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Posts Tagged ‘Digiday’

55 Percent of Consumers Don’t See the Point of ‘Friending’ a Brand

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Here’s an interesting one we missed from last week: consumers (especially those in Western countries) don’t really see the benefits of “friending” your client’s brand on social.

The results of a survey performed by WPP agency Geometry Global mostly serve to reinforce what we already know: trade blog listicles aside, people don’t follow brands for witty Twitter commentary. They want free stuff.

Now’s the time to mention the big E word: engagement.

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Public Relations

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‘Secretary of Defense’ Tim Howard on Finding the Right Brand to Sponsor

Apropos of celebrities, here’s a short clip from Experian Marketing Services‘ recent “Storytellers” Client Summit in which the Secretary of Defense Tim Howard explains a bit about what helps him choose a brand to sponsor.

You won’t be surprised to learn that it’s his agent (and his moral compass):

“I don’t want to lend my name to just any old company…at this point I’ve put too much hard work into building my own brand.”

So far, Howard’s only partnership of note has been with Marriott. Where will he go next? Why not your client?

Full “fireside chat” interview after the jump if you’re interested.

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Is Sponsored Content Really More ‘Transparent’ Than PR?

To be honest with you, readers, many conversations about “content” alternately lull us to sleep and make us want to tear our hair out. Like most in the media, we have mixed feelings about the move toward a universal adoption of sponsored stories as a source of revenue for news outlets.

We have friends in the journalistic community who now write such stories for clients. They tell us that they see their role as supporting the work performed by their employer’s editorial team while managing to create content aligned with causes they support. (This is an ideal scenario, really.)

Still, we’ve noticed several people this week debating whether sponsored material is somehow preferable to “traditional” stories that involve a bigger role for PR. One anonymous “native” journalist interview by Digiday even went so far as to ask how PR-driven stories are “any different from native advertising, at the end of the day.”

The question begs for an answer.

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Sears, Walmart Apologize for Selling Nazi Poster (No Comment from Amazon)

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Today we learned that three of the country’s largest online retailers do not effectively screen the products they offer for evidence of Nazism.

On Monday, Digiday reported on the news (first broken by Heeb last week) that Walmart‘s online store offered shoppers a poster featuring an image of the gate at Dachau concentration camp, which was the very first opened by the German government to hold political prisoners in 1933 (and at which tens of thousands of innocent people died). The fact that the saying on the gate reads “work makes you free” is especially perverse.

Further searches revealed that Amazon and Sears also featured the item online. Their excuse? The dreaded “third party vendor.”

Let’s compare their statements.

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Digiday’s Sternberg to Run Sponsored Content for The Washington Post

JOSH_300x250This morning we learned that Josh Sternberg will leave his position at one of our favorite blogsDigiday, to run native advertising operations at The Washington Post’s Brand Studio.

Here’s what you may not know: while Sternberg’s most recent role was Senior Editor of Digiday’s own sponsored Content Studio (and he has been reporting on the site for some time), he was once a PR guy specializing in media relations and strategic comms.

As he told PRNewser co-founder Joe Ciarallo back in 2009, he leveraged his experience at RLM and Stanton Crenshaw (now Crenshaw Communications) to launch his own shop called Sternberg Strategic Communications before moving into journalism in 2012.

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How Valuable Is Social Media Engagement, Again?

The headline here is truly an open question, because so many within the marketing/PR communities disagree. Here’s the tweet that inspired it:

Gregg may be considered something of an authority on this issue since he serves as VP of social at MasterCard.

Yet many have other ideas. Just yesterday, for example, a Punchtab study told us that most Millennials only care about such interactions when they involve free stuff or discounts.

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New Wall Street Journal Blog ‘CMO Today’ Has the Marketing Industry Covered

Screen Shot 2014-03-24 at 2.34.22 PMToday The Wall Street Journal officially launchedCMO Today“, its new site for marketing/advertising news directed at marketing officers.

Suzanna VranicaWSJ’s chief advertising editor, will run the blog with the goal of “[defining] what matters and what doesn’t in the chaos of today’s marketing business.”

With a full-time staff of five, CMO Today (follow them on Twitter) will devote plenty of digital space to the ongoing merger between digital and traditional marketing.

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Airbnb Offers Journalists Solutions to Their #SochiProblems

We’ve covered a weighty topic or two today, so we’ll end the week on a lighter note: as Brian Morrissey of Digiday noted this afternoon, the famously responsive Airbnb decided to make the most of the many journalists documenting their terrible experiences with Sochi hotels by doing that thing they do and directing them toward alternatives in the area.

It started last night with this announcement:

The company’s social team followed up by interacting directly with those journos in need of a better place to rest:

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6 Journalists Talk About What ‘Good PR’ Means to Them

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This guest post comes to you courtesy of Caitlin Epstein, senior associate at Eastwick.

Stalkers. Hagglers. Pests. As a public relations professional who is paid to understand public perception, I’m well aware of the reputation of our profession.

The age-old rivalry between journalists and PR is one we hear about often, whether it’s through a dreaded “PR pet peeve” article, tweets from reporters or even inquiries from clients. I, however, find the rivalry a bit petty and feel that the public misses out on part of the story—a big part of the story. Regardless of arguments to the contrary, reporters rely on PR people and most are not afraid to admit it. Our profession was created to facilitate the rapport between companies and media, and the majority of the time, we do just that.

There are times when we screw up, of course: you may have seen the recent New York Times article criticizing a PR agency for its poor handling of a client’s announcement, and DigiDay also recently published a list of PR habits that drive reporters nuts. Every time one of these articles goes viral, the Eastwick office is abuzz with conversation on the nuances of PR. At this point, we have a pretty good idea of what to avoid in order to keep the peace. However, I’m always left wondering what the other side of the equation is—how and when does PR help reporters?

That question in mind, we decided to reach out to some of the journalists we’ve worked with over the years to hear their tips, tricks and examples of how PR can serve as a resource instead of a pain.

Here are some of our favorites:

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How Do Millennials Feel About Charity?

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On Giving Tuesday, we thought it would be appropriate to explore the relationship between charities and that most important demographic: Millennials (yes, we dislike the word too, but it seems we’re stuck with it).

Truth be told, we were initially inspired to write this post because of an irritating quote that “The Millennial Whisperer”, aka psych professor Dr. Jean Twinge, offered Digiday last week:

“One common [claim] is that this generation really wants to help people and they want jobs where that’s the No. 1 goal and that they’re very interested in getting along in government. And that’s not true. They’re even less interested in that than previous generations.”

So Gen Y talks a good game on generosity but doesn’t follow up, huh? Other researchers beg to differ.

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