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This guest post comes to you courtesy of Caitlin Epstein, senior associate at Eastwick.

Stalkers. Hagglers. Pests. As a public relations professional who is paid to understand public perception, I’m well aware of the reputation of our profession.

The age-old rivalry between journalists and PR is one we hear about often, whether it’s through a dreaded “PR pet peeve” article, tweets from reporters or even inquiries from clients. I, however, find the rivalry a bit petty and feel that the public misses out on part of the story—a big part of the story. Regardless of arguments to the contrary, reporters rely on PR people and most are not afraid to admit it. Our profession was created to facilitate the rapport between companies and media, and the majority of the time, we do just that.

There are times when we screw up, of course: you may have seen the recent New York Times article criticizing a PR agency for its poor handling of a client’s announcement, and DigiDay also recently published a list of PR habits that drive reporters nuts. Every time one of these articles goes viral, the Eastwick office is abuzz with conversation on the nuances of PR. At this point, we have a pretty good idea of what to avoid in order to keep the peace. However, I’m always left wondering what the other side of the equation is—how and when does PR help reporters?

That question in mind, we decided to reach out to some of the journalists we’ve worked with over the years to hear their tips, tricks and examples of how PR can serve as a resource instead of a pain.

Here are some of our favorites:

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