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Posts Tagged ‘Budweiser’

Will the Public Belly Up to Sam Adams in a Can?

Believe it or not, there was a day in America when “fancy pants” beer meant Heineken. An import from Holland, Heineken was like the truffles of beer and changed the complexion of your Dad’s garage refrigerator from the red, white and blue of Budweiser and gold of Coors to an electric green.

But then Sam Adams, using a recipe developed in 1860, came along and changed everything in the mid-90′s, starting a microbrew craze that continues to sweep across America and spurring the craft beer obsession that has altered the landscape and language of our beer culture. Cask ale, anyone? Only $14 per bottle!

The American public has always had an intriguing relationship with beer. Even as U.S. beer drinkers and the beverage they love have grown more sophisticated and worldly, our society stubbornly refuses to let beer become the domain of the 1%.

Some examples: Miller High Life implemented a hilarious ad campaign featuring a delivery guy who lambasted pretentious beer drinkers. And hipsters managed to pull off one of the great ironic miracles of our time by making Pabst Blue Ribbon cool again (OK, the recession probably helped too).

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4 Super Bowl ‘Rebranding’ Reviews: What Worked? What Didn’t?

Since today is officially Review the Super Bowl day, we thought we’d riff on a theme we saw in several of last night’s big-name ads: rebranding. The companies in question aren’t exactly hurting for money (except for one very notable exception), but they wanted to use the Super Bowl as a jumping-off point to refine and re-target their brands. So what worked? What didn’t? Let’s do some before-and-after comparisons, shall we?

Mercedes-Benz

Before: A luxury car brand synonymous with “incredibly rich (and usually evil) people”

After: A premium brand that’s still affordable for those of us a little lower on the social ladder

Did it work? Nice commercial but no. An “economy” model Mercedes is like a subprime mortgage: you can tell us it’s less expensive and convince us that we’ll be able to pay it off in twenty years of installments, but the fact is we still can’t afford it.

But hey, at least we didn’t have to watch Kate Upton try to act.

Click through for the rest:

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Top 10 Social Media Moments of Super Bowl XLVII

You’ve heard the news: Super Bowl 47 was all about social. While the TV ratings for last night’s game were higher than the year before, the audience’s social activity/engagement numbers more than doubled. The “Brand Bowl” confirmed something we already knew: social now plays a bigger role in the marketing/advertising/PR equation than ever before–and its influence will surely continue to grow.

Need evidence? Here are our 10 favorite social media moments from last night’s big game.

1. Oreo’s on-the-fly branding spot: Is it obvious? Yes. But there’s a reason people are still flipping out over Oreo and 360i‘s incredible acts of branding.

2. Budweiser‘s “Name that Clydesdale” campaign: This one was a slow burn strategy win. Bud was very wise to start the hype early by leaking videos and encouraging fans to get involved.

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DOJ Wants to Keep Your Beer Affordable (And Budweiser Clydesdales Make Us Cry)

Beer drinkers of America: the Department of Justice has your back.

The DOJ filed a civil antitrust lawsuit this week to stop Anheuser-Busch InBev‘s $20.1 billion deal to buy the remaining shares of Grupo Modelo, brewers of Corona, saying that merging the largest and third largest beer makers would “substantially lessen competition”. In other words, if this deal went through there would be nothing to keep the cost of your Friday night suds from skyrocketing.

Under the proposed merger, ABI and Modelo would together control about 46 percent of beer sales in the US. Bill Baer, assistant attorney general in charge of DOJ’s antitrust division, said “If ABI fully owned and controlled Modelo, ABI would be able to increase beer prices to American consumers. This lawsuit seeks to prevent ABI from eliminating Modelo as an important competitive force in the beer industry.”

In order to prove ABI’s dubious intentions, the DOJ’s complaint quotes internal company documents that highlight ABI’s plans to maintain its upward price leadership.

But Anheuser-Busch, like so many boozed-up brawlers before it, won’t be going down without a fight. The company said that it plans to “vigorously contest the DOJ’s action in federal court”. Oddly, whoever wrote the release forgot to add “despite the fact that everyone in the world knows that both Budweiser and Corona taste like overpriced, alcohol-flavored water.”

We’ll keep you posted as this story progresses. In the meantime, though, we’ve uncovered Anheuser-Busch’s nefarious plans to interrupt your Super Bowl with this tear-jerker of a commercial (as if trying to raise the price of your beer weren’t bad enough). We may or may not have begun our Friday morning watching this clip, singing along, and blubbering into our housecoats. Dammit, Clydesdales – you get us every time.

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Budweiser to Launch New ‘Millennial’ Beers During Super Bowl

Beck's SapphireAs the Super Bowl approaches, so too does the PR analysis of brands that have chosen to invest many millions into advertising during this unique American spectacle.

All-American beer brand Budweiser (which is owned by Belgians now, BTW) considers the Super Bowl home field. Football and alcohol have long held an uneasy relationship that translates well on television screens but less so in the parking lot after NFL games.

So it’s not surprising–particularly in an environment where microbrews, casks ales and other niche beers are driving consumer climate change–that Anheuser-Busch InBev is once again using the Super Bowl as a platform to promote its new, more sophisticated brands of beer (namely Budweiser Black Crown and Beck’s Sapphire).

The goal, of course, is to reach younger drinkers—yes, Millennials—who don’t have a loyalty to regular Budweiser or an emotional connection the brand’s famed Clydesdales. The target audience, as this article describes them (and oh we love this), is the type of people drawn to “nighttime drinking occasions”. Sorry NASCAR fans, lunchtime strip club goers, and that one drunk uncle we all have. These beers are not for you.

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Budweiser Miffed Over Flight Product Placement

And now we bring you a very, very welcome respite from politics. Yes, it felt great to type that.

In the eyes of the average brand, product placement is a good thing–especially when the product in question plays a role in a hit feature film. But representatives for worldwide King of Suds Anheuser-Busch aren’t too happy with the fact that a bottle clearly bearing the Budweiser logo appears in the new Denzel Washington thriller Flight.

Why would any brand demand to have its logo removed from a critically acclaimed movie starring one of the industry’s biggest names? It’s fairly simple, really: his character has a drinking problem.

That’s right, Denzel stars as a commercial airline pilot who works an evening shift as a hopeless alcoholic–and that fact turns into a big problem after he survives a “horrific crash” for which we can only assume he bears responsibility (no spoilers please–we’re waiting for the DVD).

Turns out that DVD may well be missing a certain dark-brown bottle with an iconic red logo. This week, Anheuser-Busch asked Paramount and its parent company, Viacom, to remove all traces of the offending Bud from subsequent cuts of Flight. The company’s vice president issued a statement: “We would never condone the misuse of our products, and have a long history of promoting responsible drinking…It is disappointing that Image Movers, the production company, and Paramount chose to use one of our brands in this manner.”

Really?

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Brewers to Obama: Where’s the Beer Certificate?

You’ve heard that The White House runs America’s greatest unsung craft beer brewery, right? But did you know that it’s mobile? That’s right, it fits on the campaign bus. Good times!

Well, some jealous ninnies just can’t deal with the President concealing what should obviously be the intellectual property of the American people—they’re demanding that the White House release the recipe for this executive brew, and they’re doing it via online petition! It’s democracy 2.0 at work!

Created in 2011, White House Honey Ale (sounds a little light to us) was the first beer brewed at the request of our current President, who purchased the kit with his own money after embarrassing himself by drinking a Bud Light at the infamous beer summit for some unknown reason that we choose to find offensive.

By the way, Obama isn’t the first significant American to brew at home: Read more

Spin the Agencies of Record

The stars have certainly aligned for Steve Stoute’s agency, Translation: Hip-hop juggernaut Jay-Z, film legend Ron Howard and iconic American beer brand Budweiser, along with a host of other talents, marketing gurus, PR experts and businesspeople are joining forces to create a film based on the two-day “Budweiser Made in America” film festival to be held in Philadelphia, PA, in September.

Sovereign\Santander has chosen Arnold Worldwide to represent the bank’s rebranding in a review competition that included Mullen and SapientNitro. Santander, the Spanish brand that bought Sovereign—and its 722 branches—in 2009, hired Arnold Worldwide to position the brand and execute its sweeping marketing and advertising efforts.

The Marcus Graham Project, an intensive summertime program designed to help rectify the ad industry’s lack of diversity, is celebrating its fifth anniversary by announcing that the project is going full time. This evolution, named Locomotus, will require $2.6 million in its first year.

Co-founder Lincoln Stephens emphasized the investment will benefit the industry as it seeks to remain competitive in a globalized and diversified marketplace and bolster the careers of motivated, talented, young professionals. Dan Wieden, MGP supporter and co-founder/global executive creative director of Wieden & Kennedy, explains “Locomotus takes the best of what portfolio programs and student-run agencies have and moves it to the next level.”

Stalwart anti-spyware brand McAfee, recently bought by Intel, has chosen Daniel J. Edelman’s Zeno Group as its AOR. This marks an account boon for Zeno, which is expanding its tech portfolio in its Silicon Valley office. Zeno will presumably be promoting McAfee’s digital products which give users the option of customizing their security settings.

Moet & Chandon USA has chosen Miami-based BRPR to head its digital strategies, sponsorship integration and brand communication across all platforms in the USA.

Budweiser Not Responsible for ‘The Hangover’ in Part II

Product placement everywhere you turn. Except for that one scene in The Hangover Part II where Bradley Cooper said Budweiser but they didn’t actually flash the beer logo all over the screen. Missed opportunity?

Not if you ask Budweiser. Unlike other companies, they actually said no the movie because the scene wasn’t in line with their marketing.

“The brother-in-law in that scene was underage,” Anheuser-Busch’s director of marcomms Mike Bulthaus told the Vulture blog. “We invest a lot of money in our efforts to combat underage drinking. It’s an issue we take seriously.”

Well well. Companies that were featured include IHOP, which was in a scene where someone yells out the naughty C-word.

Product placement has gotten so ubiquitous Morgan Spurlock made a movie about it and the next James Bond movie has $45 million worth of it.

America’s Beer of Choice Is…

Sam Adams! Bud and Bud Light take the numbers two and three spots.

The folks at YouGov BrandIndex crunched the numbers to determine the number one beer choice across the country and in three major cities. With the exception of Chicago, which prefers Heineken (and doesn’t like America or St. Patrick’s Day), Sam Adams was tops with taste buds in the U.S.

For this research, YouGov took a look at scores from the past four weeks. These scores are based on the perceptions of U.S. adults of drinking age. Each day, YouGov interviews 5,000 people for their thoughts on a variety of topics.

The company also looked at spirit preferences. Check it out after the jump.

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