AgencySpy LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook GalleyCat UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Center for Public Broadcasting’

Calm Down, Everybody: Big Bird Will Be Fine

We’ll just go ahead and say it: last night’s debate was a big bore. Mitt Romney did quite well, Jim Lehrer did quite poorly, and a few million people became aware of the current President’s sleepwalking problem for the first time. (It is worth noting that, way back in June, Chuck Todd predicted that Obama would probably not win this first debate because “no one has cut his remarks short during his term in office”.)

The night’s most contentious moment, however, clearly concerned none other than Big Bird. When listing public entities that he would stop funding if elected, Romney took a moment to pick on perennial bogeyman PBS, telling Public Broadcasting employee Lehrer that he would have to cut funding for the channel despite the fact that “I like PBS. I love Big Bird. I actually like you, too.”

The Internet quickly made it a meme, and a predictable number of mildly amusing tweets ensued. So yeah, it was a weird line—but it wasn’t quite accurate. (In case you hadn’t noticed, this is a common problem in presidential debates.)

Unfortunately, we have to ruin everyone’s fun by calling an official end to this non-scandal. Take it away, Sherrie Westin, executive vice president and chief marketing officer of Sesame Workshop–give CNN’s Soledad O’Brien some of that sweet, sweet damage control!

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Applied Web Analytics

Applied Web AnalyticsStarting November 24, learn how to use metrics to drive your business goals! In this course, you'll learn how to set goals and produce results based on data, identify and track the KPIs for your website, and integrate your analytic efforts into your overall marketing strategy. Register now!

Lots of News, Little Substance, FCC Says

When it comes to news, consumers are being offered more choices than ever but little information on important events nearby, according to a new FCC report, “Information Needs of Communities.”

The report, which has been 18 months in the making, outlines how the media has changed dramatically within the last decade. As advertising moves online to Craigslist and other websites, newspapers are closing and cutting staff, which means fewer reporters to write in-depth stories on institutions that really impact people’s daily lives, such as city councils, schools and local developers.

Dramatic? Yes. C-Net declared that the internet helped “suffocate local news.”

Read more