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Posts Tagged ‘Capital New York’

The New Yorker PR Director Leaves for Facebook

AlexaCOn Friday Capital New York reported that Alexa Cassanos, a communications veteran who has spent nearly seven years at The New Yorker and currently serves as the publication’s senior director of PR, will leave next month for a spot on the Facebook roster.

Cassanos has an extensive history in PR at some of the biggest names in New York City’s print publishing world.

After nearly a decade at Random House, she held top positions at both Conde Nast and Bon Appetit before joining The New Yorker in 2007.

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Top New York Times Fashion Critic Resigns

t-logo-190This morning brought big news for everyone in fashion PR: Cathy Horyn will step down as The New York Times‘ chief fashion critic after more than 15 years in the position, effective immediately.

As Capital New York reports, Horyn “occupied one of the fashion industry’s true critical pulpits” but was not always a favorite among the design community due to her propensity for brutal honesty in reviewing designers’ newest collections and personal comments about designers themselves; Giorgio Armani and Yves Saint Laurent famously banned her from their shows.

On a somber note, the given reason for this last-minute announcement is the illness of Horyn’s partner, former Liz Claiborne executive Art Ortenberg.

Notes from the memo just released by Times executive editor Jill Abramson and styles editor Stuart Emmrich after the jump:

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6,329 ‘Credentialed Journalists’ Will Cover Super Bowl XLVIII

shutterstock_173561534

In case you needed further proof that the multi-headed hydra we call “the media” still struggles to define its role in a micro-blog world, today brings two very different reports about the state of the journalistic game.

We’ll start with the bad news: Capital New York‘s soon-to-be-paywalled Media Pro newsletter let us know that, per our headline, more than 6,000 people who report for a living will keep us up-to-date on this year’s edition of what Stephen Colbert calls the “Superb Owl“. Some of them may still be reporting on whether the Big Game will happen at all while the NFL’s media relations team cackles maniacally.

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Should You Pitch to Dr. Oz’s New Women’s Magazine?

shutterstock_144522389Oh hey: a brand-new publication from Hearst will soon hit newsstands, offering “diet, health and fitness tips” to American women!

Wait, why are you yawning? This one involves Dr. Oz!

Capital New York tells us that Dr. Oz The Good Life will include plenty of the doctor’s signature clinical recommendations as well as his “wellness-minded approaches to finance.”

So how will The Good Life differ from pretty much every other magazine out there? The King of TMI himself explains:

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Random House Prepares to Feel the Wrath of Fox News

Roger-Ailes_a_lToday Capital New York describes a “big roll-out” for The Loudest Voice in the RoomNew York magazine scribe Gabriel Sherman‘s forthcoming “tell-all” about Roger Ailes and his Fox News empire; Capital even went so far as to borrow the word “shitstorm” from one Matt Drudge (aka Ailes’ biggest fan) in anticipation of the ensuing smear campaign.

This is, of course, the same book that led Fox to fire its top PR guy Brian Lewis after accusing him of being Sherman’s main source (a claim we always doubted, given the Ailes team’s legendary sense of loyalty). Publisher Random House  expects the same sort of aggressive response to the book, because “conservative media outlets have been attacking Sherman’s reporting for months in an attempt to discredit the author.”

Yet the book’s official site, worth visiting for its Wall Street Journal-style headshot illustrations, calls the tome a “deeply reported journey” inside the network, and we’re left wondering how Ailes will attempt to minimize its influence.

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Mayor de Blasio Loses His Comms Director on Inauguration Day

He needs someone to help him answer this question

Now who’s going to help him answer this question?

In a story we missed over the holiday, The New York Post let the world know the single most important thing about Lis Smith, official spokesperson for new mayor Bill de Blasio‘s campaign and transition team: she’s dating Eliot Spitzer! (And yes, they went with the “Ho! Ho! Ho!” headline. Pure class.)

Given the fact that we don’t know anyone involved in this story, we probably shouldn’t assume that gossip had anything to do with Smith’s decision not to serve in the new administration. But we’ll go ahead and make that assumption anyway.

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Chiara de Blasio and the New Art of Damage Control

Did you miss this fascinating study in pre-emptive damage control last week?

On Christmas Eve, NYC mayor-to-be Bill de Blasio‘s transition team released a candid, one-on-one video in which his daughter Chiara tells of suffering through depression while at college and eventually seeking professional help after self-medicating with alcohol and marijuana.

The clip is a combination PSA/reality TV-style confession produced by the de Blasio family with their own money, and it might raise more questions than it answers.

It’s also a great example of the latest step in the evolution of damage control. We’ll let the elder de Blasio explain in his own words (via Capital New York).

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The Wall Street Journal Editor Says Native Advertising Is a Deal with the Devil

Gerard?

We never pegged The Wall Street Journal managing editor Gerard Baker as a theater major, but he went all Shakespearean on the New York University journalism school crowd last night when he described native advertising as a “Faustian bargain” between brands and publishers.

He’s one of the holdouts who thinks that publications must maintain a strict wall between promotional and editorial, and he believes that the WSJ and the brands that want to use it as a promo forum will both lose out if the paper goes native:

An advertiser wants to advertise in The Wall Street Journal to be seen and to be associated with a brand like The Wall Street Journal, or The Financial Times or Bloomberg, because those news organizations are respected. If [advertisers] manipulate the digital or print operations of those news organizations, it makes the reader confused as to what is news and what is advertising, and the reader’s trust, the very reason that those advertisers want to advertise in those news organizations, goes away.

Valid point. He also thinks that brands will eventually come to their senses and realize that the traditional relationship between publisher and advertiser works just fine.

Baker grudgingly respects some of the work published by big traffic sites like BuzzFeed and Business Insider while insisting that most of the newer players in the business journalism game deal in “rumor, gossip and information gleaned from someone talking to them in a bar” (not that fellow News Corp. properties Fox News and The New York Post would ever do anything like that).

*Hat tip to FishbowlNY for this one and to Capital New York for the original report.

Does a Stylish Men’s Mag Like ‘M’ Have an Audience?

When we try to come up with sure-fire ways to make a big impression in today’s scattershot media world, the very first thought that enters our minds always seems to be “Start an upscale men’s fashion magazine!”

OK, not really—but Condé Nast has decided to take that step by re-launching “M Magazine”, a venture run by former New York Observer editor Peter Kaplan. Its first issue hits newsstands today followed by a big question: will anyone read it?

It didn’t work the first time—the title appeared in 1983 and folded during the early 90’s due to poor ad revenue. Kaplan sees the new quarterly as less of a fashion rag and more of a Euro-style intellectual journal—for American men who make over $200,000 a year. It’s very traditional: As Kaplan puts it, “M” is a “magazine to state the love of print” that runs on the power of ads by luxury titans like Versace, Dunhill and Louis Vuitton.

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