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Posts Tagged ‘Britney Spears’

It’s Hard to Tell Whether Britney Spears’ Vegas Show is Good or Bad for Her Career

brit brit vegasBritney Spears’ Las Vegas stint “Piece of Me” at the Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino (50 shows in 2014 and 2015) debuted on Friday. And while it’s great that she’s back on stage, the AP starts by calling the gig her “early retirement.” Eek!

The usual Vegas audience for these sorts of shows (typically headlined by artists like Celine Dion) is older than the average Brit Brit fan. And even she’s getting a little older (32… gasp!), with the Associated Press pointing out the nostalgia in the show with “several callbacks to the 1990s and early 2000s, including plaid shirts tied around dancers’ waists and a recap of the skin-tight sparkling bodysuit Spears wore in the ‘Toxic’ music video.” Her songs really speak to a moment in time. There’s only so much audience for that kind of entertainment.

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Britney Spears: Oops! She Did Racism Again

britney-spearsBritney Spears is no stranger to the gone-damn-near-stupid category. However, she is coming strong with her damn-near-racist category leanings.

At first, “Brit Brit” (as all the not-so-cool kids call her), was simply promoting her eighth CD Britney Jean because Michael Jackson isn’t around to complain about copyright infringement.

She spoke with gay magazine Pride Source thinking she was hitting her core demographic. Should be easy, right? Only, she told Chris Azzopardi something that hit her demographic smack in the mouth:

“I get inspiration from [my gay fans] on almost all of my songs,” Spears says of her gay fans. “They’re somewhat girls, so it’s so inspiring to do stuff that they like to hear, like the cool ‘in’ stuff. Whatever I do for each record is definitely inspired by them.”

“Somewhat girls?” Yeah, that’s nice. But when she says things like this, we feel like someone needs to send her Mickey Mouse behind to sensitivity training.

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Taylor Swift’s Next PR Move (Why Can’t We Let Teen Stars Grow Up?)

We know it’s hard to let go. The public loves its pop stars.

We, the public, feel that entertainers like Taylor Swift belong to us, to our families and to our Rockwellian image of what a young American woman should be: smart, pretty and forever 17. Sure, it’s unfair, but we don’t care; “the public” does not subject itself to petty concerns like ethical consistency. We’d never criticize our own daughters or nieces for growing up, but Taylor Swift? How could she?

Swift doesn’t just boast legions of young fans who idolize her; she also attracts a large adult demographic more interested in glorifying youth itself. To disillusioned grown-ups, being young like Swift means being unbridled, healthy, passionate, and open to everything that a bright new world can offer. The reality of being young, of course, is different–while it may at times prove sublime, the act of becoming an adult remains fraught with disappointment, divorce, bulimia, bullying and acne (the horror!).

Swift, now 22, just released “Red,” her fourth album. It is, of course, a departure from her previous albums, the first of which reached our impressionable ears just six years ago. But will we accept it? In a fascinating application of herd mentality, young and talented female artists like Swift often encounter a public backlash when they move into adulthood.  The public feels–despite all logic–that the artist they learned to love as a precocious teen has somehow betrayed them by becoming an adult. Read more

Are Clients Getting More Demanding With Media Outlets?

Photo: Kevin Mazur/WireImage.com

A couple of weeks ago, we said that making outsized requests to reporters about the stories they’re working on is a bad idea after a film company’s grumble about the tone of a Moviefone story turned into an AOL dustup. After reading a few recent stories, it looks like big demands are becoming more common.

During his mea culpa for pitching a fit at the GMA studios, Chris Brown said that it’s normal for he and his team to submit talking points to a potential interviewer. If the interviewer doesn’t agree with the talking points, Brown will take a pass. (In that case, GMA said it received no talking points.)

This week, demands from both Sarah Palin and Britney Spears have turned into stories. Do we smell a trend?

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Obama Beats iPad (On Twitter)

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As PRNewser readers surely know, two major news events occurred yesterday: the launch event for Apple’s iPad tablet computer and President Barack Obama‘s State of the Union address.

On at least one medium — Twitter — Obama had more hype than the iPad. The State of the Union peaked at 9,000 tweets per minute, while the iPad Launch peaked at 7,000 tweets per minute, according to Retrevo’s Tech Buzzmeter.

The consumer electronics review and shopping site used the same data gathering it uses to report on real time consumer electronics trends and applied it to Twitter and real time news.

To compare, topics such as ‘Britney Spears‘ get about 10-20 Tweets per minute on a sustained basis.