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Posts Tagged ‘changes’

The Top 9 Most Contested AP Style Changes in ‘Hopefully’ Ever

APStyle

Come on. High-Five? Who’s with us?

Thanks to the evolution of text lingo, -isms, and a cornucopia of other logophilic and verbivore-ish drama, the AP Stylebook has become the most coveted book for hacks and flacks alike. It’s like anything Adobe — one second away from the thing and it shoots you another inconvenient update.

I’ve been struggling with this whole Oxford comma thing since I read this study and this report. I had a nightmare last night — woke up screaming, sweated a little, and ran to my computer to make sure the Oxford commas hadn’t been adopted overnight.

While that change has yet to be made — and I still struggle with adopting it — here are 10 other controversial changes from the AP Stylebook that caused a Jonestown-like response. Bottoms up?

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5 Things Wrong with the Press Release

PR ER

Once upon a time, there was a tool called the press release.

It was the largest hammer, longest nail, and strongest muscle all in one. Flacks were able to write commercial-esque documents in hopes of national pick-up. Clients were happy because of their approved (and finely crafted) 18-paragraph quotes. PR agencies were happy because they had a sure-fire journalism story written with fluidity.

Today? No one seems happy.

Releases don’t get that universal attention. Clients don’t get infomercial-length quotes. The Web certainly can’t stand such content, what with Google’s pet Panda traipsing all over free news wires like a scene from Godzilla. So, what happened? After the jump, we take a look…

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Twitter Changes Usage Rules, Internet Freaks Out

Social media leaders Twitter earned a spot in the PR doghouse last week by alienating a key sector of their audience: developers. What did they do? They changed the rules of usage for third-party developers who create and sell apps that work off the Twitter interface–and number well into the thousands.

The move had been expected for some time, but the new rules will almost certainly make it harder for the producers of some very popular apps to continue using Twitter’s API.

We understand that Twitter wants to retain a certain degree of control over their product and everything that falls within its purvey, but as Matthew Ingram writes in Bloomberg Businessweek, many of the third-party creations now restricted by Twitter actually improve the service and help bring more users aboard.

We’re not developers, so we have to ask: Why did Twitter make this move now, and what can they do–short of reversing these rule changes–to earn their way back into the good graces of the entrepreneurial app community?