Apple got themselves in to the news with the tablet, and while iPhone would have been in the articles, it got Apple top of mind as usual,” said POP! PR Jots blogger and tech PR executive Jeremy Pepper. Edelman’s Steve Rubel saw things more positively. “Google plus phone is a surefire for press coverage as Godzilla plus city,” he told us.

Who Owns Social Media? It Depends

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The question has been popping up with increased frequency over the last year: who “owns” social media? Adweek‘s Brian Morrissey talks to a number of agencies in a story today, yet the answer still seems to be: it depends. It depends on the client, their needs, the agency’s capabilities, and a whole lot more.

We’ve asked the question in numerous interviews, and each time received a different answer. We particularly enjoyed FutureWorks Principal Brian Solis‘ answer. In a recent interview with PRNewser, he said, “The reality is that every single department which has an outward facing focus is going to have to socialize: PR, marketing, sales, etc. All of these things are going to need assistance, help and direction. And once it starts to proliferate it will look like this – who will own email within a company? No one, but IT was responsible for implementing email.” High level? Yes, but it makes sense.

In Morrissey’s story, he speaks mostly with agencies that have more of an advertising or online marketing background and are branching out into social media engagement and being named social media agency of record for large brands. In his search for a social media help, Ken Stellmacher, director of consumer marketing at eye-care insurance company VSP said, “We found that different suppliers brought different things to the table, but there wasn’t one agency or partner that satisfied all our needs.”

What is clear: brands are more and more interested in “earned” media as it is more effective in social channels than “paid” media such as banner ads. Given that, agencies that have roots in advertising are increasingly going up against PR firms. Is this PR’s game to lose?

Interview: Brian Solis, FutureWorks Principal, Blogger, Author

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The last time we interviewed Brian Solis, PRNewser was a recently launched blog, still in “beta” on WordPress. Oh, how we’ve both grown since then!

We caught up with Solis – Principal of tech agency FutureWorks, prominent blogger and author – again this week to discuss his new book with Deirdre Breakenridge, “Putting the Public Back in Public Relations” (“What the book is hopefully empowering you to do is go out and recognize what your landscape looks like.”), why all the talk of a “turf war” over social media is misleading (“We assume that one organization is going to own social media and therefore we jockey for ownership of it within the company.”) and his take on sponsored Tweets and blog posts (“If these celebrities are getting $1,000 a tweet to talk about ‘True Blood,’ more power to them.”)

In the summary of the new book you say, “PR, as we know it, is a dying practice having evolved away from the public and instead concentrating its energy on broadcasting messages to audiences through intermediaries such as media and bloggers.” Can you give us some examples of how you are or would help companies “go direct” to the public?

I am on a big anti-case study crusade in the new media landscape. I think it is confusing and polluting what they [case studies] do.

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Interview: Stephanie Agresta, EVP, Global Director of Digital Strategy and Social Media, Porter Novelli

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Stephanie Agresta joined Porter Novelli this past June, after more than 15 years in online marketing with brands including Microsoft, PepsiCo, iVillage, Barnes & Noble, Register.com and SpaFinder.

In addition to running her own consulting business, Agresta is known to many for hosting “The Techset” social media parties with PR 2.0 blogger Brian Solis. This is Agresta’s first agency gig, so we spoke with her about her first 90 days on the job (“It’s been extremely busy and very reflective for me of what’s happening in the industry.”), how her consulting work fits in with Porter Novelli (“…my work and all of my time is spent on Porter efforts.”) and her take on what should be handled by an agency and what should be handled internally when it comes to social media (“It really depends on what point in the process the brand is at.”)

You joined Porter Novelli in June as EVP and Global Director of Digital Strategy and Social Media. How have the first 90 days been?

The first 90 days have been very exciting.

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Porter Novelli Names Stephanie Agresta EVP and Global Director of Digital Strategy and Social Media

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[Agresta with Mahalo.com CEO Jason Calacanis]

Last time we saw tech/media scenester Steph Agresta, she was shouting in an attempt to have her voice heard over the large crowd at one of her and PR 2.0 blogger Brian Solis‘ popular “TechSet” networking events.

Now, Stephanie has a new gig: EVP and Global Director of Digital Strategy and Social Media for Porter Novelli. Announced via Twitter (of course!) Agresta followed up with a lengthy blog post explaining the move:

Yes, large companies bring security and money. Honestly though, talented and experienced independents that know how to execute (and sell) do very well in this business. I could have easily continued working for myself and had a very lush life. This choice is about the opportunity and the team. I’m ready to take on bigger challenges and play in a global pond.

According to Agresta, her consulting business, and TechSet will continue. “I’d like to think of myself now as ‘Powered by Porter Novelli,’ she said. Porter Novelli clients include Procter & Gamble, HP, Reebok and Aflac.

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