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Posts Tagged ‘Brian Stelter’

Media Beat: Brian Stelter’s Choice, Work in TV News or Cover It

How did an 18-year-old college student in Maryland gain the trust of and get access to TV executives and anchors in New York? “By posting 10 or 15 posts a day meant that the industry knew it was a reliable consistent source,” says Brian Stelter, creator of our sister site TVNewser and now a media reporter for the New York Times and author of the just released book “Top of the Morning.”

As he neared graduation, Stelter had to make a choice: work in TV news, or cover it.

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Media Beat: Brian Stelter on Being Matt Lauer’s Nemesis

Brian Stelter, who launched TVNewser almost 10 years ago, is now a published author. “Top of the Morning,” out today, lays bare a tumultuous year for network morning news shows which saw one anchor pack her bags, another face a serious health issue, a ratings leader fall — and lose a quarter of its audience — and an entirely new show launch.

In his first interview for the book, Stelter tells us about the secrecy behind “Top of the Morning,” the access he got, and what he thinks about being called Matt Lauer‘s nemesis.

  • Part II, tomorrow: What happens when Brian Stelter Tweets something he shouldn’t?

For more videos, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

How to Use Facebook’s Graph Search as a PR Tool

Photo courtesy of AP/Jeff ChiuA while ago we posted on how Facebook‘s newfangled “graph search” setup could help PR pros and marketers more effectively push their clients’ content to the general public and conduct market research. But here’s something we never thought about: what if graph search could double as a media contact database?

We recently spoke to Peter Axtman of Sunshine Sachs to learn how he used graph search to score a big PR win for a client with a very specific target audience.

Axtman was working to promote a client called Playground Sessions, an instructional app-maker that is “like Rosetta Stone for piano”. Axtman told us that, though the client had received some “mainstream tech coverage“, he “wanted to talk to niche piano publications” that might appeal more explicitly to the client’s target audience — people interested in learning to play piano or improve their form without in-person training.

So he turned to graph search with surprising (and encouraging) results.

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‘NYT’s David Carr at Internet Week: ‘Now It’s A Better Age Between Journalists and PR’

It was Page One on day two of Internet Week as visitors got an inside look from New York Times’ top media reporters.

Last year’s Page One documentary profiled The New York Times media desk, and today two of its best-known reporters, David Carr (left) and Brian Stelter (below), appeared on stage at Internet Week. They not only chronicled what it’s like to work at the “paper of record,” but also commented on the paywall, social media platforms, their relationship with PR professionals, and with each other. Below are highlights.

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Mashable Officially Launches Follow

Cashmore speaking to the crowd at last night's event.

Last night at Edelman’s New York offices, Mashable officially launched Mashable Follow, the site’s “new social layer” that will enable readers to find and follow their favorite topics, share stories to multiple social networks at once and follow other Mashable readers who are of interest, among other features.

Mashable founder Pete Cashmore addressed the crowd in attendance, and noted that the service had already added “thousands of sign ups” within the first few hours of launching.

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Nevada Senate Candidate Invites Media to Press Conference; Ignores Them

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Local media are scratching their heads after Nevada U.S. Senate candidate Sharron Angle invited them to a press conference, but refused to even acknowledge their presence when they tried to ask her questions after the event ended.

Angle, who is looking to defeat Senator Harry Reid, the majority leader, has been avoiding the media for weeks. The New York TimesBrian Stelter traveled to Nevada several weeks ago to dig deeper into the story.

“I can’t remember a time that we’ve ever had trouble with interviews,” Mary Beth Farrell, the news director at KRNV, the local NBC affiliate told Stelter. “Especially with people running for office – they usually beat our door down.”

Angle has granted several interviews to what some may call media outlets who could be more sympathetic to her campaign, however, the frequency in which she gives interviews or answers any questions from the media is well below what is considered normal for a Senate candidate.

Some have asked if Angle’s tactic of avoiding the media, or controlling her interviews to a few outlets and delivering messaging via social media channels can work. What do you think?

Orbit Gum Taps Jason Bateman and Will Arnett for Branded Comedy

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PRNewser attended the launch party for DumbDumb last night, a production company from actors Will Arnett and Jason Bateman. The company is part of Electus, the IAC-supported company run by former NBC entertainment chief Ben Silverman.

The party was to celebrate the company’s first digital short, sponsored by Orbit Gum.

At the event, agency Sunshine & Sachs, which represents DumbDumb, Electus and IAC, was busy working their magic, along with IAC PR executives Stacy Simpson and Leslie Cafferty.

Agency partners Ken Sunshine and Shawn Sachs even showed up to mingle among the celeb-heavy crowd, which included Arnett’s wife and “Parks and Recreation” star Amy Poehler, actress Amanda Peet, actor Justin Long, “Inside the Actors Studio” host James Lipton, Actress Renee Zellweger, actress Kristin Bell, Comedian Chuck Nice and “30 Rock’s” Katrina Bowden.

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Press clips featuring DumbDumb and Electus rotated throughout the night on IAC’s large video screens, highlighting recent PR efforts.

For yesterday’s launch, Arnett and Bateman gave a few pre-event interviews to media, including The New York TimesBrian Stelter. At the party, they stayed late, making the rounds with attendees and their sponsor.

“Will and I were happy when given the opportunity to partner with Orbit gum and we’re enjoying the challenge of taking the brand to the next level with this type of integrated branded content,” said Bateman in a release today.

Orbit’s ad agency, Energy BBDO (Chicago) “provided creative insight into the campaign development.”

Our colleague Alex Weprin was in attendance as well and has video of the digital short over at WebNewser.

RELATED: The Ten Myths of Creating Web Content

The FCC’s Embedded Journalist Is Really a Spokesman

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On Monday night the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) senior advisor to the chairman Steve Waldman tried out the agency’s “Reboot” message on a tough crowd: regulation averse digerati from Silicon Alley. The small group of entrepreneurs and very vocal journalist/bloggers including CUNY prof and BuzzMachine blogger Jeff Jarvis and Wired’s Spencer Reiss got together at the offices of PR firm Morris + King to hash out what Waldman is supposed to be doing.

Waldman, founder of BeliefNet (a longtime M+K client) and former Newsweek journalist, was tapped by his old friend, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski to deliver a non-binding “Future of the Media” report by the end of this year. Genachowski brought in Waldman last Fall to sift through everything related to the state of news media today–existing research from places like Pew and Poynter Institutes, policies and pending initiatives such as the stance on Net Neutrality and the possible relaxation of cross-ownership rules between media companies.

“It’s an exercise in restraint. I can’t always mouth off with my point of view,” said Waldman. His job isn’t to figure out how to save the mainstream media from itself or fix business models, but to understand the various forces that pose a threat to the essential role of the news in holding commercial interests accountable.

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White House’s Anita Dunn on CNN: We Will Push Back

White House Director of Communications Anita Dunn took to Howie Kurtz’s Reliable Sources show on CNN this morning to elaborate on the new, more aggressive press strategy laid out by TIME magazine this week.

“The reality of it is that Fox News often operates almost as either the research arm or the communications arm of the Republican Party,” Dunn said.

Dunn confirmed this was the reason Obama didn’t not include Fox in his Sunday media blitz a few weeks ago.

The nine minute interview looked at difference between Fox’s opinion shows, and its news coverage. Kurtz read, and Dunn responded to the statement to that affect, issued by Fox’s SVP of News Michael Clemente on Friday.

The administration is fine with Fox White House Correspondent Major Garrett but not with the network’s use of talking points, opposition research, and misleading chyrons.

Dunn also gave Kurtz homework to do on what Fox is not covering: “Did you see coverage of that (the Senator Ensign scandal) on Fox News? I’m not talking Glenn Beck, Sean, the Factor, I’m talking Fox News.” “I will have to check on that,” Kurtz responded.

UPDATE: Fox News SVP Michael Clemente issued the following response: “An increasing number of viewers are relying on FOX News for both news and opinion. And the average news consumer can certainly distinguish between the A-section of the newspaper and the editorial page, which is what our programming represents. So, with all due respect to anyone who might still be confused about the difference between news reporting and vibrant opinion, my suggestion would be to talk about the stories and the facts, rather than attack the messenger…which over time, has never worked.”

MORE: The NYTimes’ Brian Stelter has more on the White House – Fox News “volley.”

Talking New Media Reporting at Publicity Club Of New York Luncheon

There are no “deadlines.” Twitter is our number one source for getting news. We’re all kind of working 24-hours a day. Those were just some of the statements made at the Publicity Club of New York’s “New” Media Beat luncheon today.

Featuring David Kaplan of PaidContent, Nicholas Carlson of The Business Insider, Mediaite’s Rachel Sklar, The Huffington Post’s Danny Shea and The New York TimesBrian Stelter, the panel dug into what “reporting” means and how it has completely changed in the digital, social world.

PRNewser attended and live-tweeted the event. You can checkout the complete stream here and our updates here. After the event, we caught up with Huffington Post Media Editor Danny Shea for a brief video interview in which he described how he uses social media for sourcing stories, what some of the best PR pros do to get his attention and if PR is doing a good job of communicating in the real time, 24/7 news environment.

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